place

Passaic Dignity Home Offers A Place For Homeless Individuals To Receive Mail

PASSAIC, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — Having a mailbox is something most people don’t think twice about, but many homeless individuals don’t have a place to get important documents or letters.

The city of Passaic is changing that.

CBS2’s Jenna DeAngelis spoke to a man who didn’t want to share his name but shared the hardships faced since losing his job as a handyman nine months ago.

“When you lose your job, you don’t got no money to pay the rent,” he said.

It’s a problem experienced by many in the pandemic. The man says no home and no mailing address means “for a job, especially if you apply for something, you never know they respond, you never know if they accept you.”

RELATED STORY: Volunteer Groups Gearing Up To Provide Coats, Blankets For Homeless Individuals As Temperatures Drop

“It came up in a conversation with me that some don’t have access to mail, things that we take for granted every single day. They don’t know how to connect to get their benefits, whether social security, or even if they applied for a job, what address are they gonna put down for correspondence?” Passaic Mayor Hector Lora said.

Now, they can put down 276 Broadway — the address for Passaic Dignity House, which now has mailboxes designated to homeless individuals.

“This is not just for someone to come in and say ‘Give me a mailbox’ and we won’t see you for six or seven months. These are people we want to follow because the ultimate goal is to get them off the street,” Lora said.

That can start with a simple letter, which the post office delivers through a slot. Human Services takes care of the rest.

The mail either gets placed in one of 21 mailboxes or it’s held for

Continue Reading

How Ben Hillman from a Place in the Sun renovated his house on a budget

Presenter Ben built a play area for his daughters (Picture: Simon Eldon)

As a presenter of the long-running Channel 4 show A Place In The Sun, Ben Hillman is used to helping homeowners visualise a property’s potential.

But with lockdown grounding flights, Ben finally got the opportunity and time to finish off his own dream home renovation project in Shoreham-by-Sea – and save a lot of money in the process.

Since buying it in 2016, Ben and wife Gaby have been slowly renovating their 1934 semi-detached, four-bed. Ben had spotted the house online while in Costa Rica and checked out its potential for extension and renovation by looking at Google Earth.

The couple were quick to add a wraparound extension downstairs. With that complete and the new, enlarged kitchen created and finished by Ben, there were a multitude of smaller jobs to complete, including a mammoth upstairs bathroom project budgeted to cost £15,000.

Retro: Furniture reflects a classic, mid-century vibe (Picture: Simon Eldon)

When the pandemic struck, Ben realised he needed a whole new approach.

‘We had been saving money for the bathroom but spent that money on shopping,’ he says. ‘I had spent so much money on the house [in the past] but lockdown made me reassess what money I’m chucking at it. We went from spending £15,000 on a bathroom to £500. But even though it’s super-budget, it’s great, and just as pleasing. Lockdown has taught me to be more inventive.’

Out went plans to knock the bathroom, shower room and hall into one larger space with a freestanding bath. In came a self-fitted plywood birch floor and a birch plywood shelf with birch wood bath panel.

Ben also managed to update the UPVC window using a new paint from Zinsser, which allows people to turn the frames

Continue Reading

City contractors to place 250-foot bridge downtown Monday | Colorado Springs News

City contractors will haul a 250-foot-long pedestrian bridge into place Monday over the railroad tracks between the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Museum and America the Beautiful Park.

The new $20 million bridge drew from the architectural themes of the recently opened museum and is expected to become a new iconic downtown structure, said Ryan Phipps, senior engineer with the city of Colorado Springs.

“It’s going to be source of civic pride,” he said.

The bridge is expected to be placed within an eight-hour window and rolled slowly onto its abutments by large self-propelled modular transporters, vehicles that provide a stable platform on numerous wheels, he said. The vehicles are expected to be the safest way to move the 300-ton steel and concrete structure, he said. 

“It will be very exciting to watch,” he said.

The bridge had to be built before it was placed over the railroad tracks because construction could not disrupt freight traffic for an extended period, he said. 

The structure is the latest step in the revitalization of southwest downtown, a vision that’s been decades in the making and is now coming to fruition with the improvements along Vermijo Avenue, the museum’s opening and the construction of the new downtown stadium southwest of Cimarron and Sahwatch streets.

The bridge was designed to match the Olympic museum and the architects drew inspiration from Olympic athletes themselves, designing it to be sleek, minimal and to invoke the idea of motion, said Holly Deichmann Chacon the bridge’s architect with Diller Scofidio + Renfro. 

The bridge’s beauty will also contribute to plans for a modern and urban downtown expected to see about $2 billion in infrastructure and commercial investment over the next 20 years, said Bob Cope, economic development manager. 

“We knew it couldn’t be a typical bridge. … We knew

Continue Reading