NapaSonoma

Glass fire 50% contained after destroying 600 homes in California’s Napa-Sonoma area

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — The devastating Glass fire burning in Napa and Sonoma counties is now halfway contained, with evacuation orders remaining in place for thousands while damage inspection teams continue to assess the wildfire’s extensive destruction, authorities say.



a group of fruit hanging from a tree: The vineyards at the Somerston Estate Winery & Vineyards, photographed on Wednesday, September 30, 2020 in St. Helena, California. Wineries like Somerston are forgoing a 2020 vintage due to the ongoing wildfire season, which has seen two major wildfires in the region so far.


© Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times/TNS
The vineyards at the Somerston Estate Winery & Vineyards, photographed on Wednesday, September 30, 2020 in St. Helena, California. Wineries like Somerston are forgoing a 2020 vintage due to the ongoing wildfire season, which has seen two major wildfires in the region so far.

Since igniting outside of Calistoga on Sept. 27 and growing intensely toward Santa Rosa in its first 48 hours due to heavy wind gusts, the fire has now consumed at least 600 homes, Cal Fire’s Sonoma-Lake-Napa unit said in a Tuesday morning incident update. The state fire agency reports the blaze is now 66,840 acres and 50% contained.

Emergency officials in the past few days have reduced some mandatory evacuation orders to voluntary warnings, including all of the cities of Calistoga and St. Helena, the Sonoma County community of Kenwood and some neighborhoods on the east side of Santa Rosa inside city limits.

But numerous other orders have remained in place for more than a week, and some newer orders, particularly in parts of northern Napa County near the Lake County line, have been issued as recently as Sunday afternoon. Cal Fire says more than 21,000 structures are still considered threatened.

Up-to-date evacuation information, including details about the repopulation process for evacuated residents, is posted regularly to the Nixle webpages for the Santa Rosa Police Department, the city of Calistoga, the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office and the Napa County Office of Emergency Services. Updates are also available via the social media pages for those entities and Cal Fire LNU.



a sign in front of a cloudy sky: The Glass fire in Napa County along CA-128 on Wednesday, September 30, 2020 in Calistoga, California.


© Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles

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New wildfires in the Napa-Sonoma wine country force nearly 70,000 to flee homes

SAN FRANCISCO — Northern California’s wine country was on fire again Monday as strong winds fanned flames in the already scorched region, destroying homes and prompting overnight evacuation orders involving nearly 70,000 people. Meanwhile, three people died in a separate fire further north in the state.

Residents of the Oakmont Gardens senior living facility in Santa Rosa boarded brightly lit city buses, some wearing bathrobes and using walkers. They wore masks to protect against the coronavirus as orange flames marked the dark sky.

The fire threat forced Adventist Health St. Helena hospital to suspend care and transfer all patients elsewhere.

The fires that began Sunday in the famed Napa-Sonoma wine country about 45 miles north of San Francisco came as the region nears the third anniversary of deadly wildfires that erupted in 2017, including one that killed 22 people. Just a month ago, many of those same residents were evacuated from the path of a lightning-sparked fire that became the fourth-largest in state history.

“Our firefighters have not had much of a break, and these residents have not had much of a break,” said Daniel Berlant, assistant deputy director with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, known as Cal Fire.

Sonoma County Supervisor Susan Gorin evacuated her home in the Oakmont community of Santa Rosa about 1 a.m. She is rebuilding a home damaged in the 2017 fires. Gorin told the San Francisco Chronicle that she is numb, and the situation feels surreal.

“It’s like God has no sympathy, no empathy for Sonoma County,” she said.

More than 68,000 people in Sonoma and Napa counties have been evacuated in the latest inferno, one of 27 major fire clusters burning across the state, said Berlant. Many more residents have been warned that they might have to flee, even though

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