Damage

Wisconsin Residents React to Damage Caused to Homes and Businesses During Chaotic Night In Wauwatosa

WAUWATOSA, Wisc. — A caravan of Black Lives Matter protesters had made it about 6 miles from Milwaukee to Wauwatosa Wednesday evening before being stopped by police in riot gear. Rioters in the crowd began to throw projectiles at the police line, prompting officers to deploy tear gas and pepper balls.

It was a scene that has been played out, too often, in American cities since late May, except this time it was not taking place in the downtown area of a major city. It was happening in residential neighborhoods. The protests were sparked after Wauwatosa officer Joseph Mensah was not charged in a shooting that led to the death of 17-year-old Alvin Cole. Cole was killed on February 2 when he opened fire on officers.

Prior to the confrontation, some in the BLM crowd had smashed windows or threw large rocks through windows of businesses along their path. Businesses damaged included a Kumon tutoring center and a dry cleaners, but rioters did not just target stores.

A small apartment complex was then targeted, with people again throwing rocks through the windows. This time other people in the crowd begged the agitators to stop because that was too far even for them. It only stopped after some ran up to prevent more destruction, but by then the damage was already done.

Jeff, the owner of the apartment complex, was busy at work Thursday morning to clean up the mess and was making the repairs to the building.

He told Townhall four people lived in one of the apartment complexes, but only one person was home at the time it was

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CoreLogic Risk Analysis Shows Hurricane Delta Threatens 293,685 Homes with Storm Surge Damage

—With striking similarities to Hurricane Laura, Hurricane Delta threatens the same coastal towns already struggling to recover—

CoreLogic® (NYSE: CLGX), a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released data analysis showing 293,685 single-family and multifamily homes across Louisiana and the U.S. Gulf Coast with a reconstruction cost value (RCV) of approximately $62.85 billion are at potential risk of storm surge damage from Hurricane Delta based on its projected Category 2 status at landfall. These estimates are based on the October 7, 5 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) National Hurricane Center forecast.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201008005338/en/

Hurricane Delta: Number of Homes at Storm Surge Risk and Associated Reconstruction Cost Value (Graphic: Business Wire)

“After battering the Yucatán Peninsula near Cancún, Mexico, Hurricane Delta is headed for the Gulf Coast just weeks after Hurricane Laura brought significant wind and storm surge damage to the Texas and Louisiana coastlines,” said Curtis McDonald, meteorologist and senior product manager of CoreLogic. “Residents in these coastal areas are already trying to recover from their losses and are now faced with a second substantial storm. This season has been relentless, and Louisianans should be prepared for the long recovery road ahead.”

As Hurricane Delta approaches the Gulf, its path will become more certain and the metropolitan areas at risk will narrow. For the most up-to-date storm surge exposure estimates, visit the CoreLogic natural hazard risk information center, Hazard HQ™, at www.hazardhq.com.

The primary threats as Hurricane Delta makes landfall in central Louisiana will be storm surge and damaging winds. Heavy rainfall is also expected, but a fast storm speed is expected to limit catastrophic inland flooding. CoreLogic catastrophe and weather experts expect the 2020 hurricane season to continue on its above-average trend given warmer oceanic

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Santa Rosa posts damage map with homes destroyed in Glass Fire

The city of Santa Rosa released a preliminary damage assessment map showing homes that were damaged or destroyed within the city limits by the Glass Fire.

The map displays home addresses and uses a color-coded system to show the degree of damage, from green (structure is safe to live in) to red (structure is destroyed and unsafe for habitation). The county will continue to add to the map as more homes impacted by the conflagration are identified.

Find the map here.

Cal Fire said in its Sunday night incident update that ground crews have now identified 235 destroyed homes in Sonoma County and 252 in Napa County. An additional 73 homes have been damaged in Sonoma County and 64 in Napa County.


Cal Fire Assistant Chief Billy See said in a Sunday morning press briefing that 12 inspection teams are on the ground assessing burn areas and about half of the fire zone has been surveyed.

More than 21,600 structures remain threatened in Napa and Sonoma counties.

