rehab

Inmates cook up a storm in Changi catering kitchen as part of training, rehab programme, Courts & Crime News & Top Stories

SINGAPORE – When father-of-two Faruk was sentenced to seven years and 10 months’ jail in 2017 for drug-related offences, he did not expect to find a passion for decorating cakes or learning how to fold pastries while behind bars.

The 38-year-old, who declined to give his full name, spends six days a week in a kitchen as part of his work programme during his incarceration in the Changi Prison Complex.

While his family has yet to try his creations, the former mechanic hopes to make his sons, aged 12 and 13, their favourite strawberry cheesecake, when he is released.

“My family was surprised that I could bake cakes. I could see from their faces that they are happy I’m learning because I have never done this kind of thing before,” said Faruk in a phone interview on Wednesday (Oct 7). “(In the kitchen,) I learnt how to be patient, relax, and come up with more ideas to decorate (the cakes).”

He hopes to work in a pastry shop after his release.

About 30 or so inmates are chosen every year to work in The Changi Tearoom, after they have attended correctional programmes that support their rehabilitation.

They are chosen based on interest or prior experience working in the food and beverage sector. Other programmes include tailoring workshops and working in call centres.

Located in the prison complex, the catering kitchen serves as an industry-standard training ground for offenders.

It is managed by YR Industries, a subsidiary of the Yellow Ribbon Singapore. While the public can usually order catering services from the kitchen, it currently serves only prison staff in the light of Covid-19 safety measures.

Another offender, who wanted to be known only as Michael, said he refined his skills in The Changi Tearoom kitchen.

He is serving a 5½

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Telehealth Helps Patients Avoid Rehab in Nursing Homes


Telehealth policies have loosened since the pandemic began, helping feed the surge in at-home recoveries. Medicare has relaxed guidelines for the kinds of patients eligible for services that make rehab at home possible, and many insurance plans now cover those services.

“A lot of people don’t realize, when you check into a hospital, you really need to check out what the discharge plan will be,” says Elaine Ryan, vice president for state advocacy and strategy at AARP. “When you’re discharged, the question is: Can you receive in-home rehabilitation? And the answer is yes. You don’t have to go into those centers.”

Avoiding the nursing home

Nursing homes “were fighting a PR battle” even before the coronavirus swept the U.S. and sickened more than 238,000 residents, says Fred Bentley, managing director of Avalere Health. The pandemic has made that PR problem “way, way worse.”

“We are going to find patients who before COVID would have gone into a facility, no questions asked, and now they have options,” Bentley says.

That’s a problem for nursing homes, which for decades have depended on Medicare payments from short-term rehab patients. Many homes rely on Medicaid payments from long-term care residents but on Medicare reimbursements from short-term patients who’ve been discharged from the hospital after a fall, illness or elective procedure.

“Because Medicaid rates are quite low, [nursing homes] depend heavily on patients insured by Medicare, and Medicare pays for post-hospital care in nursing homes,” says the University of Pennsylvania’s Werner. Nursing homes averaged $544 per patient day in Medicare revenue from rehab patients last year, according to data from the National Investment Center for Seniors Housing & Care. That’s more than twice Medicaid’s rate of $216 per patient day from long-term care recipients.

But nursing homes’ Medicare revenue cratered when hospitals across the country

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Students begin ‘contagious and uplifting’ home rehab in Marion

MARION — Rather than building a new house and offering it for sale as they have for years, high school students in the Marion area this year are renovating a home for a low- to middle-income family.

The project, called Marion Community Build, is part of a class the students are taking. Through the class, they learn trade skills and work hands-on with tasks that go into rehabilitating a home.

The effort is a partnership among the city of Marion, Marion Independent School District and the Linn-Mar Community School District.

“This is a true community partnership,” said Nick Glew, president of the Marion Economic Development Corp. or MEDCO.

“Our organization was initially involved in this because of our Community Promise program, connecting our youth with high-demand jobs in our community. Sometimes they don’t understand there are opportunities right in their backyard.”

For 30 years, students have built brand-new homes to sell. This is the first year students are renovating an older home. Glew said the program hopes to continue to find homes to renovate, completing one every school year.

“We hope once we finish this property, we go to other neighborhoods,” Glew said. “We think it can be contagious and uplifting for neighbors. … This is going to have a beautiful impact across our community.”

MEDCO bought the home at 330 Eighth Ave. in Marion, which had been unoccupied for at least a decade, for $60,000 and reallocated its current revolving loan fund to provide capital for the improvements. The city will leverage a portion of low- and moderate-income funds to assist with costs associated with the construction, maintenance and future sale of the property.

“There are multiple great opportunities,” Marion Mayor Nick AbouAssaly said. “Students gain skills; the neighborhoods have some investment and revitalization. It’s an opportunity for the

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