garden

Appleton Eagle Scout completes major UWO Fox Cities campus community garden renovation

Though it’s near the end of the growing season, a large community garden on the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, Fox Cities campus is shining brightly as 15 years of overgrowth was removed and new fencing installed.

Garden beautification efforts―two years in the making―were led by Eagle Scout candidate Elijah Eisen, 17, a junior at Appleton North High School, along with support from Bill Bultman, an emeritus faculty member and Rose Marie Lewis, senior technician on the UWO Fox Cities campus.

Eisen provided much-needed tender loving care to the area and installed new fencing to keep deer and other animals at bay. The garden plots allow individuals and families in the community to grow their own food and flowers. The previous fencing was missing and broken and allowed deer to feast on the garden “like a buffet,” according to gardeners.

With various delays―not the least included the coronavirus pandemic―Eisen is happy the project has finally been completed. He says he was 14 years old when he started planning the garden updates. He had talked to Lewis, unofficial scouting coordinator on campus, about potential Eagle Scout projects.

“Since the beginning, this (Eagle Scout) was my goal,” Eisen said. “I didn’t feel I  accomplished it if I did something small. I wanted one of the biggest projects she had.”

Though Eisen wondered really how hard the project to put up an eight-foot wire fence could be, he soon learned it would take hundreds of volunteer hours digging through layers of clay―and a lot of money.

Pushing through

“I was very up front with him (Eisen) about the scope and complexity of the project, but he has proven to be a very capable and diligent scout,” said Lewis, senior laboratory prep technician at the UWO Fox Cities campus.

Lewis, herself an Eagle Scout mom,

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Growing the right herbs adds flavor and spice to the garden and the kitchen

Carol Cloud Bailey, Special to TCPalm
Published 10:30 a.m. ET Oct. 7, 2020

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John Coykendall of Blackberry Farm gives us his top picks—and shares the most common herb-gardening mistake.

Time Food & Wine

Herb gardening is a popular pursuit. Many gardeners and cooks have at least a few pots of herbs sitting around. What if this year, you plant a portion of the veggie garden, a new landscape bed, or several large containers with herbs?

Herbs add flavor and spice, pun intended, to our kitchens and gardens. They have many uses from the well known seasoning to infused vinegar for salads and household cleaning to tinctures and homemade incense. Some even attract butterflies. Planting and growing herbs is satisfying and productive.

The procedure for growing herbs is akin to growing vegetables. Wherever there are six to eight hours of sun and a source of water, herb gardens can be installed. For container gardens, just about any container can be used to grow herbs if it has drainage, let your imagination go. The soil should be fresh and clean and well drained. A 40-pound bag of potting soil is a quick way to set up a garden Just cut a few holes in the bottom and the bag will grow an herb garden. One full of fennel, parsley, and garlic chives is as useful to butterflies as it is to your kitchen.

For in-ground gardens, full sun and good drainage are best. The garden can be set up in traditional garden rows or employ a more intricate planting scheme such a complex herb knot garden. Check out the Herb Society of America and the University of Florida’s gardening page on herbs for more information.

Here are a few tips, tricks, and ideas about individual herbs and growing herbs to get

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Brothers Bar and Grill is reopening in an 8,000-square-foot space that now includes a beer garden and kitchen

Brothers Bar and Grill is new and improved, and ready to reopen in Milwaukee. 



a store filled with lots of graffiti: Brothers Bar and Grill is reopening at 1213 N. Water St. on Oct. 8. It is twice the size of its previous space and now has a full kitchen, 45 TVs, outdoor beer garden and more.


© Jordyn Noennig
Brothers Bar and Grill is reopening at 1213 N. Water St. on Oct. 8. It is twice the size of its previous space and now has a full kitchen, 45 TVs, outdoor beer garden and more.

The Water Street bar closed in November to prepare for an expansion that combined its previous space with the next-door space, the former Milwaukee Moulding & Frame building. 

After almost a year it is reopening an 8,000-square-foot space that includes ample seating, an arcade and dance floor. There are 45 TVs throughout the building for game watching and 40 draft lines for beers. A 2,000-square-foot beer garden is outside. 

