conditions

Red Flag Fire Warning Conditions Return; 293 Homes, 272 Commercial Buildings Destroyed; Chance Of Rain Next Weekend

ST. HELENA (CBS SF) — An intense air war was waged on the north edge of the Glass Fire burn zone Saturday, allowing weary firefighters to extend containment of the massive blaze burning in Sonoma and Napa counties to 15 percent before red flag fire conditions settled in for the night.

Loading...

Load Error

Cal Fire Operations Chief Mark Bruton said during his Saturday night briefing that air support was playing a key role on the northern edge of the blaze burning in steep terrain toward Lake County.

“It’s really steep, heavy terrain, we have some control lines in there but we have a bit of a lack of resources to really work in that kind of terrain,” he said. “We used aircraft to really pound it today. We dropped a lot of retardant to help slow the advance of the fire.”

Meanwhile, weather forecasters were keeping on an eye on a front developing in the Pacific that could bring much needed showers to the San Francisco Bay Area next weekend. Of particular interest, National Weather Service forecasters said, were plumes of moisture spinning toward Northern California from Hurricane Marie.

“In general, in looking at trends would say that confidence is increasing for some type of precipitation by next weekend,” the weather service said. “Rain amounts all over the board based on if Marie gets ingested as well as where (the) cold front would move onshore. As usual would say the better chances would be North Bay and points northward at this time.”

But Bruton said the front will not likely bring the level of rain needed to end the fire season.

“We would need to see something like 4-6 inches (of rain) to change how dry these fuels and make it a game changer,” he said. “Is that a possibility?

Continue Reading

With trees in homes, many in Lake Charles living in questionable conditions a month after Hurricane Laura

“Carefully. Praying we don’t fall through the floor in the bathroom,” Veronica Thomas said.

LAKE CHARLES, La. — It’s been more than a month since Hurricane Laura made landfall in Southwest Louisiana. Many have moved back to homes in pieces as they work to rebuild. 

“It’s actually in the roof,” said Lake Charles resident Veronica Thomas about the tree in her home. “So it’s a big gaping hole, a turbine fell out the house, big gaping hole there. My bedroom was flooded, my bathroom was flooded, the living room was flooded, kitchen was flooded.”

She’s still living there now. 

“Carefully. Praying we don’t fall through the floor in the bathroom,” she said.

Even as she waits to hear from insurance, she’s relieved to see workers taking the tree off her roof one month after the storm. 

“Right now it’s coming out of my pocket, which is not a lot,” she said about the expenses for the work. 

Trees also fell through Doris Lee’s home.   

“Puncturing my house, we have leaks everywhere. I’m not the only one, but it was startling to see something like that,” Lee said. 

The smell of mold fills one of her bedrooms, but she and her family are still living there. 

“We just had to give up two bedrooms and we gave up the front part of the house so we’re fine,” Lee said. 

They’re cleaning up and see progress everyday, while living in these tree filled homes

While some homes are still unlivable, many people have returned home. Now 99 percent of Lake Charles has power restored and drinkable water. They’ve seen progress over the last month, but there is clearly a long way to go. 

Source Article

Continue Reading

Brush fire threatening homes near Santa Clarita amid red-flag conditions

Martindale fire in Santa Clarita. <span class="copyright">(KTLA)</span>
Martindale fire in Santa Clarita. (KTLA)

A brush fire ignited Monday afternoon above Santa Clarita, enveloping 300 acres within minutes as it burned with “a rapid rate of speed,” fire authorities said. It comes amid heightened fire danger in Southern California with rising temperatures and strengthening winds.

The blaze, which has been dubbed the Martindale Fire, broke out just after 3 p.m., burning a 10-acre area about 15 miles northeast of Santa Clarita, according to the Los Angeles County Fire Department. Within about 20 minutes, it had spread to 200 acres. The fire is moving south, buffeted by “gusty winds,” the Angeles National Forest Service said.

The Los Angeles County Fire Department ordered residents to evacuate about a dozen homes south of Bouquet Reservoir, between the dam and mile marker 11.5. Authorities issued an evacuation warning for the area south of mile marker 11.5 to Texas Canyon Fire Station. Some structures are threatened by flames, fire authorities said. Bouquet Canyon Road is closed between Vasquez Canyon and Bouquet Reservoir.

The National Weather Service issued a red flag warning for the Los Angeles and Ventura county mountains and the Santa Clarita Valley, noting the conditions could last for several days.

The warning includes the potential for “rapid fire growth and extreme fire behavior if ignition occurs” as well as the threat of smoke plumes and heat-related illnesses.

But it’s the combination of variables that is the greatest concern as a new heat wave bears down on the region: The forecast calls for gusty Santa Ana winds up to 40 mph, humidity levels in the teens and single digits, and temperatures in the valleys as high as 100 degrees by Wednesday and in the 90s in some coastal areas.

A heat advisory will be in effect from 10 a.m. Tuesday to 8

Continue Reading