containment

Highway 29, Silverado Trail Reopened; Firefighters Gain 82 Percent Containment; 642 Homes Destroyed In Napa, Sonoma Counties

ST. HELENA (CBS SF) — Across Wine Country a sense of normality was beginning to take grip early Saturday as major roadways closed by the threat of the Glass Fire were reopened, neighborhoods in St. Helena, Calistoga and Angwin repopulated, less smoke was visible on the horizon and utility crews were busy restoring electrical power to once evacuated homes.

Loading...

Load Error

As of Saturday morning, the Glass Fire burn zone had grown to 67,484 acres with 82 percent containment, but a once promising weather front and the showers it would produce, never arrived.

“Crews experienced minimal fire behavior throughout the night on the Glass Fire,” Cal Fire said in a Saturday morning update. “These conditions consisted of creeping and smoldering fire behavior within the current perimeter.”

There were a few mandatory evacuations still in place, but the majority had been either completely lifted or reduced to warnings that allowed residents to return to their homes.

But for more than 640 families, their return home was not celebratory. Cal Fire damaged assessment teams reported as of Saturday morning, at least 642 homes had been destroyed in Sonoma and Napa counties. Another 157 homes had received some kind of damage.

Among those who lost their home was Mike Christianson and his wife, Mluz Torres. They had watched in horror as the flames engulfed their Napa County home while they were evacuating during the fire’s early hours.

“It was within five minutes, the entire side of the hill was on fire. All trees, all burning, all roaring like a jet,” he said. “And at that moment, we realized that it was time to go. So we grabbed a few things, jumped in the car.”

Others were relieved to find their homes still standing.

“You know, I thought it was going to be a

Continue Reading

California wildfire destroys over 550 homes as fire crews increase containment, ‘turned the corner’

A wildfire burning in Northern California’s famed wine country has now destroyed over 550 homes, but officials said Monday they were hopeful as containment of the blaze increased overall.

Cal Fire said as of Tuesday morning the Glass Fire that’s burning in Napa and Sonoma counties has scorched some 66,840 acres and is now 50% contained.

“We have turned the corner on the fire as a whole,” Cal Fire division chief Ben Nicholls said during a briefing in Sonoma County.

CALIFORNIA WILDFIRE SURPASSES 1 MILLION ACRES AS AUGUST COMPLEX DUBBED ‘MEGAFIRE’

Over 2,700 fire personnel are involved in the battle against the blaze, with some 408 fire engines deployed in the fight against the two-county blaze, according to the agency.

“We are the priority for the state here,” Nicholls said Monday.

In this Sept. 28, 2020, file photo, houses leveled by the Glass Fire are viewed on a street in the Skyhawk neighborhood of Santa Rosa, Calif.

In this Sept. 28, 2020, file photo, houses leveled by the Glass Fire are viewed on a street in the Skyhawk neighborhood of Santa Rosa, Calif.
(AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)

The blaze has destroyed some 553 homes, with 297 in Sonoma County and 256 in Napa County that have been lost so far. The wildfire is still threatening over 21,000 structures, according to fire officials.

A firefighter runs past flames while battling the Glass Fire in a Calistoga, Calif., vineyard Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020.

A firefighter runs past flames while battling the Glass Fire in a Calistoga, Calif., vineyard Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020.
(AP Photo/Noah Berger)

The wildfire has also damaged or destroyed at least 18 wineries, with many locations reporting major damage.

“We have a little half an acre here that got pretty scorched,” Lisa Drinkward of Behrens Family Winery told KTVU.

A chimney stands at a Fairwinds Estate Winery building, which burned in the Glass Fire, on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020, in Calistoga, Calif.

A chimney stands at a Fairwinds Estate Winery building, which burned in the Glass Fire, on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020, in Calistoga, Calif.
(AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Nearly 3,000 people remain under mandatory evacuation orders in Sonoma County, while 13,000 are under warnings and may need

Continue Reading

Bobcat Fire has damaged or destroyed at least 115 homes and continues to burn with 84% containment

The Bobcat Fire has damaged or destroyed at least 115 homes and dozens other structures as it continues to burn through the Angeles National Forest after igniting nearly a month ago, officials said Saturday.

Firefighters have largely gained the upper hand on the blaze, which had burned 114,963 acres, or 179.6 square miles, and was 84% contained as of Saturday morning — up from 75% two days ago.

Aided by strong winds and insufficient firefighting resources, the Bobcat Fire advanced on the Antelope Valley foothills in mid-September, ripping a path of destruction along the way.

Completely destroyed are 87 homes and 83 other buildings. The fire has also damaged 28 more homes and another 19 structures. Many of the homes destroyed were in the Juniper Hills area.

“The number of damaged and destroyed buildings may rise as damage assessment teams continue to gather accurate data from properties spanning over 114,900+ acres,” officials said in the federal InciWeb page.

On Saturday, the fire was expected to mainly smolder in the hot areas but stay within its existing burn footprint, where crews planned to spend the day mopping up, patrolling and improving containment lines.

But at an interior island northeast of Mt. Wilson, a pocket of fire will continue to consume another 300 acres within the fire control lines in an area with steep, rugged terrain that has been difficult for firefighters to access.

“Heavy smoke may be visible during peak heat hours as this internal island of fuel burns,” fire officials said.

Crews will be patrolling the area and looking out for fire spotting and other alarming behavior in temperatures over 90 degrees and low humidities.

Firefighters struggled to contain the fast-moving fire early in the battle as flames tore through extremely dry and rugged brush, set trees ablaze and spotted

Continue Reading

Fewer homes threatened, containment increases, PG&E rebuilding power lines

Editor’s note: We have made this story free to all readers as an important public service. If you are able, please consider a subscription to the Redding Record Searchlight/Redding.com.



a car parked in a parking lot: Cars burned down along Ono Road on Sunday afternoon, Sept. 27, 2020.


© Hung T. Vu/Special to the Record Searchlight
Cars burned down along Ono Road on Sunday afternoon, Sept. 27, 2020.

With little growth since Thursday night, firefighters were able to get more control lines around the Zogg Fire, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection reported Friday.

Only 101 structures are now under threat by the Zogg Fire, down from the 1,538 structures that were in peril at the blaze’s peak.

The fire, which started Sunday afternoon, is 56% contained after growing on Friday night to 56,168 acres — a gain of only 365 acres from Thursday night.

Cal Fire released the following new figures:

  • The number of structures destroyed rose to 170, up from the 153 reported Friday morning. The number of structures damaged rose to 23 from 21.

Also, power company PG&E announced that its crews have been rebuilding poles and power lines since Tuesday as they get access to more sections within the Zogg Fire evacuation and burn areas. 

Work to remove fire-damaged hazard trees and rebuild the electric infrastructure will continue through the weekend.

Much of the containment growth around the fire, as of Friday morning, happened in the south in the Highway 36 corridor in the area of Tehama County, Cal Fire said.

The north portion of the fire on Friday morning was still burning. It includes west of Clear Creek, according to a map released by Cal Fire on Friday morning. Firefighters, though, have managed to keep the fire from crossing the creek and into more populated areas west of Redding.

Cal Fire officials at their Friday press briefing announced that more residents

Continue Reading