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5 Reasons To Book A Bath Staycation While Lockdown Rules Still Allow It

From ELLE

For the last decade or two, with increasingly reasonable air travel, brilliant house swaps and inventive boutique hotels to be booked at first swipe, Instagram inspo and some of the best city guides ferreting out secret sources of joy and relatively undiscovered charm, travelling the world has become a widely undertaken and easy rite of passage.

Sadly, the pandemic has brought much of the above to its knees. Long haul travel has quickly become frightening and, in many cases, off-limits. Even short stints across the channel come with fresh disadvantages, such as the chance that the government’s Covid-19 rules will change while you’re abroad, throwing your return (and potential quarantine period) into question.

Luckily, necessity is the master of all invention. And like a phoenix rising from the ashes of our habitual trip across the world, staycationing around the UK has become a lifeline for those who can’t live without a dose of escapism. We’ve sought out the best glamping sites in the UK for getting back to nature, explored which of the sea front coastal cottages are worth booking ASAP, for those short on time, just looking for a night away to be completely pampered, we’ve identified some of London’s most luxurious hotels, and for the few who actually can’t leave their houses at all, we’ve even brought you the means for virtual tourism.

As we reach a new juncture in the course of the pandemic – a second lockdown, with some cities in particular closing their borders for a time, to limit the spread – our choices have once again narrowed. But while a few continue to welcome guests, we’re looking at which of the UK’s historical hotspots are worth booking a trip to right away.

While Leicester, Manchester and some places in the Midlands look

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A new kitchen that breaks the rules |

You and your partner yeYou and your partner yearn for a remodeled kitchen. Problem is, you prefer a sleek modern look while your significant other insists on a more elaborate classical approach. Fortunately, there’s room for compromise in the form of a transitional kitchen, which was recently voted the most popular kitchen design style (chosen by 88%) among surveyed members of the National Kitchen & Bath Association.

Julie Assenberg, owner of Julie Assenberg Interior Design, LLC in Salt Lake City, explains that “transitional” is a fairly new term in the design world that harmonizes elements of both traditional and contemporary design —offering the best of both worlds.

“It’s popular because it fits well in homes of varying architectural styles and can suit almost any aesthetic,” she says. “Transitional design is also appealing because there are no rules, except to ensure that all the elements you choose play well together.”

Danielle DeBoe Harper, interior designer and senior creative content manager with Moen in North Olmsted, Ohio, echoes that thought.

“Warm and inviting, transitional kitchens often blend contemporary elements with the ornate comforts of more classic aesthetics. For example, fixtures and appliances are simple yet sophisticated, featuring either straight lines or rounded profiles. Finishes and textures are mixed throughout the space, such as on countertops, hardware and other details,” says Harper. “Because they offer design flexibility, transitional kitchens are in demand among homeowners who don’t want to confine themselves to a single style.” And it’s a trend that has staying power, too.

“Transitional provides a beautiful level of detail without being gaudy and overdone, thus preventing the design from being dated. It’s a nice, safe choice for homeowners to select —one that promises longevity,” says Dessie Sliekers, interior designer with Ankeny, Iowa-located Slick Designs.

But it’s a look that can backfire if

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Kent hospital ordered to ‘make significant improvements’ after staff fail to follow Covid-19 hygiene rules

A hospital in Kent has been ordered to ‘make significant improvements’ after staff failed to follow Covid-19 regulations.



a sign in front of a building


© Provided by Evening Standard


Inspectors found that some staff at the William Harvey Hospital, run by East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust, were failing to wash their hands properly after caring for suspected virus patients.

Others seen to wear PPE incorrectly on the Covid-19 ward. Following an inspection by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) on August 11, the watchdog ordered “urgent enforcement action” by requiring that the emergency department was risk-assessed for social distancing and coronavirus risks.

The CQC also found that staff did not always use alcohol hand gel on entering and leaving wards, and at least seven members of staff were seen entering and leaving a ward caring for patients with suspected Covid-19 without washing their hands properly.

