Cottage

Dover Doins: Small cottage homes could help fill a big need – News – fosters.com

There are many discussions about these two words: perception and reality. They came to my mind while reading some reactions shared on social media, particularly about the proposal for 44 single-family “cottages” to be built in Dover. They are described as a cluster of “single family detached cottages” 384 square feet each, with kitchen/living room, bedroom and bath.

The developers are proposing these as addressing need for affordable housing locally.

Let’s talk about living in this modest space and the reaction by many members of the social media. Some yeah, some nay, and of course, as is the nature of the beast, many suggesting changes.

The first qualification popping up is of course, money. Here’s where our first thoughts of perception and reality come in. It is suggested that these homes will be rentals as opposed to purchased units.

The developers suggest $800 to $1,000 per month rent as something within the financial realm of 18- to 25-year-olds (even age 30) earning somewhere in the vicinity of $16-$20 an hour.

Make sense?

How much money are you making annually, and how much are you paying for rent on the Seacoast? How much space do you live in? What do you consider “affordable?”

Let’s try this one: Are you right now looking for rental space in the Tri-City area on the lower end of the monthly rent spectrum? In Dover, the average rent in September 2020 was $1,312 for a one bedroom apartment. How are you folks doing finding something in that range? We often see and hear the complaints of area residents bemoaning the growth of Dover as “gentrification.” That certainly has a substantial effect on what property owners can and do charge for rent, doesn’t it?

Regarding the size and viability of the cottage houses. Numerous social media posts

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Abandoned house and companion cottage win Petaluma’s top renovation award

When Karen Brown went searching for a property in Petaluma where she and a longtime friend might co-invest and coexist, there was nothing on the market that fit the bill. It was 2013, the nation was coming out of a deep recession and the pickings were slim, especially for affordable properties with two units or enough area to build an accessory dwelling. So Brown walked the streets of the old west side and ended up beating the bushes — literally — to find her dream home hidden among an overgrowth of acacias.

The house was so concealed she almost missed it. A “no trespassing“ sign did not encourage exploration. But she was intrigued. There, set back on a third of an acre, was an abandoned shack with plywood nailed over the doors. It had no foundation and perched on piers in the ground. It hadn’t been occupied in at least 10 years, apart from the possum living in the front room.

Despite all that, Brown saw immediate possibilities. The property was large enough for a second small home, and there was something about the forlorn little cabin that tugged at her heart.

She came to call it “the little house that cried.”

“It was either going to get torn down or somebody was going to come along at the last minute and love it. And that’s what happened.”

Potential in the ruins

As the creative director of an educational nonprofit, Brown, with her artistic imagination, could see possibility amid the ruins. Her friend Alan Good shared her vision.

“There’s an old saying about ‘location, location, location.’ That was really clear,” said Good, a longtime horticulturist who for years managed the living roof of the California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park. “West Petaluma is a wonderful place to live,

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Bruna’s Cheese Bread Moves From Food Truck to Cottage Bakery

“It’s a bread meant to be eaten fresh out of the oven,” says Bruna Piauí Graf, founder of Bruna’s Cheese Bread. “It can be good later, but I don’t suggest that.” Brazilian pão de queijo — or cheese bread — are savory puff pastries made with gluten-free tapioca flour and cheese. They’re served everywhere in Brazil, and now, thanks to Graf, here in Denver as well.

Graf says she started Bruna’s Cheese Bread because she couldn’t find good pão de queijo in Denver. In 2019, she used the bread as inspiration for a food truck serving Brazilian sandwiches. But when this year’s pandemic ended plans for owning the food truck, Graf turned to selling the pre-made dough as it’s often found in Brazil: frozen and ready to be baked in the oven.

Pão de queijo originated in the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais. The key ingredient, tapioca flour, comes from the yuca plant found there. Yuca, different from yucca, is a starchy tuber long used by Brazilian indigenous peoples to make bread. The process of extracting the flour involves peeling and grating the tuber, soaking it and letting it dry. When colonizers brought enslaved African people to the area, they learned to use the leftover tapioca starch to make their own bread, subsidizing the meager food they were given.

Years later, in the 19th century, Minas Gerais became known for producing a hard, salty Minas cheese. The cheese, plus milk and eggs, were added to the pão de queijo recipe, and it soon became a national delicacy.

Graf started making cheese bread here in Denver in 2019.

Graf started making cheese bread here in Denver in 2019.

Courtesy of Bruna’s Cheese Bread

Graf remembers eating pão de queijo while growing up in Barau, Brazil. “I would always go with my friends and family as a teenager to this [cafe], and

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