Coronavirus

Beth Sholom celebrates 40 years with renovation and no coronavirus outbreaks

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (WAVY) – It’s a big year for Beth Sholom Village in Virginia Beach. The rehabilitation and senior living facility is celebrating 40 years in our community, the end of a major renovation, and no outbreaks during this coronavirus pandemic.

Beth Sholom Village takes the health of its residents and patients very seriously. So, when COVID-19 hit and workers learned seniors were high risk, the facility made some big policy changes.

“When somebody comes into our building for the very first time no matter whether they are coming from home, from the hospital, another facility, they go on what we created as an isolation unit,” explained Marcia Brodie, Marketing Director for Beth Sholom.

She said she feels like coming to work every day is one of the safest places she can be. “Every single staff member, I think we maybe have 320, is tested every single week. Tuesdays are our testing day.”

Marcia went on to say, “We’ve not allowed visitors in since March. So, a lot of people have not seen their loved one face-to-face.”

The only exception to that rule, Marcia said, is when a patient is nearing end of life.

Beth Sholom staff members also got very creative to make sure their residents could stay in touch with family.

“We did a lot of window visits. So, a family member is on the outside, the resident is on the inside. We have a staff member typically who facilitates with a cell phone. We’re not allowed to open the window, but they talk through the phone or an iPad.”

About a month and a half ago, the Beth Sholom team added a new plan to keep families connected. “We had a team build a plexiglass

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Coronavirus boosts cloud kitchens as foodie Asians order in

BANGKOK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Singapore’s Ebb & Flow Group took an unusual route to creating one of its most popular food items: analysing more than 200,000 data points to predict customer preference and potential demand.

The result, launched shortly before the coronavirus sent the city into lockdown, was Wrap Bstrd – wraps with fillings such as chicken satay rice and beef bulgogi, borne from the insight that customers preferred Asian flavours in a fuss-free fashion.

“We were able to combine advanced behavioural data capabilities and pattern analyses with the expertise of our chefs to create a brand and menu that was specifically tailored for our customers,” said chief executive Lim Kian Chun.

“It is Singapore’s first food and beverage brand that is driven entirely by insights derived from artificial intelligence,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Ebb & Flow Group is one of a growing number of companies operating restaurant kitchens known as “dark”, “cloud” or “ghost” kitchens, which have no physical presence, and offer delivery-only services from a centralised location through a mobile app.

Often operating out of warehouses and semi-industrial buildings on the outskirts of cities, dark kitchens allow for burgers and biryanis to be made in the same location, and delivered directly to consumers ordering online.

While food delivery was already on the rise in recent years with aggregators such as Zomato, Uber Eats and foodpanda, coronavirus lockdowns and concerns about eating out have precipitated a boom in these services lately, analysts say.

“The cloud kitchen model was already gaining momentum, now it is at a tipping point for the model to be fully utilised because of the shift to at-home consumption,” said Ali Potia, a partner at consulting firm McKinsey.

“We are now starting to see data-driven menu design and pricing for greater personalisation. It

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More than 100 N.J. nursing homes have had coronavirus outbreaks since summer as crisis continues

The coronavirus devastated New Jersey’s nursing homes this spring, killing thousands of residents and prompting a raft of measures to better protect the state’s most vulnerable population.

Since that time, long-term care facilities say they have stockpiled personal protective equipment. They’ve developed protocols for testing residents and staff and isolating those who are sickened. Visitors continue to be limited by state regulators, amid fears the virus will be reintroduced as families reunite with their loved ones.

Yet despite those precautions, the coronavirus continues to creep into the state’s nursing homes, assisted-living centers and other senior facilities, even among those that managed to eradicate their original outbreaks, Department of Health data shows.

Across New Jersey, at least 102 long-term care facilities saw new outbreaks this summer or fall after being declared COVID-19 free, according to a review by NJ Advance Media. Included in those were 11 facilities in which residents or staffers died in the new contagions.

