renovation

Renovation of Ton Duc Thang Museum begins in HCM City

The renovation of the Ton Duc Thang Museum began in HCM City on Monday.

The museum, located on 6,021sq.m, will include a modern exhibition building of 2,000sq.m with a basement and four storeys.  

Renovation of Ton Duc Thang Museum begins in HCM City
Ton Duc Thang Museum attracted nearly 2 million visitors last year. Its rebuilding began in HCM City on October 12. The museum, located on an area of 6,021sq.m, will include five display areas that will feature images, documents and objects about the Communist Party of Vietnam, its establishment, role, leadership and developments. (Photo courtesy of the museum)

The building will have five display areas which will feature photos, documents and objects about the Communist Party of Vietnam and its establishment, role, leadership and development in different periods. 

The investment, VND275.7 billion (US$11million), came from the city’s budget.

According to the museum’s director Pham Thanh Nam, the museum’s artefacts and documents have been transferred for storage at the Ho Chi Minh Museum Branch.

Ton Duc Thang Museum is named after the late President Ton Duc Thang, founder of the first workers’ union in Vietnam in 1920. 

Thang was born in 1888 in An Giang Province’s Long Xuyen City. He joined the patriotic movement against the French colonialists at a young age.

He moved to France and participated in the workers’ movements there, as well as the uprising of the French Navy in the Black Sea in support of the October Revolution in Russia.

In the 1920s, he returned to Vietnam and led the workers’ movement in Sai Gon (now HCM City) with the Ba Son strike, the most prominent example of the movement’s activities. He joined and became a leader of the Vietnam Revolutionary Youth Union.

In 1929, the French colonialists arrested and sentenced him to 20 years in Con Dao Prison. One year later, he joined the

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Volvo Car Open tennis tournament will press on during major stadium renovation | Volvo Car Open

Canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic last April, the Volvo Car Open tennis tournament plans to return to action in 2021, tournament director Bob Moran says.

But it will do so without use of Volvo Car Stadium, which will undergo an extensive renovation as soon as City of Charleston permitting allows. For the 2021 tournament, the Volvo Car Open will construct a temporary stadium on the Althea Gibson Club Court, which will provide seating for up to 3,000 spectators for the WTA tournament on Daniel Island.

Work on the renovated Volvo Car Stadium should be completed by the fall of 2021, making it available when the Volvo Car Open celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2022, dating back to its days as the Family Circle Cup on Hilton Head Island.

“We are beyond excited with what this state of the art, world-class facility will become as a result of this renovation,” said Moran. “We can’t imagine a better way of celebrating our 50th year of tennis in 2022 and look forward to showing off the new facilities to our players, fans, partners and volunteers.”

The renovation of the 20-year-old Volvo Car Stadium will be funded by Ben and Kelly Navarro as a gift to the City of Charleston. Navarro, a Charleston businessman, and his wife are owners of Charleston Tennis LLC, which is the parent company of the Volvo Car Open, the stadium and the LTP Daniel Island facility. Ben Navarro bought the Volvo Car Open in 2018.

Upgrades to the stadium will include a multi-story “stage house” that will have player-wellness facilities such as premium locker rooms and physical therapy and exercise space. The building also will house media, production and food preparation areas, as well as a new VIP club level overlooking center court. The building also will be

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Beth Sholom celebrates 40 years with renovation and no coronavirus outbreaks

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (WAVY) – It’s a big year for Beth Sholom Village in Virginia Beach. The rehabilitation and senior living facility is celebrating 40 years in our community, the end of a major renovation, and no outbreaks during this coronavirus pandemic.

Beth Sholom Village takes the health of its residents and patients very seriously. So, when COVID-19 hit and workers learned seniors were high risk, the facility made some big policy changes.

“When somebody comes into our building for the very first time no matter whether they are coming from home, from the hospital, another facility, they go on what we created as an isolation unit,” explained Marcia Brodie, Marketing Director for Beth Sholom.

She said she feels like coming to work every day is one of the safest places she can be. “Every single staff member, I think we maybe have 320, is tested every single week. Tuesdays are our testing day.”

Marcia went on to say, “We’ve not allowed visitors in since March. So, a lot of people have not seen their loved one face-to-face.”

The only exception to that rule, Marcia said, is when a patient is nearing end of life.

Beth Sholom staff members also got very creative to make sure their residents could stay in touch with family.

“We did a lot of window visits. So, a family member is on the outside, the resident is on the inside. We have a staff member typically who facilitates with a cell phone. We’re not allowed to open the window, but they talk through the phone or an iPad.”

About a month and a half ago, the Beth Sholom team added a new plan to keep families connected. “We had a team build a plexiglass

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DVIDS – News – Under Secretary of Army McPherson tours schools, housing renovation site


FORT LEE, Va. (Oct. 13, 2020) — The Army’s second-highest-ranking civilian spent a good part of his day here Oct. 7 touring training facilities, conversing with troops and spotlighting efforts to improve privatized military family housing.

Under Secretary of the Army James McPherson received a glimpse of quartermaster and ordnance training, lunched with students at the Samuel Sharpe Dining Facility and addressed members of the media outside a newly renovated residence in the Jackson Circle neighborhood.

Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg, U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command and Fort Lee commanding general, hosted the undersecretary and accompanied him throughout the tour.

McPherson’s first stop was the QM School’s Petroleum and Water Department. There, he met with administrators, instructors and students. He also received a familiarization on the latest virtual training systems said to save time and resources while improving technical skills.

Advanced individual training Soldiers Spc. Zoya Goodwin, Pvt. Xavier Sullivan-Dixon and Pvt. Paden Bear were among those who briefed the undersecretary, walking him through a virtual training session.

“We have a new breed coming into the force, and they gravitate toward technology,” pointed out PWD Director Jose Hernandez, who was present for the briefing and spoke highly of the professionalism and confidence demonstrated by his junior Soldiers. “This is what they like, and when you mesh what they like with the learning experience, the confidence level just goes up.”

McPherson spent roughly an hour at PWD and later presented Soldiers and leaders with coins. Hernandez said he was thrilled senior leaders are taking an interest in virtual learning programs at the school and is always glad to demonstrate how students are benefiting from it.

“I thought it was a great visit,” Hernandez said. “It was good to have someone from the Pentagon visit us and see how

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