duo

American duo win Nobel prize in economics for improvements to auction theory

A Nobel Prize medal
A Nobel Prize medal

Americans Paul R Milgrom and Robert B Wilson have won the Nobel Prize in economics for “improvements to auction theory and inventions of new auction formats”.

The winners were announced in Stockholm by Goran Hansson, secretary-general of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

The award caps a week of Nobel Prizes at a time when much of the world is experiencing the worst recession since the Second World War and because of the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

Technically known as the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, the award was established in 1969 and is now widely considered one of the Nobel prizes.

Last year’s award went to two researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a third from Harvard University, for their groundbreaking research into efforts to reduce global poverty.

Few economists could have predicted last autumn that the globe would come to a virtual standstill within months, as governments closed their borders, imposed lockdowns and ordered other measures to stop the spread of Covid-19, triggering a sharp dip in business activity worldwide.

The prestigious award comes with a 10 million krona (£840,000) cash prize and a gold medal.

Last week, the Nobel Committee awarded the prize for physiology

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A Surprisingly Simple Fish Dish From a High-Concept Design Duo

The kitchen of Glenn Pushelberg and George Yabu’s spare, light-filled house in Amagansett, N.Y., is defined by glass. Five panels of the stuff separate the couple’s gray quartz-topped counters from the otherwise open-plan living and dining area on the home’s second floor; a particularly Covid-weary guest might mistake it for a high-concept sneeze guard. But for Yabu, who along with Pushelberg co-owns the architecture and design firm Yabu Pushelberg — perhaps best known for its projects with the Edition hotel group and Barneys New York — it was a necessary design choice to achieve the energy he craves when entertaining the guests that often fill the house.

“It keeps the conversations from interfering with each other, but you’re still engaged with your friends in the living room while you’re doing your thing in the kitchen,” Yabu explains. “You don’t want to disturb the chi of the socialization going on.” Pushelberg initially balked at the idea of making the kitchen so visible, but now enjoys the way visitors tend to congregate at this end of the house while he’s cooking.

At the far side of the room, wraparound floor-to-ceiling windows uninterrupted by columns offer a panoramic view of the Atlantic Ocean. While the building, whose structure comprises three stacked rectangular boxes, might look simple, it took the couple three and a half years to build; like many of their designs, it exemplifies the type of minimalism that conveys a sense of ease but requires inspired feats of engineering to create. “The most satisfying projects are your own,” Pushelberg says. “If you take your time, give some latitude to your schedule and your budget, and realize that you’re going to make a few little mistakes, it can be a very satisfying and happy experience.”

One of the couple’s favorite dishes to make

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OUR NEIGHBORS | Job Corps kitchen duo says cooking for others can be form of love | Features

Barbara Bishop and Carol Laster believe cooking food for others can be an expression of love, and when you cook for hundreds of people a day, there’s a lot of love to go around.

Bishop, 63, and Laster, 61, both of Manhattan, have each worked in the Flint Hills Job Corps Center’s kitchen for more than 20 years.

Bishop began working part time at the Job Corps, a technical education training program, in 1997 after she retired from the military. She and her husband became stationed at Fort Riley in 1991, though both are from Arkansas, and have stayed in the area over since. Over the years, Bishop eventually worked up to becoming the kitchen manager.

Laster, the lead cook, initially began working at the Job Corps around 1993. The Baltimore, Maryland, native said she initially moved to the area in the early 90s to be closer to a family member. There were a couple years in between that she worked elsewhere, she said, but she returned to the Job Corps afterward.

Bishop is responsible for overseeing the overall management of the kitchen and helping where needed, and Laster executes the ideas and day-to-day cooking with the help of four other kitchen staff.

“We have students here from all walks of life and most will tell me what they like to eat or what they eat in their country, and they just give me a recipe,” Laster said. “They just give me an idea for it and I just research and make it.”

Before the pandemic, the kitchen staff served about 600 people a day for breakfast, lunch, dinners and snacks. Now, however, they serve about 75 because fewer students are living on campus. While Bishop said she can’t wait to reopen fully and see everyone, she is taking advantage

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OUR NEIGHBORS | Job Corps kitchen duo | Features

Barbara Bishop and Carol Laster believe cooking food for others can be an expression of love, and when you cook for hundreds of people a day, there’s a lot of love to go around.

Bishop, 63, and Laster, 61, both of Manhattan, have each worked in the Flint Hills Job Corps Center’s kitchen for more than 20 years.

Bishop began working part time at the Job Corps, a technical education training program, in 1997 after she retired from the military. She and her husband became stationed at Fort Riley in 1991, though both are from Arkansas, and have stayed in the area over since. Over the years, Bishop eventually worked up to becoming the kitchen manager.

Laster, the lead cook, initially began working at the Job Corps around 1993. The Baltimore, Maryland, native said she initially moved to the area in the early 90s to be closer to a family member. There were a couple years in between that she worked elsewhere, she said, but she returned to the Job Corps afterward.

Bishop is responsible for overseeing the overall management of the kitchen and helping where needed, and Laster executes the ideas and day-to-day cooking with the help of four other kitchen staff.

“We have students here from all walks of life and most will tell me what they like to eat or what they eat in their country, and they just give me a recipe,” Laster said. “They just give me an idea for it and I just research and make it.”

Before the pandemic, the kitchen staff served about 600 people a day for breakfast, lunch, dinners and snacks. Now, however, they serve about 75 because fewer students are living on campus. While Bishop said she can’t wait to reopen fully and see everyone, she is taking advantage

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San Marcos police looking for duo after hardware store theft – News – Austin American-Statesman

Police are looking for a man and a woman who stole a large amount of electrical wiring from a Lowe’s Home Improvement store in San Marcos on Sept. 13.

The pair left in a gray four-door car, San Marcos police said in a Monday Facebook post. Police also provided photos of the man they believe was responsible for the theft in their social media post.

Authorities said the man, who is wearing a blue shirt, light blue pants and white athletic shoes in police photos, had an ankle monitor on his left leg. The device is commonly used by law enforcement probation and parole departments.

San Marcos police said they are waiting for responses from multiple probation and parole departments for possible identification of the man in the photos.

“It is possible this suspect is not from San Marcos and may have traveled here to commit this crime. The likelihood of this is certainly increased, given our location on the (Interstate 35) corridor,” police said in the Facebook post.

The man in the photos has identifiable tattoos, including two lightning bolts on his left arm, and a skull on his left calf.

Police said the woman who joined the man in the theft appeared to have been dyeing her hair to a darker color.

Those who may have information regarding the incident or the identity of those believed to be responsible are asked to call San Marcos police at 512-754-2217 or email [email protected]

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