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Why the ‘Home Improvement Effect’ May Be Responsible for an Increased Interest in Plastic Surgery

Encino, CA plastic surgeon George Sanders, MD had never done a virtual consultation until March of this year.

But, once COVID hit, it quickly became commonplace at his practice. 

“At first, there were maybe one or two per week, but then there were many—often several each day,” he recalls. “Not only did patients virtually consult, but they scheduled their surgery in anticipation of the end of the surgery shutdown.”

And the calendar concurs: Since his office reopened for elective procedures in mid-May, the surgery schedule has been filled. “Part of this is due to the backlog of patients who were already scheduled for surgery but had to postpone it. Other patients were planning to have surgery anyway, and now seems like the perfect opportunity.”

However, Dr. Sanders says, there’s a third patient group that never considered surgery and are now drawn to it. 

“When I ask these patients seeking plastic surgery why they are doing it, there are a number of reasons that are given. Home improvement has become a big thing during the pandemic. People are spending more time at home and see the need for home improvement. The same reasoning spills over into plastic surgery—patients have more time to spend looking at themselves and are seeing all sorts of needs that can be met by plastic surgery.”

It also comes as no surprise that many patients are not working, or they are able to work from home and recover there while still doing their job. “This gives those who were thinking about surgery before the pandemic, as well as those who began to think of having surgery during the pandemic, a wonderful opportunity because the element of time is often what is missing from the equation when it comes to recovering from surgery,” Dr. Sanders says.   

Remote Recovery

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Nova Scotia company uses millions of plastic bottles to build homes, decks

Nova Scotia company uses millions of plastic bottles to build homes, decks
Nova Scotia company uses millions of plastic bottles to build homes, decks

Nova Scotia is no stranger to gale-force winds, intense storms and even the occasional hurricane. Newly constructed homes in this province must be able to withstand harsh conditions, and the sustainable buildings constructed by JD Composites are proving that they can stand formidable against these harsh local conditions.

The company, which was founded in the Sainte-Marie’s Bay area by Joel German and David Saulnier, builds homes, decks, sheds and other structures using their patented technology made from recycled plastic bottles. Their structural insulated panels (SIPs) consist of Armacell ArmaForm, which is 100 per cent made of recycled plastic bottles that are sourced from an Armacell facility in Brampton, Ontario.

Armacell’s polyethylene terephthalate (PET) technology creates foam products from recycled plastic bottles by crushing them into flakes that then undergo inhouse granulation and extrusion foaming processes. In addition to being used in JC Composites’ SIPs, Armacell ArmaForm is used in 100,000 wind turbine blades, the CRH3A high-speed train in Western China, and in five gilded domes of the Russian Orthodox Cathedral in Paris, France.

Between 15,000 to 45,000 plastic bottles are used to create small sheds and decks, while homes can use 500,000 to 750,000. The variety of uses is impressive, but naturally many wonder how material made of recycled plastic bottles compares to conventional materials.

eco-house credit: JD Composites
eco-house credit: JD Composites

JD Composites used over 600,000 plastic bottles to build this Eco-House in Nova Scotia with their patented panels. Credit: JD Composites

JC Composites states that typical Canadian homes use insulation with an R-20 rating, but this value is often reduced to R-13 because wooden studs create a thermal break in the insulation. The PET plastic in SIPs do not have any thermal breaks, which result in a continuous R-30

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