foundation

$3.75 Million CAGC Foundation Grant to Aid Contractors In North Carolina

CHARLOTTE, N.C., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Carolinas AGC is excited to announce the opening of the CAGC Foundation Grant to help contractors with coronavirus mitigation efforts in the construction workplace. The grant was one of many allocations to state and local government agencies and nonprofits named in HB 1105 that appropriated the remaining CARES funding for pandemic relief. CAGC’s lobbying team garnered the major legislative victory during a recent legislative session and developed grant guidance and an application for qualified businesses and organizations that have a business office in North Carolina. The grant application period is open through Wednesday, October 28th at 5:00pm, and grants will be made on a first-come, first-serve basis to eligible subgrantees. Funding must be spent by December 30, 2020.

The legislation stipulates that $3 million of the grant funds are to be awarded to construction businesses and non-profits that reside in North Carolina for staffing and equipment needed to screen and protect individuals in the workplace, the purchase of personal protective equipment for individual worker use while on a jobsite, rapid response testing kits, implementing computer or smartphone applications that enable workers to answer daily screening questions before reporting to the jobsite, purchase of jobsite sanitization equipment for use in disinfecting jobsites, mental health support, and other pandemic-related safety gear for construction workers. The remaining $750,000 will be awarded to media organizations or other entities that can provide multi-lingual education, training, and community outreach programs using various media to reach construction workers, including those who lack proficiency in the English language.

For more information, grant guidelines, eligibility and to complete the application, visit www.cagc.org/PPEGrant.

Carolinas AGC is the construction industry association in the Carolinas, bringing value to our thousands of members through networking, government relations, job leads, meetings with

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Finding the right contractor is key to replacing foundation

Tim Carter
 |  Tribune Content Agency

Ask the Builder

Q: I’m thinking of buying a house that has a crawlspace. The foundation is in very bad shape. Although the house looks quite bad, it’s got good bones. Is it possible to completely remove a bad foundation and install a new, taller one? What’s involved? Who does this type of work? What would you make sure gets done if you’re going to all this work? — Hanna S., Hartford, Conn.

A: Anybody buying such a dilapidated house needs to negotiate a really good deal. The good news is that the old foundation can be removed and replaced with a new cast-concrete foundation, creating a full basement. The task is not much different than eating an elephant. You just take one bite at a time.

Hanna’s question reminded me of a fascinating time early in my building career. Fresh out of college, I had just rehabbed my first house in Cincinnati. It didn’t need a new foundation, but it was otherwise in pretty bad shape. Four months of work transformed the house back to its former glory.

About a half-mile away, a developer wanted to put in a small shopping mall, but there were about 10 houses and an apartment building in the way. Not only did he buy all these properties, but he also proceeded to move them about a mile away on some wooded land he bought at the end of a street. I remember watching these houses, and parts of houses that were cut in half, creeping down the road to their new foundations.

Hanna needs to contact different foundation contractors to see which ones have done exactly what she wants to do. Not all foundation contractors have the expertise to work underneath a house that’s suspended above the

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Ask the Builder: Replacing a foundation can be done, but find the right contractor

Q. I’m thinking of buying a house that has a crawlspace. The foundation is in very bad shape. While the house looks quite bad, it’s got good bones. Is it possible to completely remove a bad foundation and install a new, taller one? What’s involved? Who does this type of work? What would you make sure gets done if you’re going to all this work? – Hanna S., Hartford, Connecticut

A. Anybody buying such a dilapidated house needs to negotiate a really good deal. The good news is that the old foundation can be removed and replaced with a new cast-concrete foundation, creating a full basement. The task is not much different from eating an elephant. You just take one bite at a time.

Hanna’s question reminded me of a fascinating time early in my building career. Fresh out of college, I had just rehabbed my first house in Cincinnati. It didn’t need a new foundation, but it was otherwise in pretty bad shape. Four months of work transformed the house back to its former glory.

About a half-mile away, a developer wanted to put in a small shopping mall, but there were about 10 houses and an apartment building in the way. Not only did he buy all these properties, but he proceeded to move them about a mile away on some wooded land he bought at the end of a street. I remember watching these houses, and parts of houses that were cut in half, creeping down the road to their new foundations.

Hanna needs to contact different foundation contractors to see which ones have done exactly what she wants to do. Not all foundation contractors have the expertise to work underneath a house that’s suspended above the work site, sitting on cribbing made with timbers the size

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Salt Lake Temple renovation reaches ‘hardest stage’ with work on foundation underway

SALT LAKE CITY — Temple Square already looks vastly different than it did nine months ago when crews began the massive Salt Lake Temple renovation project.

Gone are the majority of temple add-ons constructed in the 1960s, such as the north side entrance, chapel and sealing room addition, and nearly all objects that were located in the space north and south of the temple. Other buildings, such as the South Visitors’ Center, were demolished in January.

There’s also a large pit surrounding the historic structure after crews created a retaining wall around it as they work to strengthen the temple’s foundation.

“The next stage is probably the hardest, where we work on strengthening the foundation by adding to the foundation,” said Andy Kirby, director of historic temple renovations for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, in a video released by the church Sunday.

The story of the temple’s foundation

While crews work on shoring up the building for seismic activity, they also get an up-close view of the temple’s foundation. It’s the first time a majority of the foundation has been visible since additions were constructed more than 50 years ago.

The history of that foundation is about as unique as the temple’s entire construction story — a structure that took 40 years to complete after its 1853 groundbreaking ceremony.

The location of the temple itself was set aside on July 28, 1847, just four days after pioneers reached the Salt Lake Valley. The groundbreaking happened in 1853 with the cornerstones laid on April 6, 1853, as a part of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ spring general conference.

A recap of the ceremony was recorded in an edition of the Deseret News published 10 days later. The ceremony included talks, prayers and music as the

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