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Holm Auto Good News: Salina Tech students eager to learn, while remodeling Ashby House shelter – News – Salina Journal

Pumped with zeal and strapped into a loaded carpenter’s belt, Jordan Castaneda greeted Salina Technical College classmates for some on-the-job learning.

“I’m ready to get this party going,” said the 18-year-old Salinan on Wednesday, aching for some construction work after spending weeks mostly in a classroom.

The budding builders were “chomping at the bit. They’ve been in the classroom since the start of the semester (Aug. 20),” said Kevin Watters, Salina Tech construction technology instructor.

His crew that ranges in size from eight to 11, was eager to join in the remodel of an Ashby House shelter at 158 S. Eighth.

“I love getting hands on, in the action. The days go faster. It feels like forever in the classroom,” said Castaneda, a 2020 Salina Central High School graduate, who credits his uncle, Mario Martinez, owner of a Salina construction business, for introducing him to the trade, and gifting him the passion to build.

Several departments at the technical college have joined in repurposing the 100-plus-year-old, two-story home that was moved to the Ashby House complex during the summer of 2019.

Salina-based Blue Beacon International’s hotels division, Lighthouse Properties, donated the house, moving expenses and some of the concrete costs, to Ashby House.

The old home had to go to create more room for the new downtown Salina hotel, Homewood Suites by Hilton.

Attached to a basement foundation, the house is undergoing a $400,000 transformation into a 30-bed primary shelter, said Andy Houltberg, Ashby House executive director.

The nonprofit organization that runs a shelter for women and families, and a number of other programs — Sober Living Program, Free Store open to the community, Transitional Housing, Toy Store and Career Closet — has raised about half of the money and services necessary to complete the work, Houltberg said, through grants

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Little White House office highlights four homes

Ebby Halliday Realtors’ Little White House office is showcasing four homes, two of which will be held open this afternoon.

Served by the Highland Park Independent School District, the custom residence at 7908 Hanover St. (7908hanover.ebby.com) in University Park is offered for $1,699,000. It will be held open from 1 to 3 p.m.

This four-bedroom, 4½-bathroom home offers an open floor plan. A large family room with a woodburning fireplace opens to a kitchen with an island, custom cabinetry, a breakfast bar and a walk-in pantry. The primary suite has French doors that lead to the balcony. The backyard offers a covered patio, fireplace, built-in grill and pool. For additional details, contact Chris Hickman at 469-569-1106 or [email protected]

Located in Dallas’ Belmont neighborhood, the five-bedroom, 5½-bathroom home at 6032 Richmond Ave. (6032richmond.ebby.com) is offered for $1 million. It will be held open from 1 to 3 p.m.

The traditional-style residence features a spacious open floor plan with wood flooring and high ceilings. The kitchen provides marble countertops and a walk-in pantry and opens to a living room with a fireplace. The backyard has a pool, spa, cabana and built-in grill. For more information, contact Paul Farrow at 214-641-9814 or [email protected] com.

The estate at 4720 Royal Lane (4720royal.ebby.com) in Preston Hollow is offered for $3.5 million. This gated home features a stone exterior with cast-iron accents. There are seven bedrooms, eight bathrooms, four half-bathrooms and four woodburning fireplaces. The kitchen is equipped with high-end appliances and a spacious pantry. The primary suite has dual bathrooms and a well-equipped exercise room.

The resort-style backyard features a pool and spa, sport court, outdoor kitchen and brick gazebo. Additional amenities include a wine vault, elevator and separate guest quarters. For more details, contact Dorothy Bell at 214-906-4788 or [email protected] or Joe Gall at

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Aviation contractors axed jobs as U.S. delayed aid, House panel finds

CHICAGO (Reuters) – U.S. aviation contractors laid off thousands of workers due to delays in payroll aid from the U.S. Treasury that was meant to protect jobs, an investigation by a U.S. House of Representatives subcommittee found.

Under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (CARES Act), companies in the aviation sector were granted funds to cover six months of their payroll as the COVID-19 pandemic prompted a precipitous decline in air travel.