The Glass Fire east of Santa Rosa had grown to nearly 65,000 acres with 26% containment as of Sunday night. Crews expanded containment lines as the gusty conditions subsided and a red flag warning for critical fire weather expired. Evacuations orders were reduced to warnings for multiple communities including Kenwood, Oakmont and Calistoga.

But while the fire’s eastern zone came under control, its northern edge burned actively and a new evacuation order was issued for north Napa County bordered on the west by Highway 29 at Livermore Road, on the north by the Lake County Line and on the east by Aetna Mine Road. A warning is in effect for the southern edge of Lake County.

Critically dry fuel (grasses, trees and brush) and very warm and dry weather conditions are contributing to

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Nearly 2 Million Homes at Elevated Risk of Wildfire Damage According to CoreLogic

As the Glass Fire burns and threatens Napa Valley, CoreLogic’s 2020 Wildfire Risk Report analyzes both single-family and multifamily homes currently at risk of wildfire damage in the most wildfire-prone states

CoreLogic® (NYSE: CLGX), a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its 2020 Wildfire Risk Report as smoky skies and poor air quality continue to burden cities up and down the West Coast. The report finds 1,975,116 homes1 in the United States with an associated reconstruction cost of more than $638 billion at elevated risk of wildfire damage. These homes are comprised of approximately 6.5% of the total number of single-family residences in these states.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200930005217/en/

Top 10 Metro Areas by Single-Family Residences at Risk (Graphic: Business Wire)

The Los Angeles metro area tops the list of metropolitan areas with the greatest single-family residences at wildfire risk, followed shortly thereafter by the Riverside and San Diego metro areas. California is home to 76% of these residences on the top 10 list—but the reconstruction cost value of these homes comprise nearly 84% of the list.

“2017 and 2018 were incredibly destructive, record setting years for wildfire, followed by a comparatively quieter 2019. When we talk about wildfire trends, it’s important to treat any decrease in fire activity as only temporary,” says Dr. Tom Jeffery, principal hazard scientist at CoreLogic. “Like most natural hazards, there is no reason to believe that the amount of wildfire acreage, or the number of homes in the path of future wildfires will be any less – and certainly the ongoing 2020 season is proof of that, well on its way to being among the most devastating in recent memory.”

The devastation in Oregon, Washington and California has

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Wildfire updates: Evacuations, damage in Northern California

Wildfires whipped by gusting winds forced evacuations for thousands of residents and warnings for others to be prepared to flee throughout Sunday night and early Monday in Napa, Sonoma, Butte and Shasta counties as firefighters battled several new blazes.

Neighborhoods in northeast Santa Rosa were ordered evacuated just before midnight as the Glass, Shady and Boysen fires continued to burn and spark new fires, and evacuation orders were expanded throughout Monday’s early morning hours both inside and outside of Santa Rosa city limits.

In Napa County, some structures burned overnight, including the Chateau Boswell winery and the Glass Mountain Inn, and Cal Fire was preparing for continued high winds through 9 p.m. Monday.

In Butte County, voluntary evacuations warnings remain in effect Monday morning in the towns of Paradise and Magalia, both of which were devastated by the Camp Fire two years ago, due to newly wind-whipped fires on the north flank of the North Complex fire near Highway 70 in the Feather River Canyon.

That blaze already sprinted at a furious pace earlier this month, during an earlier wind event, killing 15 people in communities just north of Lake Oroville. The large complex first ignited in mid-August by lightning.

And in Shasta County, the Zogg Fire that sparked Sunday afternoon has scorched at least 15,000 acres southwest of Redding, threatening rural communities of several hundred people, according to Cal Fire. The Zogg Fire, as of Monday morning, was not threatening the city of Redding, officials said.

Glass Fire: Growing list of evacuations for Santa Rosa, Calistoga

A group of wildfires in the Napa-Sonoma area collectively called the Glass Fire quadrupled in reported size between Sunday evening and Monday morning, from 2,500 acres to 11,000 acres, according to Cal Fire. It is now threatening more than 8,500 structures, most of

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