Ghost

Baileys’ Restaurants to debut new ghost kitchen concept this Thursday

‘Tis the season for ghosts…and ghost kitchens.

In simple terms, a ghost kitchen is a restaurant without seats, a narrow-focus pivot created to cater to the burgeoning food pickup and delivery business. Ghost kitchens tend to focus on a single, popular item. Recently, KC-style ribs, sandwiches, and other chicken wing riffs have launched out of kitchens in St. Louis, and a smashburger ghost kitchen is on the horizon.

Last month, Dave and Kara Bailey, owners of Baileys’ Restaurants, introduced Wing Ding Dong, a chicken-wing based ghost kitchen concept operating out of Baileys’ Range.

This Thursday, they plan to roll out a new concept: Playing Ketchup, which will feature all-beef “ripper” hot dogs and brats—specifically the Grant’s Farm brat from G&W Meat, prepared in Zwickel, onion, and seasoning. 

The name was a snap for the Baileys. “Double entendres are the name of the game in ghost kitchens, apparently,” says Dave, adding that more concepts are in the works as well. “We have no shortage of ideas. Our plan is to keep layering.”

Rippers are deep-fried dogs cooked to the point that they just start to rip open to produce that sought-after snap. Both buns and toppings, including a dozen ketchups and sauces, will be made in the company commissary. The buns are butter-rolled and grilled. 

Dogs range from unadorned to piled high. The toppings list is formidable, with such options as white cheddar, blue cheese, kraut, chow chow, salsa, pulled pork, bacon, pickles, sport peppers, caramelized onions, grilled sweet jalapeños, onion raws, tomato, onion, lettuce, ranch, buffalo sauce, chili, mac n cheese, Rooster mayo, cream cheese, and salsa verde.

If that list is overwhelming, then opt for a classic Chicago dog, with telltale neon green relish and sport peppers. Other specialties include the Buffalo Dog (topped with buffalo sauce, blue cheese,

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Ghost of Tsushima Announced for PS5, Next-Gen Improvements Revealed

Sucker Punch Production’s hit game Ghost of Tsushima is coming to the PlayStation 5, the developer said this week. It’s not getting a PlayStation 5 rerelease that we know of yet, but it’s been confirmed that the game will be playable on the next-gen console via backwards compatibility and will benefit from some of the core upgrades offered to games on the new console. It’ll be playable on the console the same day that the PlayStation 5 is released, Sucker Punch said.

The update on Ghost of Tsushima was shared by the developer shortly after PlayStation shared a bunch of details about the PlayStation 5’s backwards compatibility feature. For those who’ve been progressing through the game on the PlayStation 4 and don’t want to have to start over, you can bring your save file with you so you can pick up where you left off.

On the PlayStation 5, the game will also be compatible with the new console’s Game Boost feature that enhances games by improving frame rates and resolutions. In Ghost of Tsushima’s case, this means it’ll hit frame rates up to 60FPS and will have even quicker load times than it already does on the PlayStation 4.

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‘Ghost kitchens’ and ‘virtual food halls’ might be the next frontier in Twin Cities dining

Sandwiches had been on Carrie McCabe-Johnston’s mind for two years.

Ever since a family vacation to Florence, Italy, where labyrinth stone streets teem with purveyors of freshly baked bread stuffed with salami or roasted porchetta, she’d been thinking about opening a Florence-style sandwich shop back home.

The founder and chef of Bonafide Hospitality, which includes Nightingale in Minneapolis, McCabe-Johnston was searching for a place for the shop last fall, but put the idea on hold when she didn’t find the right fit.

Then came COVID-19, and as her other dining rooms and bars temporarily closed to customers, sandwiches came to mind once again. Only this time, finding a space wasn’t necessary.

McCabe-Johnston launched Lake City Sandwiches last month as an evening-only, delivery-only business operating out of Nightingale’s kitchen. “It’s our little ghost kitchen,” she said. “Complete with its own branding.”

By starting a new restaurant within a restaurant, albeit one without seats and servers, McCabe-Johnston has latched on to a rising trend of using pre-existing businesses to house new takeout ventures.

With virtual happy hours and virtual meetings now the norm, it was only a matter of time before virtual restaurants took off, too. Call them ghost kitchens, cloud kitchens or dark kitchens — basically any kitchen that’s already in motion can be leveraged to power more than one food business. Especially an underused kitchen, as the coronavirus keeps would-be customers home.

In the Twin Cities, some restaurateurs are going virtual as a way of branching into different cuisines, testing future brick-and-mortar ideas, or just keeping the lights on during a tumultuous year.

“The whole point of us doing it right now is for an additional stream of revenue,” McCabe-Johnston said. “Lake City Sandwiches is going to help what could be a tough winter for Nightingale.”

New brands a lifeline

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