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Santa Rosa posts damage map with homes destroyed in Glass Fire

The city of Santa Rosa released a preliminary damage assessment map showing homes that were damaged or destroyed within the city limits by the Glass Fire.

The map displays home addresses and uses a color-coded system to show the degree of damage, from green (structure is safe to live in) to red (structure is destroyed and unsafe for habitation). The county will continue to add to the map as more homes impacted by the conflagration are identified.

Find the map here.

Cal Fire said in its Sunday night incident update that ground crews have now identified 235 destroyed homes in Sonoma County and 252 in Napa County. An additional 73 homes have been damaged in Sonoma County and 64 in Napa County.


Cal Fire Assistant Chief Billy See said in a Sunday morning press briefing that 12 inspection teams are on the ground assessing burn areas and about half of the fire zone has been surveyed.

More than 21,600 structures remain threatened in Napa and Sonoma counties.

The Glass Fire east of Santa Rosa had grown to nearly 65,000 acres with 26% containment as of Sunday night. Crews expanded containment lines as the gusty conditions subsided and a red flag warning for critical fire weather expired. Evacuations orders were reduced to warnings for multiple communities including Kenwood, Oakmont and Calistoga.

But while the fire’s eastern zone came under control, its northern edge burned actively and a new evacuation order was issued for north Napa County bordered on the west by Highway 29 at Livermore Road, on the north by the Lake County Line and on the east by Aetna Mine Road. A warning is in effect for the southern edge of Lake County.

Critically dry fuel (grasses, trees and brush) and very warm and dry weather conditions are contributing to

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Neighbor stays to help homes from burning on Mountain Hawk Drive in Santa Rosa

One resident of the Skyhawk Community in east Santa Rosa sent his family away Sunday night but vowed to stay and protect his home and those of neighbors.

Jas Sihota, 49, a radiology technician at Kaiser Permanente, worked to help save four neighborhood homes using garden hoses.

“I’m no cowboy, I just didn’t want to lose my house,” he said.

Sihota knew the situation was dire when he saw his maple tree bending from the wind Sunday night. Beyond that, he saw a completely red sky.

He told his family to leave and he remained, as he said he had done in previous evacuations for the Tubbs and Kincade fires.

Seeing embers the size of golf balls, Sihota sprayed the roofs of his house and several others before flames arrived. Later, he said, he saw fences and landscaping catch fire and doused them.

At least a dozen homes were destroyed in the Skyhawk Community, the bulk of which on the stretch of Mountain Hawk between Brigadoon Way and Nighthawk Drive.

Sihota’s home survived and he has remained in the neighborhood despite power being out. He purchased a whole home generator last year to power his house.

You can reach Staff Writer Kevin Fixler at 707-521-5336 or [email protected] On Twitter @kfixler.

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Fires rampage through wine country, destroying numerous homes in Santa Rosa

SANTA ROSA, CA - SEPTEMBER 28: The Shady Fire impacts structures along CA-12 on Monday, Sept. 28, 2020 in Santa Rosa, CA. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times) <span class="copyright">(Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times)</span>
SANTA ROSA, CA – SEPTEMBER 28: The Shady Fire impacts structures along CA-12 on Monday, Sept. 28, 2020 in Santa Rosa, CA. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times) (Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times)

California wine country was devastated by yet another series of wildfires overnight as flames destroyed numerous homes and other buildings in Napa and Sonoma counties and thousands were forced to run for their lives in the darkness of night.

A number of homes began to burn early Monday in the suburban eastern neighborhoods of Santa Rosa. The city of 177,000 residents, Sonoma County’s most populous, was devastated three years ago by the Tubbs fire — also driven by strong winds — that destroyed about 1,500 homes in the northwestern Coffey Park neighborhood, which was mostly built in the 1980s.

On Monday, it was the suburban northeastern neighborhoods of Santa Rosa that were burning, this time from the Shady fire.

Whipped by powerful hot and dry Diablo winds coming from the north and east, which showered embers onto the city, flames engulfed houses in the area of Mountain Hawk Drive, which is lined with two-story tract homes in the Skyhawk development, built in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

The number of structures lost was still unclear.

Deer were seen fleeing as firefighters battled the flames before dawn Monday.

Large swaths of Santa Rosa were under mandatory evacuation orders. Districts in the city’s northeast were ordered to empty, including the neighborhoods of Calistoga, Skyhawk, Melita, Stonebridge, the Oakmont retirement community and Pythian.

Busloads of older people were evacuated from the Oakmont Gardens assisted-living community as flames could be seen in the distance. Elsewhere in the city, cars jammed narrow roads as residents heeded evacuation orders.

Two other fires were also burning upwind of the fire encroaching on Santa Rosa,

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Wine Country fires burn homes, force evacuations from Santa Rosa to Napa Valley

The Wine Country awoke in flames Monday as windblown wildfires closed in on the Napa Valley from the east and west and swept into Santa Rosa, forcing thousands of North Bay residents to flee their homes in an ominous flashback to the catastrophic infernos three years ago.

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