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See the results of a $4.5M renovation project at Plano’s Carpenter Park Athletic Complex

A $4.5 million renovation project installing four new artificial turf playing fields at the Carpenter Park Athletic Complex in Plano is now complete. The fields can host games and practices for sports including football, soccer, lacrosse and rugby, among other activities.

The project was funded through a $15.5 million bond referendum approved by voters in 2017.

Strong interest and wear and tear on the fields led to the renovation project at Carpenter Park, according to a video report produced by the city.

“Over the years, it’s gone from a two-season to basically almost a year-round season…And you just can’t play on a natural turf that much without just wearing it to the nub and worse,” Kevin Murray, assistant parks superintendent, said in the video.

Traffic passes a polling place sign outside a Collin County Early Voting Location at Carpenter Park Recreation Center on Monday, June 29, 2020, in Plano. (Smiley N. Pool/The Dallas Morning News)

The Carpenter Park project also added new security fencing and an additional trail that makes a loop around the entire park. Two new restroom buildings, additional parking, new field lights and poles, and new irrigation were also installed. Other amenities include more trees and a decorative fence along Denham Way.

During construction, the project was temporarily stalled when crews found a red-tailed hawk nest on top of a light pole, according to the city. Crews had to work around the pole until the baby hawks were old enough to fly away.

The expected lifespan of the fields is 7 to 10 years, according to the city.

Other upcoming projects include the installation of two new athletic fields at Russell Creek Park.

Information about reserving an athletic field and policies for their use is available on the city’s athletics page.

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Attingal palace complex set for renovation- The New Indian Express

By Express News Service

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: The Attingal palace complex, an iconic monument that stood witness to the first homegrown revolt in Kerala against the British Empire, is finally set for renovation. According to B Satyan MLA, the government has sanctioned Rs 1.6 crore for renovating the complex to its past glory. Besides renovating the structure, a memorial of Attingal revolt will also be built, he said. 

The State Archaeology Department has prepared a masterplan for the refurbishment. “The procedures following the administrative sanction are being completed fast. Work will start as early as possible. A history museum is also planned,” he said. The state budget had earmarked Rs 3 crore for the palace renovation.       

The palace situated around 33 km from the capital city was a mute witness to the Attingal revolt in 1721.
Several structures in the sprawling palace complex are in a dilapidated condition. They include the padippura, the main entrance, nadapanthal, oottupura, kothalam and a nalukettu. Renovation and replacement of the structures built in stone, wood and tiles would be a challenging task for archeology department. 

The Attingal revolt was triggered by the malpractice of the British traders who camped at Anchuthengu under the captaincy of General Gyford. It was one of the early rebellions against the British colonial rule in the country.  The protest triggered over the British traders’ unilateral decision on the pricing of black pepper. 

On a night in 1721, a British team which headed to the palace to present the queen with annual gifts, was attacked by the locals led by the local landlords belonging to Ettuveettil Pillai family. killing 133 Britishers. 

The Anchuthengu Fort came under the control of local people for six months until they were defeated by troops which arrived from Thalassery. However, the queen of Attingal later entered into

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Big Santa Clara housing complex and working farm get key funding

SANTA CLARA — A unique mixed-use project of affordable homes and a working farm proposed for Santa Clara has landed key financing from a state bond, clearing the way for a construction start next year, the developers said.

Agrihood, which will consist of 361 homes and an urban farm across the street from the Westfield Valley Fair mall, has obtained $50 million in tax-exempt bonds from the California Debt Limit Allocation Committee, Core Cos., the developer of the Santa Clara project, said.

“Our success in securing bond financing reflects the importance of the Agrihood in providing stable, sustainable housing,” said Vince Cantore, a vice president of development with Core Cos.

The 361 new homes in Agrihood will include 181 that will be offered at below-market rates. Of the 181 affordable homes, 165 will be set aside for low-income seniors.

Along with the housing, Agrihood will also offer an urban farm, a cafe, a community room, and learning shed.

“Creating communities like Agrihood that have been intentionally designed to combine high-density living, social services, and access to healthy produce are needed now more than ever,” Cantore said.

Construction should begin in 2021, Core Cos. said.

Agrihood can also help address at least some uncertainties and health worries ushered in by the coronavirus, Core Cos. said.

“The focus on our residents’ health and wellness is incredibly important in these challenging times,” the developer said Wednesday.

Proposals had emerged as early as 2005 for affordable homes on that site, which for a number of years had been used for agricultural research by the University of California.

Neighbors, however, opposed the notion of affordable homes on the property and the outcry torpedoed the 2005 proposal.

Now, however, with a project groundbreaking in view for some time during the first three months of 2021, those

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