That points to a somber reality as New Jersey grapples with a concerning resurgence of coronavirus in recent weeks: Even as nursing homes have had nearly seven months of experience combating the virus, many remain unable to keep it wholly at bay. Still, those outbreaks are proving less deadly and easier to contain than in March or April, when underprepared facilities were floored by a pandemic that caught them, the state and the country flat-footed, flooding New Jersey’s hospitals and morgues.

On Friday, a union that represents 8,000 nursing home workers in New Jersey expressed concerns about a second wave of the disease and the impacts it could carry.

“Nursing home operators need to be taking every precaution, including giving frontline workers access to n95 masks, gowns and surgical masks before, not after, new outbreaks emerge,” said Milly Silva, the executive vice president of

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County reports new coronavirus deaths at nursing homes for first time in 3 weeks

For the first time in three weeks, San Diego County reported new coronavirus deaths among residents and health care workers at skilled nursing facilities.

As of Wednesday, there have been 173 deaths from COVID-19 among nursing home staff and residents combined, up from 168 reported during the last two weeks. San Diego County reported 1,139 cases of novel coronavirus among nursing home residents and 729 cases among health care workers Wednesday, up from 1,103 and 717 last week.

One new outbreak in skilled nursing homes was reported by the county this week, bringing the total to 84 over the course of the pandemic. There are 20 nursing home outbreaks that are still deemed active, down from the 21 active ones reported last week.

Unlike community outbreaks that are defined as three or more linked cases from separate households, outbreaks in nursing homes only need one case among either residents or health care workers. An outbreak is considered inactive once no one at the facility has tested positive for novel coronavirus for at least two weeks.

According to the California Department of Public health database, 53 of the county’s 86 skilled nursing facilities have been approved to resume indoor visitations.

Only five facilities in the county haven’t recorded a single case among either residents or health care workers, according to the state’s database. They are Amaya Springs Health Care Center in Spring Valley, Arroyo Vista Nursing Center in San Diego, Monte Vista Lodge in Lemon Grove, Somerset Subacute and Care in El Cajon, and Valle Vista Convalescent Hospital in Escondido.

Those looking for COVID-19 statistics or visitation information at a specific skilled nursing facility can view the online version of this story at http://bit.ly/SNFOct7 to search the full dataset.

Nursing home administrators were reminded Monday of their obligation to help residents

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Coronavirus relief funds for nursing homes dry up, raising fears for elderly, vulnerable

As drafts of a renewed coronavirus relief package continue to be debated in and around the White House, the many millions left languishing in nursing homes and elderly care facilities – along with their loved ones forced to communicate with them from afar – are urging swift action.

According to the American Health Care Association (AHCA), almost all the initial $175 billion U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) funds from the CARES Act – which was signed into law by President Trump in late March – has been spent, and yet coronavirus – officially termed COVID-19 – cases in at least 22 states continues to ascend, ahead of the already daunting cold and flu season.

“HHS has announced distribution plans for 80 percent of the $175 billion Provider Relief Fund created by the CARES Act. Health care providers, including nursing homes, will need additional resources to continue its response to the COVID pandemic heading into the cold and flu season, which provides new challenges,” Mark Parkinson, president and CEO of American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL), told Fox News. “COVID-19 disproportionately impacts the elderly – many of whom already have preexisting health conditions and chronic diseases – and the dedicated staff who care for them.”

AMID CORONAVIRUS, 1 IN 4 AMERICANS ARE FAILING TO WASH THEIR HANDS: CDC

The American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL) has thus requested an additional $100 billion from the HHS Provider Relief Fund, which is accessible for all health care providers impacted by the novel pathogen, and asked “that a sizeable portion of the fund be dedicated to helping nursing homes and assisted living communities to acquire resources associated with protecting vulnerable residents and staff from the virus, including constant testing, personal protective

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