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Reese Witherspoon, Pink, and More Stars Convert Their Homes Into Classrooms

The shift to remote learning poses new challenges for parents everywhere. In addition to keeping a squirmy seven-year-old’s attention or learning math again, creating a school in one’s home is now part of the to-do list. Transforming a living space into an effective learning space is a feat in redesigning and repurposing. But based on what they’ve shared on Instagram, famous parents like Busy Philipps, Neil Patrick Harris, and more have managed to set their kids up for success. So if you haven’t quite nailed the home school aesthetic, read on for some inspiration.

Melissa Joan Hart

Sometimes the best way to create a hybrid space is to add one key piece of furniture. The Melissa & Joey star set up her son at an antique-style school desk, and he appears to be in the zone as he works on his numerical penmanship.

Busy Philipps

The podcast host went the dining room table route for her daughter’s remote learning base. While the space uses dark tones, the playful prints on her wallpaper and the chevron rug lend a sense of whimsy and fun that is at least somewhat appropriate for a second-grade classroom.

Casey Wilson

The Black Monday star has managed to find the animal chairs of our childhood dreams. A perfect balance between kitsch and style, this simple addition makes her house feel like a classroom. Also of note is the tray full of mini water bottles she has ready for her kindergartener son. Hydration is key to a successful year!

Jenna Fischer

Even celebrities fall victim to cluttered spaces. However, when you look past the clutter it is hard not to note how the warm woods, natural light, and perfectly worn-in table makes the Office star’s dining room perfect to transition from classroom to family dinners. She also

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Convert Your Living Room – A Home Improvement

From early times in the United States (US), up to the 1970s, much family activity centered on the living room of a home. Also known as "the receiving room," home makers took guests there as soon as they entered the home. This room contains the best seating and furnishings. There, the draperies hung finely about the windows. A small piano might reside in the room. A vase with fresh-cut flowers and a bowl filled with nuts or mints might rest on the coffee table. "Eat something while I fetch coffee from the kitchen," a home maker might say to guests.

Kept spotlessly clean, the living room location permitted the homemaker to entertain guests without their getting far into the dwelling (where messes lurked). A home maker might comfortably engage in polite and interesting conversation, and make an impression on guests in the living room. That location, the most formal, coat-and-tie room in the house, exuded sophistication as well as cleanliness and it wordlessly identified the family as rising in social status (or it did not). But, housing changed in the US in the 1970's when people wanted to express themselves, to have more choice, and they cared less about what guests thought of them.

They cared more about configuring their home with imaginative and useful living space. Still, even today, most newly constructed homes, as well as the ones built before the 1970s, have living rooms. Yet, the family room (where the radio once rested, then the television set sat, and now the wide-screen TV mounts upon a wall) practically centers both the family and their guests. Entertainment in the digital age, not simple conversation, requires access to digital content (no coat-and-tie necessary or wanted).

Homeowners began to remodel their living rooms into home offices, a special room ensconced with …

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