Director

Before Contractor Billed TARC For No Work, She Worked For MSD Director

A scathing report released last week revealed widespread misspending and sexual misconduct at Louisville’s public transit agency. Much of the report focused on then-executive director Ferdinand Risco’s relationship with a contractor who was paid more than $228,000 for no demonstrable work. 

That contractor previously worked for another top city official: Tony Parrott, the executive director of the Louisville Metropolitan Sewer District. When he worked in Cincinnati, Parrott paid the same contractor $3 million over five years, a deal one city councilman at the time called “unconscionable.” 

This is not a coincidence: Parrott introduced the contractor to Risco.

The referral came just months after an Ohio state audit revealed Parrott had misspent more than $750,000 on bloated, often unnecessary contracts during his time running Cincinnati MSD.

Risco was fired in February after sexual assault and harassment allegations from staff came to light.

The contractor that worked with Risco at TARC was not named in the report because she has accused him of sexual assault. But her attorney confirmed her identity, and the report makes it fairly clear who she is: the same woman who Parrott worked with closely for over a decade in Cincinnati. 

In a brief response to emailed questions, Parrott downplayed his role in connecting Risco and the contractor, saying it was simply a referral. He did not offer more details on why he would refer this specific contractor to TARC, or what services he thought she would be best suited to provide. 

Jean Porter, a spokesperson for Mayor Greg Fischer, also dismissed the concern, saying Parrott advised Fischer’s office that all he did was introduce Risco and the contractor at a “water equity task force meeting” years ago.

But the contractor told TARC investigators that Parrott was the one who initially reached out to her about an

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Watch Dogs Legion’s Director Takes Us Through Some of Its Final Improvements Before Launch

What a difference eight months can make in game development. Back in October of last year, Ubisoft announced that it was delaying Watch Dogs: Legion to an undisclosed date in 2020. The original release date had Legion releasing in March, right at the beginning of our current endless void where time has no meaning. Now, the next Watch Dogs is coming on Oct. 29 for a dizzying array of platforms: PC, PlayStation 4, PlayStation 5, Xbox One, Xbox Series S, Xbox Series X, and Google Stadia.

I previewed Watch Dogs: Legion three months ago, during what would normally have been E3. So returning to the game now, I didn’t expect to see much in the way of change. Surprisingly, Ubisoft has tweaked and improved Legion ahead of launch. It’s not a new game entirely, but even from the beginning of my demo I noticed changes.


A newly ray traced London awaits. | Mike Williams/USG, Ubisoft

For example, recruitment options have grown. In Watch Dogs: Legion, every generated character pulls from a pool of perks, having somewhere between zero and three available to them. (Yeah, some folks just fail the digital lottery.) There are new options like “Famous,” which sees that person get noticed in public and is probably not conductive to stealth; “Glass Cannon,” where a person both take and deal more damage; and “Flatulent,” where your chosen member will… sometimes fart and alert enemies to their presence. Some of the combinations don’t make any sense—how does a transient have a silenced MP5?—but making up stories to square those circles is part of the fun.

This is apparently the final suite of perks available to the character generation, according to Watch Dogs Legion creative director Clint Hocking. “Yeah, that’ll be the final mix. I mean it doesn’t mean you’ve seen

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Steelwork contractor appoints senior director

Severfield, Britain’s biggest construction steelwork contractor, has appointed Alun Griffiths as its senior independent director.

Thursday, 1st October 2020, 7:51 am

Updated Thursday, 1st October 2020, 7:58 am
Severfield recently completed its work on the redevelopment of Lords Cricket Ground

Mr Griffiths is currently chair of Severfield’s remuneration committee and joined the board in 2014.

Kevin Whiteman, chairman of Severfield, said: “I am delighted that Alun Griffiths has agreed to become thesenior independent director at Severfield.

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“Our board and other stakeholders will continue to benefit from Alun’s wide-ranging experience and insight.”

Last month Severfield said it was cautiously optimistic about the 2021 financial year despite the current market uncertainty caused by Covid-19.

The Thirsk-based group said its optimism stemmed from the strength of its order book, an encouraging pipeline of opportunities, a strong balance sheet position, its expertise in managing complex projects and its long-standing client relationships.

The firm told shareholders at its AGM: “We continue to be well-placed to win work in the diverse range of market sectors and geographies in which we operate and across a wide client base, providing us with extra resilience and the ability to increase our market share.”

The board recommended a final dividend for the year to March 31 of 1.8p per share, making a total for the year of 2.9p per share, up from 2.8p last year.

Severfield’s chief executive, Alan Dunsmore, said the dividend payment reflected the board’s confidence in the future.

The firm said its UK and European factories are fully operational, all construction sites are open and underlying operations are performing well.

Severfield recently completed its work on the redevelopment of Lords Cricket Ground (the Compton and Edrich stands) and it is now working on

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Tim Griffin, The Kitchen’s Director and Chief Curator, Steps Down

A search for Griffin’s successor is being conducted by Isaacson Miller.

Tim Griffin, The Kitchen's Director and Chief Curator, Steps Down

The Kitchen has announced that its director and chief curator, Tim Griffin, will be stepping down from the position at the end of this year.

During his tenure, Griffin organized with The Kitchen team significant projects by artists including Chantal Akerman, ANOHNI, Charles Atlas, Gretchen Bender, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Ralph Lemon, Aki Sasamoto, and Tyshawn Sorey, among many others, in addition to thematic exhibitions such as “From Minimalism into Algorithm.” The organization also developed new initiatives and programs including “The Kitchen L.A.B.,” an interdisciplinary discussion series which keyed thematic seasons since 2012; and the electronic music series “Synth Nights.” Following the spread of COVID-19, the organization also launched The Kitchen Broadcast and revised its residencies to operate with a TV studio model.

During the past two years, Griffin has focused on fundraising in anticipation of The Kitchen’s 50th anniversary in 2021 and the anticipated renovation of its building on 19th Street in Chelsea. The organization has raised approximately $11 million heading into a special benefit exhibition, “Ice and Fire,” which is curated by Kitchen board members Wade Guyton and Jacqueline Humphries and opens on October 1.

Griffin will continue as an advisor to ensure a smooth transition and on 50th anniversary initiatives, while taking a position as Visiting Associate Professor in the departments of Art History and English at the Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. His wife, Johanna Burton, is director of the Wexner Center for the Arts.

The Kitchen Chair of the Board Greg Feldman says: “All of us at The Kitchen express our gratitude to Tim for his remarkable leadership during the past decade as both a visionary curator and fundraiser, and at a key point in The Kitchen’s history.”

“I can’t imagine a more inspiring or

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