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Young people return to their parents’ homes in the US due to COVID-19


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This article was translated from our Spanish edition using AI technologies. Errors may exist due to this process.


This story originally appeared on Alto Nivel

By Antonio Sandoval

For the first time in nine decades , young adults have returned to parental homes at a rate not seen since the Great Depression era of the 1930s , according to an analysis by the Pew Research Center with data from the United States Census Bureau.

The obvious cause was the loss of job or decrease in income that the pandemic brought with it. According to the source, at the end of July the total number of young adults who lived with one of their parents or with both grew to 26.6 million , which meant an increase of 2.6 million compared to February , just before the devastating impact of the pandemic in the world’s largest economy.

This measurement includes only young people between 18 and 29 years of age and, according to the figures, the phenomenon was highly concentrated in the segment of young people between 18 and 24 years of age, the age of greatest economic vulnerability in adulthood. In percentage terms, it means that 52 percent of young people in the analyzed age range , 18 to 29 years old, live with their parents, the highest rate since the Great Depression era.

In fact, the Pew Research Center indicates that this rate of 52 percent is already even higher than the 48 percent reported in 1940 during the end of the Great Depression and the entry of the United States into World War II, with no accurate figures. in the worst part of the economic crash of the 1930s, so the most recent measurement is in fact the largest ever observed in

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Contractors acquitted in 2008 case of labourer’s death due to negligence

A magistrate court last week acquitted two contractors in a case wherein a labourer had died and another had sustained grievous injuries after a slab fell over them from the second floor of an under-construction building in Vikhroli.

The FIR had been registered on the report of the injured labourer Puran Roy. Additional Chief Metropolitan Magistrate AA Ghaniwale said in his order that the prosecution had “miserably failed” to prove the guilt of the accused and that unfortunately, not a single labourer was examined by the prosecution. He also noted that the forensic report of samples of sand and stone that had been collected from the site had not come till date.

Further, the court said that in the absence of direct evidence against the accused…the said incident is an accident and not a rash or negligent act of the accused.

Offences had been registered against the building contractor Gulam Mustafa for not providing safety equipment to the labourers, Centering Contractor Pradip Choudhari – for not providing proper support to the slab and Engineer Tarik Bansode – for not verifying whether safety equipment was provided. The case against the engineer was separated since he remained absent for long.

Offences had been registered under the IPC for causing death by negligence and causing grievous hurt by endangering life or safety of others – both punishable with up to two years imprisonment.

The developer of the building who had hired the contractor had appeared as a prosecution witness. He had told the court that all safety equipment had been provided and the incident was a pure accident. He also told the court that work was over that day and all labourers had left before the incident occurred. Also a previous contractor with the developer testified that the labourers were not working there,

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Homes sold two weeks faster in September due to unusual surge in demand

  • It took just 54 days to sell a home in September. That is the shortest time since realtor.com began tracking this metric in 2016. Back then it took 78 days.
  • The median price of a home sold in September was $350,000, up just over 11% annually.



a person standing in front of a building: People walk into a house for sale in Floral Park, Nassau County, New York, the United States, on Sept. 6, 2020. Home buyers eying for cozy backyards and more office space are staging bidding wars in the suburbs surrounding New York City amid the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic.


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People walk into a house for sale in Floral Park, Nassau County, New York, the United States, on Sept. 6, 2020. Home buyers eying for cozy backyards and more office space are staging bidding wars in the suburbs surrounding New York City amid the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Homebuyers hoping that a seasonal slowdown in the housing market would dampen rising prices can forget about it.

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More buyers piled into the fray in September, spurred by record-low mortgage rates and a pandemic-induced stay-at-home culture, pushing sales to an even faster pace.

In the first read on September demand, homes sold 12 days faster than they did a year ago, according to realtor.com. Homes usually sell 25% faster in September than at the start of the year, but this year they sold 39% faster.

It took just 54 days to sell a home during the month. That is the shortest time since realtor.com began tracking this metric in 2016. Back then it took 78 days.

Regionally, properties in the Northeast spent 13 fewer days on the market than last year, while those in the South sold 11 days faster. In the Midwest it took nine fewer days to sell a home and seven fewer in the West. In the 50 largest metropolitan housing markets, the typical home sold in 44 days, 10 days faster than last year.

“Many buyers tend to put their home search on hold after the start of the school year, but remote learning and

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