Regulations

Montana’s care homes struggle with staffing and ever-changing regulations as COVID-19 cases rise | State & Regional

During the first three months of the pandemic, Coe kept a bed in his office because he didn’t want to infect his family and wanted to reassure his staff he was there for them.

“Health care and our industry didn’t bring this to the state, but we’re living with choices everybody makes whether you gown up, mask up, you wash your hands — whatever happens, if it gets into the facility, we have to live with whatever happens,” Coe said.

‘Staff doesn’t grow on trees’

The Montana Health Care Association serves long-term care facilities in the state, and many have reached out to get answers and support, according to Rose Hughes, the association’s executive director.

“To me it has just brought forth a whole new experience and lots of questions about how should these things be handled,” Hughes said in an interview in September. “What can you do? Because staff doesn’t grow on trees and facilities have trouble hiring staff as it is.”

Hughes said that several assisted living facilities have reached out for help.

She said the association has asked DPHHS multiple times for written guidance for assisted living facilities.

“Usually the response was, well, they need to follow CDC guidance,” she said. But, trying to navigate the CDC website for answers can be daunting.

Source Article

Continue Reading

Relaxed regulations have calming effect on Cy-Fair area nursing homes

After a heart-breaking five months of isolation, seniors in area nursing homes and assisted living centers have some new options for seeing their loved ones.

At a press conference on Sept. 17, Gov. Greg Abbott announced a new visitation guidance for eligible nursing homes, assisted living facilities, intermediate care facilities, home and community-based service providers, and inpatient hospice effective Thursday, Sept. 24.

“I certainly applaud Gov. Abbott and the HHSC (Health and Human Services Commission) on working to reduce and relieve some of the restrictions with visitation,” said Derek Prince, CEO HMG Healthcare who manages Park Manor of CyFair.


“We value the psycho and social well-being and family relationships,” he said. “It’s been extremely trying for our patient population and our families. We’re excited to be able to put this stuff together,” he said.

With the relief comes a bit of grief as well.

“They are also burdensome and duplicitous from the guidance we received from CMS (Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services). It’s somewhat confusing at times,” he said.

“Slowly but surely we’re getting our arms around it and hopefully making a difference” the CEO said.

Prince described the visits under two categories: a regular visitor policy and an essential care worker designation.

Under the regular visitor policy, they are based on county positivity rates whether they are designated as indoor or outdoor visits. They can consist of outdoor no contact visits, open window visits, or indoor visitation with the use of plexiglass safety barriers, all attempts at preventing the spread of the coronavirus. There can be no physical contact between residents and visitors.

“Those can be scheduled by any loved one on

Continue Reading

How Contractors Are Managing Health And Safety Regulations

Contractors are moving forward with ongoing projects—in many cases—but have had the challenge of adapting to new health and safety protocols during the pandemic. This includes social distancing, using new technologies and creating new site plans. Water feature design and construction company OTL, which is known for installing interactive water fountains in commercial properties, says that these new adjustments were among the challenges of operating during the pandemic.

“As the health and safety of our team members and the public is always our top priority, we are experienced in keeping the public out of construction areas for projects like Graham Garden, where we were required to keep active construction areas clear while maintaining passage through the courtyard to the office buildings and on-site restaurants,” J. Wickham Zimmerman, CEO of OTL, tells GlobeSt.com. “With the new challenge of COVID-19, we developed ways to work effectively while maintaining social distancing between our crewmembers. Since this is not always possible, engineering controls are required in some cases.”

OTL also implemented its own health and safety strategy for workers. This helped keep projects moving. “We also implemented site-specific COVID-19 safety plans that cover items including daily screenings, revised procedures for safety meetings, travel to and from the job, and work on the job, including our interface with other contractors,” Zimmerman says.

In addition to crewmembers, Zimmerman says that the firm also had to find ways for the water features, which are interactive, to operate safely onsite. “While ensuring visitors are safe around our completed projects in light of COVID-19 may seem daunting, we were well-prepared for this challenge—especially in regard to our interactive water features. In fact, the issue of safe water in these interactive water features was being addressed long before this pandemic, and solutions continue to evolve in light of

Continue Reading

EU Court Backs Paris Regulations on Airbnb Rentals

The European Union’s top court backed a Parisian measure that regulates renting second homes on Airbnb. (iStock)

The European Union’s top court backed a Parisian measure that regulates renting second homes on Airbnb. (iStock)

The European Union’s top court ruled against two Parisian Airbnb hosts in a decision that could impact the short-term rental business’s operations throughout the continent.

The Court of Justice of the European Union ruled in favor of a Paris measure that requires property owners to get city approval to rent a second home on Airbnb, Reuters reported.

Parisian officials had fined two apartment owners for failing to secure those approvals. Airbnb was not a party to the case.
The issue went to a French court, which requested guidance on the issue. The CJEU said the measure was consistent with EU law and justified because it was “proportionate, limited in material and geographical scope, and doesn’t cover the rental of primary homes,” according to Reuters.

“Combating the long-term rental housing shortage constitutes an overriding reason relating to the public interest justifying such legislation,” the CJEU said.

The Parisian measure was designed to combat the loss of affordable housing in the city, since landlords can ask for higher rates on short-term stays than they can for traditional leases. Other cities, including Los Angeles, have instituted similar regulations on Airbnb rentals to combat affordable housing problems.

In a statement, Airbnb said that it welcomed the ruling to “help clarify the rules for hosts who share secondary homes in Paris.” It said the ruling would have little to no impact on its business in the city because most hosts rent their primary residences, but it’s unclear how it could affect short-term rentals in other European cities. [Reuters] — Dennis Lynch

Source Article

Continue Reading