The legislation banned any job cuts through September, and requires the U.S. Department of the Treasury to begin distributing funds to eligible companies within 10 days of the law’s approval on March 27.

But an investigation by the House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis found that top contractors did not receive the money until months later, resulting in more than 16,500 layoffs and furloughs at 15 companies, more than 15% of the aviation contractor workforce.

“Had Treasury met the deadline set by Congress, many of these jobs would have been preserved,” the report said.

Treasury did not immediately comment.

Among the top seven contractors, Swissport waited 99 days before its payroll support agreement with Treasury was finalized, Gate Gourmet 78 days and Flying Food Fare 74 days, leading to nearly 12,000 layoffs and furloughs at those three companies alone.

The companies still received the full amount of federal aid based on their pre-pandemic workforce, even though they had laid off many of those workers, the report said.

Swissport, Gate Gourmet and Flying Food Fare did not immediately comment.

Aviation contractors were awarded $3 billion under the first CARES Act and could see those funds extended for another six months if Congress passes a second stimulus package.

The report recommends another round of aid but said layoffs should be prohibited until a company uses all of

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Abandoned house and companion cottage win Petaluma’s top renovation award

When Karen Brown went searching for a property in Petaluma where she and a longtime friend might co-invest and coexist, there was nothing on the market that fit the bill. It was 2013, the nation was coming out of a deep recession and the pickings were slim, especially for affordable properties with two units or enough area to build an accessory dwelling. So Brown walked the streets of the old west side and ended up beating the bushes — literally — to find her dream home hidden among an overgrowth of acacias.

The house was so concealed she almost missed it. A “no trespassing“ sign did not encourage exploration. But she was intrigued. There, set back on a third of an acre, was an abandoned shack with plywood nailed over the doors. It had no foundation and perched on piers in the ground. It hadn’t been occupied in at least 10 years, apart from the possum living in the front room.

Despite all that, Brown saw immediate possibilities. The property was large enough for a second small home, and there was something about the forlorn little cabin that tugged at her heart.

She came to call it “the little house that cried.”

“It was either going to get torn down or somebody was going to come along at the last minute and love it. And that’s what happened.”

Potential in the ruins

As the creative director of an educational nonprofit, Brown, with her artistic imagination, could see possibility amid the ruins. Her friend Alan Good shared her vision.

“There’s an old saying about ‘location, location, location.’ That was really clear,” said Good, a longtime horticulturist who for years managed the living roof of the California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park. “West Petaluma is a wonderful place to live,

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How Ben Hillman from a Place in the Sun renovated his house on a budget

Presenter Ben built a play area for his daughters (Picture: Simon Eldon)

As a presenter of the long-running Channel 4 show A Place In The Sun, Ben Hillman is used to helping homeowners visualise a property’s potential.

But with lockdown grounding flights, Ben finally got the opportunity and time to finish off his own dream home renovation project in Shoreham-by-Sea – and save a lot of money in the process.

Since buying it in 2016, Ben and wife Gaby have been slowly renovating their 1934 semi-detached, four-bed. Ben had spotted the house online while in Costa Rica and checked out its potential for extension and renovation by looking at Google Earth.

The couple were quick to add a wraparound extension downstairs. With that complete and the new, enlarged kitchen created and finished by Ben, there were a multitude of smaller jobs to complete, including a mammoth upstairs bathroom project budgeted to cost £15,000.

Retro: Furniture reflects a classic, mid-century vibe (Picture: Simon Eldon)

When the pandemic struck, Ben realised he needed a whole new approach.

‘We had been saving money for the bathroom but spent that money on shopping,’ he says. ‘I had spent so much money on the house [in the past] but lockdown made me reassess what money I’m chucking at it. We went from spending £15,000 on a bathroom to £500. But even though it’s super-budget, it’s great, and just as pleasing. Lockdown has taught me to be more inventive.’

Out went plans to knock the bathroom, shower room and hall into one larger space with a freestanding bath. In came a self-fitted plywood birch floor and a birch plywood shelf with birch wood bath panel.

Ben also managed to update the UPVC window using a new paint from Zinsser, which allows people to turn the frames

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