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Texas taps federal funds to help nursing homes buy equipment to expand COVID-era visits

AUSTIN — State officials announced Friday they will help nursing homes tap $3.5 million in federal funds to buy equipment that would allow more visitors during the coronavirus pandemic.

Starting Monday, certified nursing homes in Texas can apply for up to $3,000 each toward purchasing plexiglass barriers for expanded indoor visits and tents to accommodate more safe gatherings outdoors, Gov. Greg Abbott and the Health and Human Services Commission announced.

Texas has 1,213 such homes, said commission spokeswoman Christine Mann.

The $3.5 million is part of a bigger pool of funds the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services took in after slapping fines on nursing homes that violate federal rules, officials said.

The move comes a few weeks after Abbott announced plans – which took effect Sept. 24 – for up to two “essential caregivers” to resume indoor visits, provided they’ve tested negative for COVID-19 in the last two weeks. Those visits are allowed without a plexiglass divider, as the caregivers do things such as clean hearing aids.

But the state is still requiring relatives and visitors who are not essential caregivers to be separated from the resident at all times by a plexiglass barrier.

Such visits are only allowed in a county with a COVID-19 positivity rate of 10% or less.

Cindy Goleman walks up to the window of her mother Peggy White from outside the window at The Pavilion at Creekwood, a healthcare and rehabilitation center in Mansfield, Texas on Tuesday, March 24, 2020. Peggy White had a stroke in late January. Cindy Goleman is one of those people with parents and/or loved ones in nursing homes, hospitals or skilled healthcare facilities who can't visit in person. Goleman visits by looking through the window as she talks to her on the phone. (Vernon Bryant/The Dallas Morning News)

The head of a leading nursing home trade group welcomed the state-administered federal stipends, saying “providers understand the importance” of resuming visits.

“Everyone wants to see this work,” said Kevin Warren, president of the Texas Health Care Association.

But one advocate of more rapidly expanded family visits, Mary Nichols of Forney, the state needs to stop foot-dragging by some nursing homes on allowing designated caregiver visits.

“If a facility gets $3,000, I hope they spend it all on tents — because I don’t approve of the plexiglass

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Good Neighbor to remodel, expand kitchen

A migrant girl enjoys lunch Thursday at Good Neighbor Settlement House in Brownsville. (Ryan Henry/The Brownsville Herald)

Knocking down walls, expanding, buying new ovens, microwaves and prep tables are now in the works at the Good Neighbor Settlement House after the non-profit received a grant of $175,000 through the Valley Baptist Legacy Foundation that will help with the expansion and improvement of their kitchen.

Hugo Zurita, executive director at the Good Neighbor Settlement House, said the grant was much needed since the kitchen has never been remodeled and does not hold enough space to have prep tables and other applianches such as ovens that would make it easier to serve healthier options to the community.

“We approached them and applied for it because our meal program is the heart of our organization, that’s what we’re known for providing breakfast, lunch and dinner for the community here in Brownsville,” he said.

“Our kitchen is pretty small, is not the biggest and is not suited for us to be able to do bigger meals and cook more, so just having one stove that worked at that time was really difficult for us to be able to feed so many individuals. Our numbers did double through our meal program during the pandemic, so we were really happy that we were really happy that we were able to get those funds.”

Zurita said the plan is to be able to better assist the community with their needs. The remodelation will also include an expansion to the kitchen pantry, allowing the Good Neighbor to take more donations and have them organized for faster access.

“The plan is to be able to better assist our community so we don’t have an oven, so now we are able to purchase ovens to be able to bake stuff

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