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Uber and Lyft faced tough questions from California judges as they seek to keep classifying drivers as contractors



Dara Khosrowshahi, Logan Green are posing for a picture: Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi and Lyft CEO Logan Green Laura Buckman/Reuters; Carlo Allegri/Reuters


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Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi and Lyft CEO Logan Green Laura Buckman/Reuters; Carlo Allegri/Reuters

  • A California appeals court heard arguments on Tuesday from Uber and Lyft as they appeal a recent ruling that would force the companies to reclassify drivers as employees.
  • A lower court determined in August that Uber and Lyft drivers are employees, not contractors, under the state’s gig work law, AB-5, but delayed enforcing the ruling while the companies appeal it.
  • Uber, Lyft, and other gig companies have fought AB-5 aggressively, pouring more than $180 million into a ballot measure aimed at California voters that would permanently exempt them from the law.
  • The companies argue reclassifying drivers as employees will reduce their flexibility, while proponents of AB-5 say Uber and Lyft’s business models rely on underpaying drivers and skirting labor laws. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A California appeals court heard oral arguments Tuesday from Uber, Lyft, and the state over whether a lower court reached the right conclusion in August when it ruled that the companies’ drivers are employees under the state’s gig work law, AB-5.

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Judges from California’s first district Court of Appeal pressed lawyers for Uber and Lyft over drivers’ wages and autonomy, and questioned the companies’ arguments that AB-5 would require them to reduce drivers’ flexibility, according to The Washington Post and The New York Times reporter Kate Conger.

The judges also asked a lawyer for the state about potential harms to Uber and Lyft and drivers’ preferences around their employment status, according to reports.

The landmark case could fundamentally alter the contractor-based business model that Uber and Lyft have relied on, and the companies are aggressively fighting the law in court and via a ballot measure that California voters will decide on in

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Australian writer reveals the strange culture shocks she faced while living in America

An Australian writer who has spent months living in the United States has shared the noticeable differences between the two countries, including how you pay for petrol, use public bathrooms and buy alcohol.

Madolline Gourley, 30, from Brisbane, Queensland, runs an online blog called One Cat At A Time, and prior to the coronavirus lockdown, spent more than two years cat sitting for families in the States.

During those lengthy stays she became acutely aware of the way Americans live their day-to-day lives and how it differs from the Australian lifestyle, from road rules to adding tax to every purchase you make.

So what are the main variances? 

Madolline Gourley runs an online blog called One Cat At A Time , and prior to the coronavirus lockdown, spent more than two years cat sitting for families in the States

Madolline Gourley runs an online blog called One Cat At A Time , and prior to the coronavirus lockdown, spent more than two years cat sitting for families in the States

1. Pay for petrol before filling up 

In Madolline’s experience Australians will always put petrol in the car first before paying at the counter, so the station attendant knows how much gas they’ve taken.  

But in the US customers swipe their EFTPOS card, enter their postcode – also called a ZIP code – and then start to fill the car up.  

‘Or you can walk into the service station and pay cash, but you still have to pay before you can fill up,’ she told FEMAIL.

‘You can also select $50 when doing the EFTPOS transaction, but if your car only takes $33, $25, or $41.90, you only get billed for that. Not the $50. 

‘This confused me a lot to begin with because I was concerned I was being billed for the full amount.’

In Madolline's experience Australians will always put petrol in the car first before paying at the counter, so the station attendant knows how much gas they've taken (stock image)

In Madolline’s experience Australians will always put petrol in the car first before paying at the counter, so the station attendant knows how much gas they’ve

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