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Fall Parade of Homes highlights broad range of locations, styles and price points | Business News

Built on a 1.5-acre lot with panoramic views of rural Dane County, the $1.04 million home has five bedrooms, 4.5 baths and 5,200-square-feet of living space. The outside entryway is framed with 12 inch by 12 inch beams of Douglas fir, a bar in the basement is accented with two-inch-thick shelves made from cherry while beams on the living room ceiling are stained to match those on the entryway. The home offers up an elegant but clean and functional design from Bouril Design Studio, an architectural firm in Madison.



Fall Parade of Homes

Offices are popular among those considering a new home. Jason Kratochwill, founder of Jason Thomas Homes, has two offices in his home, which is part of the Madison Area Builders Association’s Fall Parade of Homes.




“What we’re seeing trend-wise in the market is a lot of modern takes on traditional styles,” Kratochwill said. “So, in this case, I have a prairie style home, which is a very traditional style but it’s a very modern take on it.”

The highlights include lights from Madison Lighting, a steel-faced gas fireplace in the living room and a “three-and-a-half season” room with an insulated floor and ceiling and a wood-burning fireplace that can raise the temperature in the room to the mid-60s on frigid January days. The room also includes walls of retractable windows with screens, which further allows the temperature to be controlled in warmer months based on the direction of the wind and rain.



Fall Parade of Homes

The kitchen in the home of builder Jason Kratochwill pairs modern influences and prairie-style design.




In the kitchen, where the island is 4 feet wide by 9 feet long, outlets are hidden underneath cabinets, there’s a spacious pantry and the home is dotted with eight transom windows that further spread the

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DoD space agency driving Pentagon contractors to rethink their price points

Space Development Agency constellations of cheaper mass-produced satellites create opportunities and risks for contractors

WASHINGTON — The Space Development Agency is buying 20 communications satellites for about $14 million apiece, and eight missile-warning satellites for about $43 million per unit.

These price points are unprecedented in Pentagon satellite programs and a sign that the military space market could be headed in a different direction, said Bill Gattle, president of space systems at L3Harris.

L3Harris and SpaceX each received contracts on Monday to build four missile warning satellites for the Space Development Agency. Lockheed Martin and York Space in August won contracts to each produce 10 data-relay satellites. All must be delivered two years from now. 

Military satellites typically are made in onesies and twosies, take decades to develop and cost hundreds of millions of dollars each. The SDA constellations of cheaper mass-produced satellites are a “fundamental transformation” in how DoD buys space technology, Gattle told SpaceNews Oct. 6.

With SDA planning to buy hundreds more satellites in the coming years, “we’re all trying to figure out how to change the price point,” Gattle said.

DoD wants to build large constellations that cost less and also are reliable and deployed quickly, he said. “So all of us have really taken a hard look at how do we build these things? What drives the cost? Why do DoD exquisite systems cost so much?”

Gattle said L3Harris, like other companies, were caught off guard by the speed of SDA contracting. The company had planned to compete for the Transport Layer satellites that were awarded to Lockheed Martin and York Space, but it didn’t move quickly enough. 

“I don’t think we were as ready as we needed to be. And therefore we didn’t win,” he said. When the Tracking Layer opportunity for missile-warning satellites

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Mighty Buildings’ 3D-Printed Homes Points To The Future Of Sustainable Housing

There is a problem with housing in this country. From decades of bad public housing policy to retrofitting the suburbs for sustainability to near consistent affordable housing shortages, we have to start looking at more innovative housing solutions. Not looking to solve all that, but certainly falling somewhere within the mix is Mighty Buildings, an Oakland based company 3D-printing generally affordable homes. All you have to do is find a place to put them.

Which, isn’t too far fetched a concept. People are building apartments in their backyards and from a luxury standpoint, offices or extra rooms in the backyard. Like container homes, 3D printed homes seek to offer a generally affordable alternative to a small, sustainable home created in a non-traditional manner. 3D-printed homes are not a new concept but have mostly been stuck in the conceptual phase until recently.

Mighty Buildings built a 79,000 square foot facility and received approval under the California Factory Built Housing program as well the first UL certification under the new standard for 3D printed construction. It can create 3D-printed homes quicker and more efficiently (it’s literally a giant 3D-printer that prints homes) and sells its output for $115,000 for a studio at the low end to $285,000 for a 3b/2ba. If you live in an inflated housing market (anywhere in California for instance) then you can see the cost benefit immediately.

The innovative part here is not necessarily the methodology of 3D-printing a home instead of cutting up a series of shipping containers to make a container home, but it’s that Mighty Buildings literally developed a new composite material to build its homes, making them more energy efficient and structurally sound.

The new composite solves general issues with the existing 3D process that still involves concrete

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