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“It’s unrecognizable from before,” said Marc Fortney, co-owner of Brothers, 1213 N. Water St. “We’re really bringing everything. It’s the new version of Brothers.”

The bar and restaurant chain is based in La Crosse and has 20 locations across the country. Fortney said Brothers started as a college bar, but its new locations have been larger and more family-friendly. 



a store inside of a building: The second floor of Brothers Bar and Grill overlooks the first floor. It is reopening on Oct. 8, 2020 at 1213 N. Water St.


© Jordyn Noennig
The second floor of Brothers Bar and Grill overlooks the first floor. It is reopening on Oct. 8, 2020 at 1213 N. Water St.

“As we’ve gotten older, we’ve thought more about what we would want in a bar, and brought that to Brothers,” he said. “We’re available for family dining, and after 10 p.m. we’ll be 21 and older and focus on that crowd.” 

The Milwaukee Brothers is the first remodeled location in Wisconsin. 

“We don’t have this in La Crosse,” Fortney said. “We thought it was a great opportunity to do this in Milwaukee with the Fiserv Forum right there. It’s really exciting for us

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Residents come up with elaborate ideas that dot landscapes around Martinsville and Henry County | Home & Garden

While there are certainly some yard projects people can complete on their own, adding a popular water feature requires more know-how than grabbing a shovel and a garden hose. Other projects also deserve the knowledge of a trained professional.

Planting a bed of flowers might not seem like rocket science, but Cox noted that even that can take an unexpected turn over several years’ time if the plants are not properly spaced to begin with.

Then there are the technical aspects of landscaping, like properly installing irrigation systems.

However, not every yard project takes years of experience to do well. For those who aren’t quite ready to put a down payment on their backyard retreat, but want to spruce up their yard, Cox expressed that simple maintenance can go a long way when boosting curb appeal.

“I think mulching. I think neatness. Keeping the yard picked up, leaves out of it, grass mowed. I think something like that,” Cox said. “I think good maintenance is pretty much essential to keeping a property at its best.”

Looking to enhance their outdoor space, Martinsville husband and wife Jamie and Cristen Anderson and their two sons decided to put the money they’d saved for a June vacation toward updating their deck, especially with Virginia on a stay-at-home order.

“We decided to update the deck by staining, purchasing new furniture, a grill and updated décor. In addition to the deck, we have updated the kids play toys, sand play area and stocked up on outdoor activities such as chalk, bubbles, etcetera,” Cristen Anderson said. “This will give us something to do when at home during the spring and early summer.”

Source Article

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Kevin O’Connor will appear at the Dispatch Home and Garden Show

Steve Stephens
 
| The Columbus Dispatch

The long-time host of “This Old House,” the ground-breaking home-improvement television show, will appear — virtually — at the Fall Dispatch Home & Garden Show on Saturday.

Kevin O’Connor, who has been host of the PBS show since 2003, last appeared at the Columbus show two years ago. On that occasion he was here in person, of course.

“I do a lot of home shows, but this is my first virtual one,” said O’Connor, 52. 

“But I think people understand why that’s necessary this year, and know exactly what to expect.”

Because of the pandemic, this year’s home and garden show will be online and on demand. The show will be live online Thursday through Saturday and the online exhibit hall will remain open through the end of the month.

Register for the show at DispatchHomeandGardenShow.com. Guests who pre-register by Wednesday will receive one free ticket to attend the Spring Dispatch Home & Garden Show presented by Ohio Mulch.

At this year’s online event, guests can still explore home-improvement ideas, talk in real time with knowledgeable local craftspeople and contractors and check off some of the items on their home-improvement project list. 

And, as in previous years, celebrity guests, including O’Connor, will be making appearances.

O’Connor is scheduled to speak to the online audience at 11 a.m. on Saturday and answer questions beginning at 11:30 a.m.

“This Old House” celebrated its 40th anniversary last year.

“It’s the longest running (home-improvement) show, and, without trying to thump our chest, it’s not just something that’s barely hanging on,” O’Connor said.

“It’s still the most highly watched.”

O’Connor was a corporate banker when he and his wife wrote a letter to This Old House magazine asking for help with wallpaper. The couple appeared in a segment of 

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