driving

Pandemic-shift: spike in savings diverted into housing driving national median home prices up 8.6%, according to Royal LePage | Nachricht

Despite second wave worries, the median price of a home in Canada forecast to finish year 7.0% higher than year-end 2019

  • Delayed spring market extends through Q3 as pent up demand fuels prices and sales
  • 97% of regions surveyed post price appreciation in third quarter despite economic shock of COVID-19
  • Ontario and Quebec real estate markets dominate list of highest appreciating regions, with Windsor in the top spot at 17.0%

TORONTO, Oct. 14, 2020 /CNW/ – According to the Royal LePage House Price Survey and Market Survey Forecast released today, the aggregate1 price of a home in Canada increased 8.6 per cent year-over-year to $692,964 in the third quarter, as high demand and low inventory continued to fuel a seller’s market.

The Royal LePage National House Price Composite is compiled from proprietary property data in 64 of the nation’s largest real estate markets. When broken out by housing type, the median price of a standard two-storey home rose 10.0 per cent year-over-year to $819,906, while the median price of a bungalow increased 7.0 per cent to $570,701. The median price of a condominium increased 5.3 per cent year-over-year to $510,365. Price data, which includes both resale and new build, is provided by Royal LePage’s sister company RPS Real Property Solutions, a leading Canadian real estate valuation company.

“Typical consumption patterns have been disrupted in 2020 as the pandemic has driven the household savings rate to levels not seen in decades,” said Phil Soper, president and CEO of Royal LePage. “Most Canadians have sharply reduced spending on discretionary goods and services involving a great deal of human interaction, and with mortgage rates at record lows, many have refocused on housing investments, be it renovations to accommodate work-from-home needs, a recreational property or a new

Continue Reading

DoD space agency driving Pentagon contractors to rethink their price points

Space Development Agency constellations of cheaper mass-produced satellites create opportunities and risks for contractors

WASHINGTON — The Space Development Agency is buying 20 communications satellites for about $14 million apiece, and eight missile-warning satellites for about $43 million per unit.

These price points are unprecedented in Pentagon satellite programs and a sign that the military space market could be headed in a different direction, said Bill Gattle, president of space systems at L3Harris.

L3Harris and SpaceX each received contracts on Monday to build four missile warning satellites for the Space Development Agency. Lockheed Martin and York Space in August won contracts to each produce 10 data-relay satellites. All must be delivered two years from now. 

Military satellites typically are made in onesies and twosies, take decades to develop and cost hundreds of millions of dollars each. The SDA constellations of cheaper mass-produced satellites are a “fundamental transformation” in how DoD buys space technology, Gattle told SpaceNews Oct. 6.

With SDA planning to buy hundreds more satellites in the coming years, “we’re all trying to figure out how to change the price point,” Gattle said.

DoD wants to build large constellations that cost less and also are reliable and deployed quickly, he said. “So all of us have really taken a hard look at how do we build these things? What drives the cost? Why do DoD exquisite systems cost so much?”

Gattle said L3Harris, like other companies, were caught off guard by the speed of SDA contracting. The company had planned to compete for the Transport Layer satellites that were awarded to Lockheed Martin and York Space, but it didn’t move quickly enough. 

“I don’t think we were as ready as we needed to be. And therefore we didn’t win,” he said. When the Tracking Layer opportunity for missile-warning satellites

Continue Reading

Consumers driving vessels to break status quo

Uniworld has more design ideas on the way, driven by consumers seeking an even more original boutique river cruise experience.

So said Ellen Bettridge, president and ceo, Uniworld Boutique River Cruise Collection during ‘Design Disruptors’, presented by Seatrade Cruise Brand Ambassador Ayesha Khan and sponsored by Bath Fitter at Seatrade Cruise Virtual.

‘Nothing is the same’, said Bettridge on the interior design of Uniworld’s river vessels, as she shared photographs of the artwork on display in Catherine and Antoinette and their hand crafted features. 

She went on to add that the vessels are original for having been ‘designed with a woman in mind’, demonstrated by storage spaces in bathrooms. 

‘[We’ve] certainly a few other ideas coming… [for] a luxury experience for the customer. It is the consumer driving this’, she added. 

Creating personality

Ponant’s ceo Americas, Navin Sawhney, said the cruise line’s Explorer Class ships ‘all have their own personality’ and capture lots of light so passengers ‘can enjoy the panorama in its fullest form.’ 

He described the vessels’ Blue Eye Lounge as ‘a feat of engineering’ that comprises 24 layers of glass glued together so passengers can see ‘in the ocean and the ocean floor.’ 

Sawhney concluded, ‘The idea here is to open the eye of the traveller’s mind… how this ocean exists and how we can continue to make it exist.’ 

Source Article

Continue Reading