Oracle

U.S. Supreme Court divided over Google bid to end Oracle copyright suit

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court appeared divided on Wednesday as it considered whether to protect Alphabet Inc’s Google from a long-running lawsuit by Oracle Corp accusing it of infringing Oracle copyrights to build the Android operating system that runs most of the world’s smartphones.

FILE PHOTO: The U.S. Supreme Court is seen through the U.S. Capitol columns in Washington, U.S. September 29, 2020. REUTERS/Erin Scott/File Photo

The shorthanded court, down one justice following last month’s death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, heard oral arguments in Google’s appeal of a lower court ruling reviving the lawsuit in which Oracle has sought at least $8 billion in damages.

Some of the eight justices expressed concern that Google simply copied Oracle’s software code instead of innovating and creating its own for mobile devices. Others emphasized that siding with Oracle could give software developers too much power with potentially harmful effects on the technology industry.

A jury cleared Google in 2016, but the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit overturned that decision in 2018, finding that Google’s inclusion of Oracle’s software code in Android was not permissible under U.S. copyright law.

Oracle accused Google of copying thousands of lines of computer code from its popular Java programming language without a license in order to make Android, a competing platform that has harmed Oracle’s business.

Google lawyer Thomas Goldstein told the justices that the disputed Java code should not receive copyright protection because it was the “the only way” to create new programs using the programming language.

“The language only permits us to use those,” Goldstein said.

Chief Justice John Roberts suggested Google still should have paid Oracle for a license to Java.

“Cracking the safe may be the only way to get the money that you

Continue Reading

U.S. Supreme Court divided over Google bid to end Oracle …

(Adds end of arguments, fresh quotes from justices)

By Jan Wolfe and Andrew Chung

WASHINGTON, Oct 7 (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court appeared divided on Wednesday as it considered whether to protect Alphabet Inc’s Google from a long-running lawsuit by Oracle Corp accusing it of infringing Oracle copyrights to build the Android operating system that runs most of the world’s smartphones.

The shorthanded court, down one justice following the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg last month, heard oral arguments in Google’s appeal of a lower court ruling reviving the lawsuit in which Oracle has sought at least $8 billion in damages.

Some of the eight justices expressed concern that Google simply copied Oracle’s software code instead of innovating and creating its own for mobile devices. Others emphasized that siding with Oracle could give software developers too much power with potentially harmful effects on the technology industry.

A jury cleared Google in 2016, but the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit overturned that decision in 2018, finding that Google’s inclusion of Oracle’s software code in Android was not permissible under U.S. copyright law.

Oracle accused Google of copying thousands of lines of computer code from its popular Java programming language without a license in order to make Android, a competing platform that has harmed Oracle’s business.

Google lawyer Thomas Goldstein told the court that the disputed Java code should not receive copyright protection because it was the “the only way” to create new programs using the programming language.

“The language only permits us to use those,” Goldstein said.

But Chief Justice John Roberts suggested Google still should have paid Oracle for a license to Java.

“Cracking the safe may be the only way to get the money that you want, but that doesn’t mean you can do it,”

Continue Reading

Supreme Court divided over Google bid to end Oracle copyright suit

Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court appeared divided on Wednesday as it considered whether to protect Alphabet Inc’s <GOOGL.O> Google from a long-running lawsuit by Oracle Corp <ORCL.N> accusing it of infringing Oracle copyrights to build the Android operating system that runs most of the world’s smartphones.

The shorthanded court, down one justice following the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg last month, heard oral arguments in Google’s appeal of a lower court ruling reviving the lawsuit in which Oracle has sought at least $8 billion in damages.

Some of the eight justices expressed concern that Google simply copied Oracle’s software code instead of innovating and creating its own for mobile devices. Others emphasized that siding with Oracle could give software developers too much power with potentially harmful effects on the technology industry.

A jury cleared Google in 2016, but the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit overturned that decision in 2018, finding that Google’s inclusion of Oracle’s software code in Android was not permissible under U.S. copyright law.

Oracle accused Google of copying thousands of lines of computer code from its popular Java programming language without a license in order to make Android, a competing platform that has harmed Oracle’s business.

Google lawyer Thomas Goldstein told the court that the disputed Java code should not receive copyright protection because it was the “the only way” to create new programs using the programming language.

“The language only permits us to use those,” Goldstein said.

But Chief Justice John Roberts suggested Google still should have paid Oracle for a license to Java.

“Cracking the safe may be the only way to get the money that you want, but that doesn’t mean

Continue Reading

Oracle rolls out improvements across SaaS applications

Oracle on Tuesday announced the latest updates to a series of cloud applications, including Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP), Enterprise Performance Management (EPM), Supply Chain Managment (SCM), Human Capital Management (HCM) and its Customer Data Platform (CDP). The updates come as enterprises rethink their longer-term business strategies, months into the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Part of Oracle’s message is “the importance of cloud as an enabler to come out of this and recapture the next decade of growth,” said Juergen Lindner, Oracle’s SVP of product marketing for cloud ERP and supply chain applications. “Now is not the time to slow down, quite the contrary — it’s time to double down and hopefully come out at the better end of this as a stronger company.”

Particularly within the category of ERP, which grew 33 percent year-over-year in Oracle’s last reported quarter, “customers feel the same way,” Lindner said. “They want to invest right now.” 

While revenue growth was strong, so was the number of go-lives, he added. “We did not necessarily expect customers would be as decisive in their investment strategy but in their implementation strategy as well.” 

In the ERP space, the updates focus on adding more automation, predictive planning and more capabilities from digital assistants. The specific improvements include: 

  • Intelligent Process Automation to simplify financial close and account reconciliation. Oracle’s Fusion Cloud ERP uses configurable and intelligent rules to recognize and handle patterns. 
  • Intelligent Account Combination Defaulting automatically predicts and inputs code segments for invoices not associated with purchase orders, reducing the need for routine data entry. 
  • Automated Tagging of Regulatory Reports, such as 10Ks and 10Qs, using the customer’s SEC XBRL taxonomy. This feature uses advanced language processing and pattern recognition. 
  • Intelligent Performance Management to help customers analyze the impact of financial and operational decisions. This feature finds hard-to-spot data patterns
Continue Reading