Ongoing

Davis Love III drops by to see ongoing Belmont Golf Course renovation project | Golf

The renovation will also include a putting course just under an acre in size, a driving range and a putting green.

After Belmont was opened in 1916, it was renovated by Donald Ross in 1927.

But the current renovation is restoring portions of the course back to the way it first was. Nine of the 12 holes on the main course will have original greens.

Other holes, on the six-hole short course, draw influences from other Tillinghast courses, like San Francisco Golf Club.

“It’s just, trying to bring the history back,” Love said.

Belmont isn’t short on history, as the only course in Virginia to host a PGA major: the 1949 PGA Championship, won by Sam Snead. Ben Hogan also won the Richmond Invitational there, four years earlier.

But space was one of the reasons First Tee and Love Golf Design opted to split the course into a 12-hole circuit and a six-hole short course, instead of leaving it at 18 holes. The facility lacked amenities like an area to practice, which First Tee needs for its youth programs.

So the spot was divided a bit.

“This was an 18-hole golf course with no practice facility,” said Brent Schneider, CEO of The First Tee of Greater Richmond. “And so we knew in its original state it wasn’t going to work. But we also really appreciated the history.”

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Ongoing Vigilance and Improvements Characterize the State of Cybersecurity in 2020, New CompTIA Report Finds

DOWNERS GROVE, Ill., Oct. 1, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Organizations are building confidence that their cybersecurity practices are headed in the right direction, aided by advanced technologies, more detailed processes, comprehensive education and specialized skills, new research from CompTIA finds.

CompTIA is the voice of the world's information technology industry. (PRNewsFoto/CompTIA)

Eight in 10 organizations surveyed for CompTIA’s State of Cybersecurity 2020 report said their cybersecurity practices are improving.

At the same time, many companies acknowledge that there is still more to do to make their security posture even more robust. Growing concerns about the number, scale and variety of cyberattacks, privacy considerations, a greater reliance on data and regulatory compliance are among the issues that have the attention of business and IT leaders.

Two factors – one anticipated, the other unexpected – have contributed to the heightened awareness about the need for strong cybersecurity measures.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has been the primary trigger for revisiting security,” said Seth Robinson, senior director for technology analysis at CompTIA. “The massive shift to remote work exposed vulnerabilities in workforce knowledge and connectivity, while phishing emails preyed on new health concerns.”

Robinson noted that the pandemic accelerated changes that were underway in many organizations that were undergoing the digital transformation of their business operations.

“This transformation elevated cybersecurity from an element within IT operations to an overarching business concern that demands executive-level attention,” he said. “It has become  a critical business function, on par with a company’s financial procedures.”

As a result, companies have a better understanding of what do about cybersecurity. Nine in 10 organizations said their cybersecurity processes have become more formal and more critical. Two examples are risk management, where companies assess their data and their systems to determine the level of security that each requires; and monitoring and measurement, where security efforts are continually tracked and new metrics are

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