COVID19

Researchers design comprehensive toolkit to help Ohioans at higher COVID-19 risk

Those looking to improve the lives of Ohioans facing the greatest COVID-19 risks now have a comprehensive, evidence-based toolkit – one designed to inform the work of everyone from grassroots community groups to state leaders.

Ohio’s COVID-19 Populations Needs Assessment, released today (Oct. 13, 2020) and led by experts at The Ohio State University College of Public Health, aims to improve Ohioans’ ability to prevent transmission of the virus and minimize its impact on communities that are at elevated risk.

The new report, conducted in collaboration with the Ohio Department of Health, is built on information gathered from a survey of 363 Ohioans representing people of color, rural populations and individuals with disabilities.

The survey, subsequent analysis and recommendations focus on six populations: Black and African American; Latino and Hispanic; Asian and Asian American; immigrant and refugee; rural; and people with disabilities.

All of these are communities of people living strong, full, culturally rich lives with various resources and leaders. We sincerely hope that this report helps the communities, and those who serve them, to build upon that foundation.”


Julianna Nemeth, Assistant Professor, Department of Health Behavior and Health Promotion, Ohio State University College of Public Health  

Nemeth also co-led the project with Tasleem Padamsee, an assistant professor of health services management and policy.

Going in, the research team knew that these communities were among those most likely to suffer disproportionately high rates of infection, hospitalization and death because they entered the pandemic already dealing with poorer overall health status, lesser access to health care and more negative social determinants of health than others.

The needs assessment explored where these Ohioans live and work, what resources exist in these areas, what barriers these groups face in accessing public

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Messenger: Parson orders investigation into COVID-19 outbreak in veterans homes. What about prisons? | Tony Messenger

The state prison in Farmington is undergoing at least its second major COVID-19 spike, with 300 detainees and 53 staff members infected. Since the pandemic began, there have been 481 detainees and 108 staffers infected at Farmington. Down the road, also in St. Francois County, the prison at Bonne Terre has 46 active detainee cases and nine staff members affected, bringing its total to 370 detainees infected since the pandemic began, and 103 staff members.

St. Francois County, just south of St. Louis, has one of the highest positivity rates in the state of Missouri, at 37 people per 1,000. It’s a chicken-and-egg question: Is the prison spike feeding the positivity rate, or is it because there is little mask wearing and social distancing in another rural county eschewing mandates and restrictions, continuing to believe that the more than 210,000 deaths nationwide are a hoax?

Missourians should not be surprised by COVID-19 spikes in institutions in rural areas, says Dave Dillon, the spokesman for the Missouri Hospital Association, which has been urging the governor to implement mask mandates and other pandemic restrictions.

“With the high infection rates statewide, smaller communities’ hospital and health care resources are reaching their capacity levels,” Dillon says. “When you look at where the patients are from, many are from outside of the community or even county where the hospital is located. While we can’t prove causation, it certainly correlates that these patients are from communities that have not put strict precautions in place for transmission like mask mandates or social distancing requirements.”

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Young people return to their parents’ homes in the US due to COVID-19


6 min read

This article was translated from our Spanish edition using AI technologies. Errors may exist due to this process.


This story originally appeared on Alto Nivel

By Antonio Sandoval

For the first time in nine decades , young adults have returned to parental homes at a rate not seen since the Great Depression era of the 1930s , according to an analysis by the Pew Research Center with data from the United States Census Bureau.

The obvious cause was the loss of job or decrease in income that the pandemic brought with it. According to the source, at the end of July the total number of young adults who lived with one of their parents or with both grew to 26.6 million , which meant an increase of 2.6 million compared to February , just before the devastating impact of the pandemic in the world’s largest economy.

This measurement includes only young people between 18 and 29 years of age and, according to the figures, the phenomenon was highly concentrated in the segment of young people between 18 and 24 years of age, the age of greatest economic vulnerability in adulthood. In percentage terms, it means that 52 percent of young people in the analyzed age range , 18 to 29 years old, live with their parents, the highest rate since the Great Depression era.

In fact, the Pew Research Center indicates that this rate of 52 percent is already even higher than the 48 percent reported in 1940 during the end of the Great Depression and the entry of the United States into World War II, with no accurate figures. in the worst part of the economic crash of the 1930s, so the most recent measurement is in fact the largest ever observed in

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Philippine Consulate in Dubai undergoes renovation to prevent spread of COVID-19

Philippine Consulate 03-1602497829407
New modular service counters provide an extra layer of protection to curb the spread of COVID-19 at the consulate.
Image Credit: Supplied

Dubai: The Philippine Consulate General in Dubai has recently undergone renovations and has introduced new modular service counters to provide an extra layer of protection to curb the spread of COVID-19.

The reception area, passport processing section, passport coordinator’s office, encoding section, notarial processing section and the Assistance-to-Nationals (ATN) section are among the nine offices that were renovated with office modular partitions, Philippine consul-general Paul Raymund Cortes told Gulf News.

“While the Consulate strives to creatively accommodate the demand for consular services by our kababayan (compatriots) here in Dubai and the Northern Emirates during this time of pandemic, we also aim to provide them comfort and safety while they are inside the Consulate premises. We would like to welcome them to an improved Consulate,” Cortes said. “More importantly, we want to make sure that if and when they are at the consulate, there is minimal physical interaction and enough distancing between clients and our personnel so there is less risk of spreading the virus among themselves,” he underlined.

Philippine Consulate 02-1602497831368
The renovation is part of the Philippine Department of Foreign Affairs’ (DFA) commitment to provide better facilities and services.
Image Credit: Supplied

Cortes said the physical renovation of the consulate is part of the Philippine Department of Foreign Affairs’ (DFA) commitment to provide better facilities and services to  overseas Filipinos and in adherence to UAE’s call for a responsible return to a ‘new normal’.

How to reach the Philippine Consulate

* WhatsApp — +971 56 4177558
* ATN Section — +971 56 5015755/ +971 56 5015756
Email Addresses:
* Civil Registry Unit (CRU) / Report of Birth and Death: [email protected]
* Notarials: [email protected]
*Passport Renewal: [email protected]
* Passport Releasing: [email protected]

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Delhi stops displaying notices at homes of COVID-19 patients because of stigma

By Sanjeev Miglani

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – Delhi authorities have stopped putting notices outside the homes of people infected with coronavirus because this has amplified the social stigma associated with the disease and in turn caused others to hide their illness, officials said on Monday.

Early on during the outbreak in the Indian capital, officials would paste a poster on the homes of people in quarantine after they had tested positive for the virus to make sure everyone in the neighbourhood was careful. It also deterred people from violating the quarantine.

But more than six months into the pandemic people were fully aware of COVID-19, the respiratory disease caused by the virus, and there was less need to publicise the cases, city officials said. Instead it was important to instil confidence in people to come forward and test themselves.

“There is a stigma with the coronavirus disease and posters outside the house amplify that. By doing away with this, we are aiming at increased testing. We want more people to get themselves tested without thinking of stigmas,” said Delhi environment minister Kailash Gehlot.

India’s total coronavirus cases stood at 7.12 million on Monday, health ministry data showed, behind only the United States which is approaching the 8 million mark.

The country recorded 66,732 new infections in the last 24 hours, a decline from last month’s highs, but still the world’s highest daily rise.

Deaths from COVID-19 infections rose by 816 to 109,150, the health ministry said.

Delhi makes up a little over 4% of India’s total caseload, the second highest after the western city of Pune, and ahead of Mumbai and Bengaluru.

Some residents in Delhi said that such was the fear over the disease that people tried to distance themselves from patients even after they had recovered.

“Discrimination is

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