building

Installed Building Products Acquires Insulation Contractors/Magellan Insulation


Installed Building Products, Inc. (the “Company” or “IBP”) (NYSE: IBP), an industry-leading installer of insulation and complementary building products, today announced it has acquired Insulation Contractors/Magellan Insulation, known within its local markets as Icon. Founded in 1989, Icon is headquartered in Kent, Washington, and provides insulation, waterproofing, and firestopping installation services to commercial and multi-family customers throughout Washington and Oregon.


“With total annual revenue of approximately $26 million, Icon expands our presence with commercial and multi-family customers in Washington and Oregon. In addition, the mix of both commercial and multi-family customers aligns well with the current growth we are experiencing across our nationwide footprint,” stated Jeff Edwards, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. “To date in 2020, we have acquired approximately $84 million of annual revenues. Acquisitions remain a key component of our growth strategy and we continue to have a robust pipeline of acquisition opportunities across multiple geographies, products and end markets. On behalf of everyone at Installed Building Products, I’d like to welcome Insulation Contractors/Magellan Insulation to our company.”


About Installed Building Products


Installed Building Products, Inc. is one of the nation’s largest new residential insulation installers and is a diversified installer of complementary building products, including waterproofing, fire-stopping, fireproofing, garage doors, rain gutters, window blinds, shower doors, closet shelving and mirrors and other products for residential and commercial builders located in the continental United States. The Company manages all aspects of the installation process for its customers, from direct purchase and receipt of materials from national manufacturers to its timely supply of materials to job sites and quality installation. The Company offers its portfolio of services for new and existing single-family and multi-family residential and commercial building projects from its national network of over 180 branch locations.


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A Renovation Saves Michael Graves’ Portland Building

Surfaces of all kinds are top of mind these days, so we decided to look at all aspects of them, in these articles, from A to Z. Thinking of surfaces less as a product category and more as a framework, we use them as a lens for understanding the designed environment. Surfaces are sites of materials innovation, outlets for technology and science, and embodiments of standards around health and sustainability, as well as a medium for artists and researchers to explore political questions.


Dlr Tpb Ewing 2890

Michael Graves’s Portland Building, a Postmodern landmark, has been plagued with structural and operational problems for years. DLR Group and contractor Howard S. Wright have recently completed a renovation and restoration that sought to correct these issues and improve the conditions for the employees who work within its walls. Priorities in the revamp included new exterior cladding, an overhaul of MEP systems, seismic upgrades, and new interior construction. Courtesy James Ewing/JBSA

From the moment architect Michael Graves won a 1979 design competition for what became known as the Portland Building, one of America’s first major works of Postmodern architecture, the city office’s boldly colorful facade and oversize historical references divided opinion. Some applauded its exuberant rejection of Modernist dogma, while others seethed at its cartoonish, skin-deep style.

Since its 1982 opening, Graves’s design, topped with Raymond Kaskey’s massive copper Portlandia statue, has become an icon. Yet one constituency always seemed unanimous in its discontent: the occupants. Administrative staff worked in a near-total absence of natural light, and maintenance crews were tasked with continually patching the leaky facade.

For a few months in 2014, local city councillors openly considered demolishing the building. Today, however, thanks to a $195 million renovation by DLR Group and contractor Howard S. Wright, this Postmodern landmark is not only free of leaks and

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EU plans big building renovation project to save energy

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union is announcing a major building renovation project this week seeking to cut down energy costs and polluting emissions while providing a big boost to the construction industry.

EU Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said Monday that the 27-nation bloc “must speed up” the pace of renovations if it is to meet climate change targets and said most efforts will go to schools, hospitals and social housing.

The bloc is littered with buildings that fail to contain heat in winter and cannot keep people cool in summer, creating massive energy bills that sap local budgets but also pollute cities and the atmosphere.

“Our buildings are responsible for 40% of our energy consumption,” said von der Leyen. And even though many buildings have or are being renovated, “at the current pace, it would take more than a century to bring emissions from our buildings to zero.”

