facilities

Mitsubishi Power Completes Renovation of Generating Facilities at Otake Geothermal Power Station

YOKOHAMA, Japan, Oct 5, 2020 – (JCN Newswire) – Mitsubishi Power, a major subsidiary of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) Group, has completed its renovation of the Otake Geothermal Power Station (Kokonoe-machi, Oita Prefecture) operated by Kyushu Electric Power Company. Commercial operation of the renovated facility began in October 2020. The stable electric power supply generated by the highly efficient and reliable steam turbine installed as part of this renovation project will curb CO2 emissions, and contribute to a decarbonized economy.

This renovation project was conducted under an engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) contract by a joint venture comprising Mitsubishi Power, which supplied the steam turbine, Mitsubishi Power Industries Co., Ltd., which handled the supply and installation of auxiliary equipment, and Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, which supplied the generator and electrical facilities.

The power generation system utilizes a “double flash and dual pressure” method, the first of its type in Japan. This allows for stable operation of the steam well and efficient use of geothermal resources, and has increased the power output by two megawatts (MW) compared to the previous facility, to 14.5MW. Construction was completed two months ahead of schedule from the plan when work began in May 2019, allowing for the start of commercial operation in October.

In the double flash and dual pressure method, high pressure primary steam from a powerful production well, and low-pressure secondary steam from a weak production well, are supplied to the steam turbine. Steam is further obtained by lowering the pressure of the hot water extracted from the primary steam, which is then used as secondary steam.

Geothermal energy utilizes the heat energy of the magma chamber inside the earth, and because no combustion takes place above ground, little CO2 is emitted into the atmosphere, making it an effective method of power generation for

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Two Toronto nursing homes are the hardest hit LTC facilities by COVID-19 in Ontario, according to latest report

Two nursing homes in Toronto appear to be among the hardest hit long-term-care facilities by a COVID-19 outbreak, in the latest numbers released by the province Saturday morning.

The 108-bed Fairview Nursing Home, near Dufferin Street and Dundas Street West, reported 42 residents and 12 staff members testing positive, making it Ontario’s largest active outbreak at an LTC home. Less than five deaths have been reported, although it’s not clear why there isn’t a more exact figure.

The 130-bed Vermont Square nursing home on Bathurst Street, north of Bloor Street West, reported an active outbreak with 35 confirmed cases — 25 residents and 10 staff. No deaths have been reported there.

The province has a total of 45 LTC homes with active coronavirus outbreaks, according to its latest data Saturday morning.

An active COVID-19 outbreak indicates that the home has at least one lab confirmed case of COVID-19 (in resident or staff) and the local public health unit or the home has declared an outbreak.

Other homes with major outbreaks in the province include the 242-bed Extendicare West End Villa in Ottawa with 18 residents infected, 19 deaths and 32 staff testing positive; the 60-bed Norwood Nursing Home in Toronto (12 infected residents; less than five deaths and six staff); and 200-bed Yee Hong Centre in Markham (seven residents, less than five deaths and less than five staff).

Akrit Michael

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Newsom signs law requiring skilled nursing homes to report disease-related deaths within 1 day, after COVID-19 pandemic ravaged facilities

With skilled nursing homes hit particularly hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, Gov. Gavin Newsom on Tuesday signed a law requiring those facilities in California to report disease-related deaths to health authorities within 24 hours during declared emergencies.

The law was written in response to concerns that health agencies were slow to respond to outbreaks in skilled nursing facilities because they did not receive timely information about them.

So far, more than 5,630 residents and staff at skilled nursing facilities in the state have died from COVID-19 — 36% of California’s fatalities from the coronavirus. The percentage “reveals the significant weaknesses in the reporting system currently required by these facilities,” said Assemblyman Jim Wood (D-Healdsburg), who introduced the legislation.

COVID-19 outbreaks have occurred at some 1,164 skilled nursing homes and 379 assisted-living facilities in California, according to the state Department of Public Health. The spread at such facilities is alarming to health officials, who note that the virus is especially deadly for the elderly and for those with underlying medical problems.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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