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Delhi stops displaying notices at homes of COVID-19 patients because of stigma

By Sanjeev Miglani

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – Delhi authorities have stopped putting notices outside the homes of people infected with coronavirus because this has amplified the social stigma associated with the disease and in turn caused others to hide their illness, officials said on Monday.

Early on during the outbreak in the Indian capital, officials would paste a poster on the homes of people in quarantine after they had tested positive for the virus to make sure everyone in the neighbourhood was careful. It also deterred people from violating the quarantine.

But more than six months into the pandemic people were fully aware of COVID-19, the respiratory disease caused by the virus, and there was less need to publicise the cases, city officials said. Instead it was important to instil confidence in people to come forward and test themselves.

“There is a stigma with the coronavirus disease and posters outside the house amplify that. By doing away with this, we are aiming at increased testing. We want more people to get themselves tested without thinking of stigmas,” said Delhi environment minister Kailash Gehlot.

India’s total coronavirus cases stood at 7.12 million on Monday, health ministry data showed, behind only the United States which is approaching the 8 million mark.

The country recorded 66,732 new infections in the last 24 hours, a decline from last month’s highs, but still the world’s highest daily rise.

Deaths from COVID-19 infections rose by 816 to 109,150, the health ministry said.

Delhi makes up a little over 4% of India’s total caseload, the second highest after the western city of Pune, and ahead of Mumbai and Bengaluru.

Some residents in Delhi said that such was the fear over the disease that people tried to distance themselves from patients even after they had recovered.

“Discrimination is

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Telehealth Helps Patients Avoid Rehab in Nursing Homes


Telehealth policies have loosened since the pandemic began, helping feed the surge in at-home recoveries. Medicare has relaxed guidelines for the kinds of patients eligible for services that make rehab at home possible, and many insurance plans now cover those services.

“A lot of people don’t realize, when you check into a hospital, you really need to check out what the discharge plan will be,” says Elaine Ryan, vice president for state advocacy and strategy at AARP. “When you’re discharged, the question is: Can you receive in-home rehabilitation? And the answer is yes. You don’t have to go into those centers.”

Avoiding the nursing home

Nursing homes “were fighting a PR battle” even before the coronavirus swept the U.S. and sickened more than 238,000 residents, says Fred Bentley, managing director of Avalere Health. The pandemic has made that PR problem “way, way worse.”

“We are going to find patients who before COVID would have gone into a facility, no questions asked, and now they have options,” Bentley says.

That’s a problem for nursing homes, which for decades have depended on Medicare payments from short-term rehab patients. Many homes rely on Medicaid payments from long-term care residents but on Medicare reimbursements from short-term patients who’ve been discharged from the hospital after a fall, illness or elective procedure.

“Because Medicaid rates are quite low, [nursing homes] depend heavily on patients insured by Medicare, and Medicare pays for post-hospital care in nursing homes,” says the University of Pennsylvania’s Werner. Nursing homes averaged $544 per patient day in Medicare revenue from rehab patients last year, according to data from the National Investment Center for Seniors Housing & Care. That’s more than twice Medicaid’s rate of $216 per patient day from long-term care recipients.

But nursing homes’ Medicare revenue cratered when hospitals across the country

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Actually, We Didn’t Send Any COVID Patients Into Nursing Homes

Just when you think this man cannot get more brazenly dishonest, he manages to prove you wrong. New York’s Democratic governor — who has presided over the highest number of COVID deaths in the nation, and one of the worst death rates — is not only writing a book about his “success” and congratulating himself for saving lives. He’s not only falsely claiming that President Trump is responsible for the virus arriving in New York. And he’s no longer merely manipulating data to downplay his disastrously lethal policy on nursing homes. He’s now taken his gaslighting to shockingly mendacious lows, telling New Yorkers that the nursing homes scandal…never existed. Simply stunning:

“It just never happened that we needed a nursing home to take a COVID-positive person,” he says. No matter how you slice it, this is a lie. The lie he appears to be telling here is one of obfuscation, to dismiss a very serious matter by rebutting an accusation nobody is actually leveling. Is anyone claiming that the terrible policy he inflicted on New York involved forcing nursing homes to take in coronavirus-infected patients because of a lack of hospital beds elsewhere? That’s obviously not the allegation. The allegation, which is absolutely true, is that New York State forced long-term care centers and nursing homes to permit COVID-positive residents to enter those facilities while infected, seriously endangering the vulnerable populations inside. For weeks on end, New York also permitted COVID-positive nursing home employees to show up for work, putting residents at more risk. The goal, pursued by other states, should have been to keep people with coronavirus as far away

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Gov. Cuomo falsely claims New York nursing homes ‘never needed’ to take in Covid-positive patients

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo argued that nursing homes “never needed” to accept Covid-positive patients from hospitals in the state.



Andrew Cuomo wearing a suit and tie: NEW YORK, NY - JULY 23: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during the daily media briefing at the Office of the Governor of the State of New York on July 23, 2020 in New York City. The Governor said the state liquor authority has suspended 27 bar and restaurant alcohol licenses for violations of social distancing rules as public officials try to keep the coronavirus outbreak under control. (Photo by Jeenah Moon/Getty Images)


© Jeenah Moon/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY – JULY 23: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during the daily media briefing at the Office of the Governor of the State of New York on July 23, 2020 in New York City. The Governor said the state liquor authority has suspended 27 bar and restaurant alcohol licenses for violations of social distancing rules as public officials try to keep the coronavirus outbreak under control. (Photo by Jeenah Moon/Getty Images)

During a press call Wednesday, Finger Lakes News Radio asked Cuomo about his administration’s advisory in late March requiring that nursing homes accept the readmission of patients from hospitals, even if they were positive for Covid-19.

Cuomo argued that the advisory was a precaution if hospitals became overwhelmed — calling it an “anticipatory rule” — which he said didn’t happen.

“We never needed nursing home beds because we always had hospital beds,” Cuomo told Finger Lakes News. “So it just never happened in New York where we needed to say to a nursing home, ‘We need you to take this person even though they’re Covid-positive.’ It never happened.”

Facts First: Cuomo’s assertion that “it never happened” is false. According to a report from the New York State Department of Health, “6,326 COVID-positive residents were admitted to [nursing home] facilities” following Cuomo’s mandate that nursing homes accept the readmission of Covid-positive patients from hospitals. Whether or not this was “needed,” it did in fact happen.

On March 25, the state’s Health Department issued an advisory requiring nursing homes to accept “the expedited receipt of residents returning from hospitals” if the patients were deemed medically stable.

“No resident shall be

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Whitmer revises rules on nursing homes with virus patients

Under an order issued late Wednesday, they instead will be transferred to “care and recovery” centers that will replace the hub network.

LANSING, Mich — Gov. Gretchen Whitmer revised rules related to the care of Michigan nursing home residents with the coronavirus, saying they should be sent to facilities with solid federal staffing ratings.

Currently, infected residents from homes without a dedicated COVID-19 unit go to one of 21 state-designated “hub” nursing homes when they leave the hospital or when they need a higher level of care but not hospitalization. Under an order issued late Wednesday, they instead will be transferred to “care and recovery” centers that will replace the hub network.

A hub home can be a care and recovery facility but only if it meets certain standards. The facility has to have a staffing rating of at least three out of five stars, for instance, and cannot have an abuse or neglect citation.

Whitmer did not, as Republican lawmakers have suggested, establish COVID-only facilities or buildings. She also lifted a ban on communal dining, instead requiring that dining and group activities be consistent with federal and state guidance.

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