The emergency department staff also did not always have access to hand gel or hand washing facilities, with hand sanitiser dispensers remaining empty at both entrances even after the inspectors had raised the issue.

And inspectors found there was an inconsistent approach to triaging patients with Covid-19 symptoms in the emergency department.

Staff did not always wear PPE correctly in the emergency department, including failing to remove it between clinical areas and patient bays, and they did not always use the correct PPE, the inspectors said.

They also highlighted that cleaning schedules were not kept up to date, meaning they were unsure that the wards had been cleaned properly.



a man holding a sign: Urgent action was ordered by the CQC (AFP via Getty Images)


© Provided by Evening Standard
Urgent action was ordered by the CQC (AFP via Getty Images)

The inspectors said that not all rooms had signs to indicate how many people were permitted to be in that area while being able to socially distance, although managers told inspectors that every room should

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William Harvey Hospital in Kent is ordered to make ‘significant improvements’ Covid-19 rules fail

William Harvey Hospital in Kent is ordered to make ‘significant improvements’ after nurses were found failing to follow Covid-19 rules

  • Care Quality Commission found nurse on Covid ward wore a mask incorrectly
  • Staff failed to use hand sanitiser going in and out of some hospital wards
  • Social distancing room regulations were also unclear in the medical centre 

A hospital has been ordered to make ‘significant improvements’ after ward and emergency department staff – including a nurse on a Covid ward – were found failing to comply with pandemic rules.

The William Harvey Hospital, run by East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust, was given a health check by the Care Quality Commission on August 11.

But dismayed inspectors have now ordered ‘urgent enforcement action’ and the emergency department to be risk-assessed for social distancing and coronavirus risks.

They found that staff did not always wear personal protective equipment correctly in medical wards as well as on the Covid-19 ward.

One member of the nursing team also seen incorrectly wearing a mask on a ward which had seen an outbreak of the disease.

William Harvey Hospital which is run by East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation

William Harvey Hospital which is run by East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation

They also found that staff did not always use alcohol hand gel on entering and leaving wards and at least seven members of staff were seen entering and leaving a ward caring for patients with suspected Covid-19 without washing their hands properly.

The emergency department staff also did not always have access to hand gel or hand washing facilities, with hand sanitiser dispensers remaining empty at both entrances even after the inspectors had raised the issue.

And inspectors found there was an inconsistent approach to triaging patients

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Arizonans in nursing homes and hospitals can vote by video in some circumstances, judge rules

Election officials in Arizona can use videoconferencing to help some voters confined to hospitals, nursing homes or living with severe disabilities cast their ballots, a judge ruled Monday, rejecting calls to declare the new pandemic-era practice illegal.



a group of people standing in front of a sign: People wash their hands by the entrance to Sapphire of Tucson Nursing and Rehab on May 1, 2020.


© David Wallace/The Republic
People wash their hands by the entrance to Sapphire of Tucson Nursing and Rehab on May 1, 2020.

Attorney General Mark Brnovich asked the court to strike down plans adopted by the Maricopa County Recorder’s Office and Arizona Secretary of State’s Office for limited “virtual” voting assistance, arguing that state law does not allow anyone to cast a ballot by video.

Gov. Doug Ducey also opposed the policies, contending that state law requires officials provide such services in person.

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But in a ruling that reflected how unusual this election year is, Maricopa County Superior Court Judge Randall H. Warner found that videoconferencing may be necessary for some voters with very particular circumstances who would otherwise have to choose between protecting themselves from COVID-19 or forgoing their right to participate in the electoral process.

“Federal law does not allow Arizona to impose on a disabled voter the choice between voting and protecting their health,” he wrote.

The judge warned, however, that his ruling “does not mean the County Recorder is free to use video voting whenever he wants or for any voter who asks.”

Still, Fontes declared victory.

“This is a win for accessibility,” the county recorder said in a statement. “We will continue to provide this option to the most vulnerable population of Maricopa County voters when necessary, ensuring compliance with all applicable law.”

A longstanding practice and COVID-19

The legal battle over the practice began in earnest last week but stems from

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