destroying

Glass fire 50% contained after destroying 600 homes in California’s Napa-Sonoma area

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — The devastating Glass fire burning in Napa and Sonoma counties is now halfway contained, with evacuation orders remaining in place for thousands while damage inspection teams continue to assess the wildfire’s extensive destruction, authorities say.



a group of fruit hanging from a tree: The vineyards at the Somerston Estate Winery & Vineyards, photographed on Wednesday, September 30, 2020 in St. Helena, California. Wineries like Somerston are forgoing a 2020 vintage due to the ongoing wildfire season, which has seen two major wildfires in the region so far.


© Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times/TNS
The vineyards at the Somerston Estate Winery & Vineyards, photographed on Wednesday, September 30, 2020 in St. Helena, California. Wineries like Somerston are forgoing a 2020 vintage due to the ongoing wildfire season, which has seen two major wildfires in the region so far.

Since igniting outside of Calistoga on Sept. 27 and growing intensely toward Santa Rosa in its first 48 hours due to heavy wind gusts, the fire has now consumed at least 600 homes, Cal Fire’s Sonoma-Lake-Napa unit said in a Tuesday morning incident update. The state fire agency reports the blaze is now 66,840 acres and 50% contained.

Emergency officials in the past few days have reduced some mandatory evacuation orders to voluntary warnings, including all of the cities of Calistoga and St. Helena, the Sonoma County community of Kenwood and some neighborhoods on the east side of Santa Rosa inside city limits.

But numerous other orders have remained in place for more than a week, and some newer orders, particularly in parts of northern Napa County near the Lake County line, have been issued as recently as Sunday afternoon. Cal Fire says more than 21,000 structures are still considered threatened.

Up-to-date evacuation information, including details about the repopulation process for evacuated residents, is posted regularly to the Nixle webpages for the Santa Rosa Police Department, the city of Calistoga, the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office and the Napa County Office of Emergency Services. Updates are also available via the social media pages for those entities and Cal Fire LNU.



a sign in front of a cloudy sky: The Glass fire in Napa County along CA-128 on Wednesday, September 30, 2020 in Calistoga, California.


© Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles

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Fires rampage through wine country, destroying numerous homes in Santa Rosa

SANTA ROSA, CA - SEPTEMBER 28: The Shady Fire impacts structures along CA-12 on Monday, Sept. 28, 2020 in Santa Rosa, CA. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times) <span class="copyright">(Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times)</span>
SANTA ROSA, CA – SEPTEMBER 28: The Shady Fire impacts structures along CA-12 on Monday, Sept. 28, 2020 in Santa Rosa, CA. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times) (Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times)

California wine country was devastated by yet another series of wildfires overnight as flames destroyed numerous homes and other buildings in Napa and Sonoma counties and thousands were forced to run for their lives in the darkness of night.

A number of homes began to burn early Monday in the suburban eastern neighborhoods of Santa Rosa. The city of 177,000 residents, Sonoma County’s most populous, was devastated three years ago by the Tubbs fire — also driven by strong winds — that destroyed about 1,500 homes in the northwestern Coffey Park neighborhood, which was mostly built in the 1980s.

On Monday, it was the suburban northeastern neighborhoods of Santa Rosa that were burning, this time from the Shady fire.

Whipped by powerful hot and dry Diablo winds coming from the north and east, which showered embers onto the city, flames engulfed houses in the area of Mountain Hawk Drive, which is lined with two-story tract homes in the Skyhawk development, built in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

The number of structures lost was still unclear.

Deer were seen fleeing as firefighters battled the flames before dawn Monday.

Large swaths of Santa Rosa were under mandatory evacuation orders. Districts in the city’s northeast were ordered to empty, including the neighborhoods of Calistoga, Skyhawk, Melita, Stonebridge, the Oakmont retirement community and Pythian.

Busloads of older people were evacuated from the Oakmont Gardens assisted-living community as flames could be seen in the distance. Elsewhere in the city, cars jammed narrow roads as residents heeded evacuation orders.

Two other fires were also burning upwind of the fire encroaching on Santa Rosa,

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