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Fire crews in Angwin fight flames along Hwy 29 and save homes amid Glass Fire

ANGWIN, Calif. (KGO) — Fire crews were holding the eastern flank of the Glass Fire on Thursday night.

Bulldozers and an army of fire engines from up and down the West Coast, lined up along Highway 29 where it winds up through a forest, north of Calistoga.

“On this portion, the fire behavior is calm and the winds are in our favor,” said Kyle Breaw, who is part of a Calfire hand crew out of Santa Clara, charged with ensuring the flames don’t cross the dozer line and highway.

RELATED: Glass Fire updates: Wildfire grows to 60,000 acres, more than 220 homes burn in Napa, Sonoma counties

“The importance of holding it,” Breaw said, “is so it doesn’t cross over and burn into a new section or burn other homes.”

South in the community of Angwin, firefighters fought back flames for a second time this week, leaving smoldering fires next to days old burn scars.

“What we’ve had here today, what we’ve experienced on several fires this year is an area burns through what we call a dirty burn, where you have a lot of burned areas, but also a lot of unburned areas. The change in the wind and remaining high heat allows for the fire to come back through a second time,” said Acting Vallejo Fire Captain, Kevin Brown.

Brown says a team of fire crews stopped flames, which raced up an overgrown hill Thursday, alongside a winery on Bell Canyon Road.

“We’ve been working down in this drainage for hours. Fire was gaining steam as it made that uphill run towards us.”

WATCH: Glass Fire moves dangerously close to Angwin; wind a concern for firefighters in Sonoma Co.

Brown says their crew called for air support, which saved the property along with hours of chainsaw and yard

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Two rival concrete contractors fight over past debts: Bay Village Police Blotter

Bay Village, Ohio

Found dog

On Sept. 21 a dog owner reported that when he went into a local coffee shop, his nine-month-old, black and tan Belgian Malinois, jumped out of the window of his parked car and took off running. Bay Village Animal Control was called to assist. Luckily, an employee at a nearby retirement home came across the dog and was able to capture it unharmed. The dog was returned to a grateful owner.

Bay Village city logo

Spring is in the air, so Bay Village police find they have to remind residents of the city’s regulations regarding pets.

Altercation, Knickerbocker Road

On Sept. 25 a physical altercation was reported. Officers arrived and found that two rival concrete contractors, working just a few houses away from each other, had gotten into a physical altercation. Officers spoke with the men and found that there was bad blood between the 51-year-old Cleveland man and the 42-year-old Parma man over past debts. Officers also received conflicting stories about who started the fight, which left one of the men bloodied. Possible charges are pending.

Distracted driver, Lake Road

On Sept. 26 officers received multiple phone calls regarding a car that was being operated erratically. The car was travelling at slow speeds, was weaving and had crossed the double yellow line numerous times. Officers were able to stop the driver near Cahoon Road. They spoke with the elderly driver who told officers that she was receiving multiple phone calls on her phone and through her bluetooth and she was unsure how to terminate the calls. She was strongly advised to not drive while distracted and to maintain full time and attention to the road.

Thefts

Bay Village Police continue to seek help from residents regarding car thefts and theft from auto reports. During the past week, 17

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Joe Gruters and Chris Sprowls fight minimum wage amendment

TALLAHASSEE – Two state Republican leaders added their voices Monday in opposition to a proposed constitutional amendment that would gradually boost the minimum wage to $15 an hour in Florida.

Republican Party of Florida Chairman Joe Gruters, a state senator from Sarasota, and incoming House Speaker Chris Sprowls, R-Palm Harbor, described the ballot initiative as “a Trojan horse,” “a trap door” and “a wolf in sheep’s clothing” that will bring to Florida “failed policies” from liberal cities where streets are “covered in poverty, riots, crime.”

“Voting ‘no’ on Amendment 2 may save your favorite restaurant from closing, or your favorite waiter or waitress from losing their job,” Sprowls, who will become House speaker after the November elections, said during an online press event with a top lobbyist for the restaurant and hotel industry.

Gruters, a certified public accountant, contended the state’s current minimum wage is primarily for entry-level positions and that the ballot measure would destroy hundreds of small businesses across Florida.

“This is not about siding with corporations, it’s about siding with Florida families,” Gruters said. “If you want to give individuals opportunities in the future to get those entry-level positions, like one of the interns in my office who started at minimum wage, and I’m lucky to keep him at $20 an hour in just under a year and a half.”

But prominent Orlando attorney John Morgan, who has spearheaded the drive to pass the amendment, disputed that a minimum-wage increase would result in layoffs or reduced worker hours, as opponents argue.

Attorney John Morgan.

“When they say this is going to force people to lay off people, think about this for a minute: what they’re saying is that right now, all these businesses have people working there that they don’t really need,” Morgan

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