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‘Cheer’ star Jerry Harris assaulted 15-year-old in public bathroom, feds allege

Federal prosecutors say “Cheer” star Jerry Harris has “exploited and violated” at least 10 boys, “exhibits all the signs of a serial child predator” and should stay behind bars.

They also allege that Harris sexually assaulted a 15-year-old boy in an unlocked public bathroom at a cheer event “with other individuals coming and going” — suggesting either that he “wanted to be caught or he simply cannot control his impulses.”

The claims appear in a nine-page memo filed Tuesday ahead of a detention hearing for Harris, who was arrested by the FBI nearly a month ago and charged with production of child pornography. The memo also alleges Harris destroyed his cellphone upon learning of the investigation — and then continued to “victimize minor boys” with a new one.

Harris, 21, is being held at the downtown Metropolitan Correctional Center, prison records show.

Though the original criminal complaint filed against Harris alleged he had admitted having anal and oral sex with a 15-year-old at a cheer event last year, Tuesday’s memo from Assistant U.S. Attorney Christopher Parente adds new detail and says law enforcement has interviewed the victim. It also hints that more criminal charges could be filed against Harris.

Last month’s complaint also alleged the Netflix docuseries star tried to persuade another minor to engage in oral sex with him at cheerleading events, solicited a third minor for sex, and sought and received child pornography on Snapchat from 10 to 15 others he knew were underage.

Harris is scheduled to appear for a detention hearing Wednesday before U.S. Magistrate Judge Heather McShain. Parente’s memo suggests Harris’ legal team will be proposing Harris be monitored by multiple third-party custodians cycling in and out of his home. Harris’ lawyer Todd Pugh did not immediately respond to messages seeking comment, though.

Parente wrote

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Stapleton Public Schools board proposes bond issue for addition, remodeling at school | Education

The movement toward the project began in earnest last year, Hora said.

“We looked at the school and the board wanted to narrow it down to what they felt was really needed,” Hora said, “and to do it fiscally responsibly.”

A brochure identifies what the project would address: safety/security, non-code-compliant restrooms, substandard locker rooms, a non-private student health and services area, a congested commons area and aging parts of the building that are no longer adequate.

Gaffney said security to monitor who enters the building is inadequate.

“The camera system doesn’t take a very wide view and there may be more than one person wanting to check in,” Gaffney said. “In visiting with other superintendents, that’s a real safety issue.”

Another issue is the music room, which lacks adequate storage, Hora said. A new music room would be part of the addition on the east side of the building and would offer adequate storage space for music equipment, she said.

The current office space and music room would be opened up to create a larger commons area, and the concession stand would occupy part of that area as well.

“Then there are the locker rooms,” Hora said. “The junior high locker rooms are in the 1914 building in the basement. They’ve done a good job of trying to fix them up, but they are just inadequate.”

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London’s most magical and eccentric house reopens to the public this week

In the basement kitchen of Sir John Soane’s Museum in Lincoln’s Inn Fields – which reopens this week – there’s a mummified whippet half stuck into a bread roll. It’s not an insight into the domestic catering arrangements of one of England’s greatest architects. It’s part of a show called ‘Degrees of Truth’ by artist duo Langlands & Bell. Their works are scattered throughout the house, which now has a one-way system in place. The exhibition closed along with the museum back in March. Langlands & Bell found the grisly dried-out pooch on a stall in Brick Lane market and incorporated it into their work. You sort of picture the dog alive and in the house, snoozing in front of the range. Then you realise that this connection is momentary – the dog and the house have interacted for the first and only time in their respective histories.

Sir John Soane's Museum
Photograph: Chris Waywell

Sir John Soane’s London house makes time work like this. It’s full of dead things. I mean, full. The architect, who was responsible for the Bank of England, Dulwich Picture Gallery, Pitzhanger Manor and many other significant commissions, made his own home a strange and delirious living museum of the dead, with a ‘sepulchral chamber’ in the cellar containing a sarcophagus, statues of the dead, paintings of ruins. It’s not remotely morbid, or gloomy or gothic. It’s an artful balance of light and shade, colour and blackness: a dreamspace. 

Sir John Soane’s Museum
Photograph: Chris Waywell

Actually, Langlands & Bell are a weirdly good fit for Sir John Soane’s Museum. Their preoccupations – how spaces and buildings both reflect and define the individual, how power structures and physical structures overlap, how history and the future exist in the present – chime with many of Soane’s ideas: an avant-garde architect in thrall to

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Public health officials concerned about potential COVID exposure among evacuated residents of 2 nursing homes

Residents at two east Santa Rosa nursing homes that for months have successfully kept their patients free of COVID-19 were forced to evacuate their residents, sending them to evacuation centers, family homes and other facilities during the Glass fire earlier this week.

The emergency evacuations of those most vulnerable to the coronavirus pandemic is raising concerns among health officials of potential exposure to the virus in the community.

Spring Lake Village on Montgomery Drive and Summerfield Healthcare Center on Summerfield Road were both evacuated the night of the fire, their residents sent to several locations, including other nursing facilities, family homes and evacuation centers.

“It is very worrisome that people who had no contact to COVID had to potentially go to situations where they could be exposed to COVID, especially that vulnerable population that we’re trying to really keep safe,” said Dr. Sundari Mase, Sonoma County’s health officer.

Mase said the public health division has strict guidance for screening inside emergency shelters and evacuation centers. Evacuees are asked if they’ve come into contact with anyone who is COVID-positive, and temperatures are taken. Anyone who fails a temperature check or exhibits symptoms is tested for the virus.

“If anyone answers yes to these questions, they get a rapid test before they are allowed to to be in the shelter,” Mase said, adding that local public health staff members are working closely with the two skilled nursing homes to ensure that people are not sent somewhere where they might contract the virus.

That includes other skilled nursing homes that have had cases among their residents.

All 51 residents of Spring Lake Village on Montgomery Drive, near the north side of Annadel State Park, were taken to evacution centers at the Santa Rosa Veterans Memorial Building and the Petaluma Community Center the night

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Seneca One invites the public to see results of massive renovation project through series of new events

BUFFALO, N.Y. — Buffalo’s tallest building is coming back to life. 

There are people living in Seneca One for the first time, and it’s also a growing hub for technology and innovation in downtown Buffalo. Now, members of the public who are interested in seeing the results of Douglas Jemal’s more than $100 million dollar development project at the tower will have the opportunity to check it out, too. 

Seneca One has been hosting small group tours two days a week, which will continue into the fall on Wednesdays and Fridays. They’ve also announced two outdoor ticketed events in October, a dog adoption event on October 10, and a Bills watch party on for the primetime game against Kansas City on Thursday, October 15.

There’s a new food hall on the building’s third-floor lobby, which is open to the public Monday – Friday from 7:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m, featuring a toast bar and other stations. 

Douglas Development Corporation Director of Development Sean Heidinger says group yoga classes with Space on Seneca will be added to the schedule soon. 

Heidinger says that while they want to show off the building and have it be a source of civic pride for Western New Yorkers, they also want to keep their visitors and tenants safe. 

“What we can do with events and programming at this tower, even if you don’t live here, even if you don’t work here, we want to find way to work with our neighbors and provide opportunities for the public, for kids, to come here, to learn,” Heidinger told 2 On Your Side. “Seneca One is going to be the perfect place to do that. If we can engage kids at a young level, and they come here and they learn about M&T’s Tech academy, that could be

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