The public funding of such projects would also help offset the massive damage that the coronavirus pandemic has done to the bloc’s economy. Some of the financial aid involved is set to come from the 750 billion-euro recovery fund backed by EU leaders over the summer.

The European Union has set a target to renovate 3% of government buildings each year, but because of poor monitoring some studies suggest this target is far from being met.

Last month, Energy Commissioner Kadri Simson stressed the need for renovations to meet the bloc’s target of climate neutrality and said the rate of renovations must now double. He stressed that more than a third of the bloc’s emissions come from buildings, through heating and air-conditioning.

The official announcement of the plans is set for Wednesday.

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Follow all AP stories on climate change issues at https:/apnews.com/hub/Climate.

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Then and Now: Associated General Contractors building

The Associated General Contractors of America formed in 1918 to represent commercial contractors who build everything from schools and office buildings to roads and bridges. In 1919, Spokane builders started their own chapter, which was officially chartered in April 1921.

For almost 100 years, the Inland Northwest AGC, a nonprofit trade association, has advocated on behalf of builders, subcontractors and industry service providers. For many years, the group had offices in the old Spokane Hotel at Sprague Avenue and Washington Street.

In 1958, the group built their own office building at 4935 E. Trent Ave. It was a modest building, with just a lounge, conference rooms, three offices and a catering kitchen.

The small building is an example of midcentury modern architecture from the firm of Royal McClure and Tom Adkison, who graduated in the same class at the University of Washington and practiced together in Spokane from 1947 to 1967.

The style, now called midcentury modern, which has been called harsh and sterile by some and elegant and sophisticated by others, was championed by a handful of Spokane architects, including Bruce Walker, Kenneth Brooks and John McGough, among others.

After McClure struck out on his own and moved to Seattle, Adkison was made the executive architect for Expo ’74, which encompassed the massive redevelopment of the downtown and riverfront area.

Hundreds of midcentury modern examples are catalogued at midcenturyspokane.org, a 2016 project of the Spokane City/County Historic Preservation Office and Spokane Historic Landmarks Commission.

The AGC building was redesigned and renovated in 2002. The firm of Bernardo|Wills Architects expanded the building, matched the original concrete façade and added an atrium. Many of the AGC membership, which includes the region’s largest commercial contractors, donated their skilled tradesmen to complete the building.

Among the services AGC provides is specialty training in

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Woman Said Contractor Never Completed Job Of Building Her Nail Salon, And It Turns Out The Contractor Isn’t Properly Registered Either

CHICAGO (CBS) — A South Side woman said she gave a man $30,000 to build her nail salon – and yet a year later, the job is not even close to complete.

CBS 2’s Tim McNicholas discovered the contractor is not even properly registered with the state.

“What you should be seeing by now is the floors done, the plumbing done,” said Cherry Washington.

Washington is a woman with a dream.

“All the manicure tables would have been on this side,” she said as she showed McNicholas the space.

There were contractors working on building Washington a small nail salon at 54th Street and Harlem Avenue when she talked to McNicholas. But those contractors were not the team she originally hired – they were replacements.

They came in after the original contractor fell short of his promises.

“When I tell you it’s been many a days that I cried, I did,” Washington said. “Many a days that I prayed for him, I did.”

In October 2019, Washington hired Derek Covington and Renewable Energy Concepts, who said the whole job would cost $34,000. They asked for $12,000 up front.

Covington’s team cleared out the old storefront and then convicted Washington to make more payments. But since then, she has seen little work and plenty of excuses.

“I was taking pictures. I was coming over at nighttime to figure out what’s going on. And I’m like, ‘Everything looks the same,’” Washington said, “and he was like: ‘Well, it’s the plumber. It’s the heating. It’s this. It’s that. It’s COVID.”

We’ve reported similar stories in the past about people losing thousands to other contractors who didn’t finish the job. So we wondered, what can a person do to avoid trouble with a contractor?

Experts say you should always check that they’re properly licensed.

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