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$1,325,000 Homes for Sale in Connecticut, California and South Carolina

One might have thought the most interesting thing about this house in southeastern Connecticut was that it belongs to Chris Elliott, the actor, comedian and writer, and his wife, Paula Niedert. But just as compelling is the identity of a previous owner: a local celebrity named Elizabeth Tashjian, better known as the Nut Lady. In 1972, Ms. Tashjian, an artist who inherited the property from her father, turned it into a cult attraction called the Nut Museum, ultimately charging three dollars and one nut as an entrance fee.

The Elliotts bought the house from a subsequent owner in 2008. Although it had been fixed up and endowed with central air-conditioning, they polished it, bringing in vintage and period-style fixtures, moldings and glass, and recreating a Victorian ambience with 21st-century comforts.

Old Lyme is a town about 100 miles northeast of New York and 120 miles southwest of Boston, with a seafaring past and a historically protected Main Street. This property is yards from the Lieutenant River boat launch and half a mile northeast of Ferry Landing State Park on the Connecticut River. According to Flood Factor, an online evaluation tool, its flood risk is minimal.

Size: 5,289 square feet

Price per square foot: $251

Indoors: Turning right from the central foyer and descending a few steps, you find a living room with hardwood floors, huge leaded casement windows and a ceiling ornamented with plaster moldings and hung with crystal chandeliers. The room extends more than 43 feet to the back of the house, ending with a red-marble fireplace topped by an elaborate mantel and mirror. A wide doorway hung with curtains on the left side of

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10 Homes With Art Galleries for Sale Around the Country

If you have been told you have an eye for art and are in search of a new business opportunity, there’s no time like the present. Ditch your desk job, and open up an art gallery!

We’ll paint you a picture. Art galleries—in a mix of urban settings and small towns, in historic structures and newer buildings—have popped up for sale across the country.

From New York City to small-town Wisconsin, we’ve found 10 art galleries for you to ponder. Step back and really look at these properties. We think you’ll appreciate what you see.

And as with any work of fine art, the cost varies. On this list alone, the price to become a proprietor of an art gallery ranges from $147,000 all the way up to $35 million.

Price: $699,000

Drop anchor in an oceanfront community founded in 1642. The eye-catching dusty blue and bright purple exterior of this 2,299-square-foot home should be a tipoff that this is a place for creative types.

Dating to 1900, the building offers enough space for a one-bedroom apartment upstairs and an art gallery (and studio) on the first floor. The waters of Smith Cove sit across the street, and Rocky Neck—America’s oldest art colony—is a tourist-rich area.

37 Rocky Neck Ave., Unit 1B, Gloucester, MA

realtor.com

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Price: $579,900

Included in the sale of a three-bedroom home is a large barn that has served as an art gallery, called Gallery @ 85 Main.

Buyers with an artistic eye will also be enchanted by a reflecting pool surrounded by mature landscaping. The gallery hugs 90 feet of water frontage and is located about two hours from the hubs of New York City and Boston—an ideal locale for attracting weekend travelers.

85 Main St., Essex, CT

realtor.com

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Price: $380,000

Located near Palm

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S.F. homes for sale hit a 15-year-high, as deluge of new condos flood the market

San Francisco’s residential real estate market saw brisk activity from July through September with a steep increase in both sales and inventory, as a significant jump in buyers was not enough to keep up with the deluge of new condos and homes flooding the marketplace, according to a new report from the brokerage Compass.



a person standing in front of a building: San Francisco’s residential real estate market saw brisk activity from July through September with a steep increase in both sales and inventory.


© Gabrielle Lurie / The Chronicle

San Francisco’s residential real estate market saw brisk activity from July through September with a steep increase in both sales and inventory.


The number of sales rose 30.2% compared to the third quarter last year, climbing from 1,151 to 1,499 transactions. But the number of listings is at a 15-year high, with a 10-month inventory for condos in some neighborhoods. Comparing September to the same month last year, the number of price reductions was up 172% for houses and condos combined. Of the price reductions, 80% were of condos.

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“The issue is the inventory is increasing so much faster than the sales rate,” said Patrick Carlisle, chief market analyst for Compass. “Any time you have this relatively huge overhang of supply, and demand is stable, you are going to see price reductions.”

The market was bifurcated: single-family homes did better than condos; large homes were more popular than smaller homes; and many downtown high-rise offerings languished while listings in more suburban neighborhoods tended to trade faster and slightly above asking price.

The contrast between the single-family homes and condos was apparent in price, how long a property sat on the market, and whether the asking price had to be cut to attract buyers. The median sales for single-family homes inched up year over year from $1.57 million to $1.66 million while condo prices lagged, dipping slightly from $1.275 million to $1.250 million. Single-family listings sold at an average

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S.F. homes for sale hit a 15-year-high, deluge of condos flood the market

San Francisco’s residential real estate market saw brisk activity from July through September with a steep increase in both sales and inventory, as a significant jump in buyers was not enough to keep up with the deluge of new condos and homes flooding the marketplace, according to a new report from the brokerage Compass.



a person standing in front of a building: San Francisco’s residential real estate market saw brisk activity from July through September with a steep increase in both sales and inventory.


© Gabrielle Lurie / The Chronicle

San Francisco’s residential real estate market saw brisk activity from July through September with a steep increase in both sales and inventory.


The number of sales rose 30.2% compared to the third quarter last year, climbing from 1,151 to 1,499 transactions. But the number of listings is at a 15-year high, with a 10-month inventory for condos in some neighborhoods. Comparing September to the same month last year, the number of price reductions was up 172% for houses and condos combined. Of the price reductions, 80% were of condos.

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“The issue is the inventory is increasing so much faster than the sales rate,” said Patrick Carlisle, chief market analyst for Compass. “Any time you have this relatively huge overhang of supply, and demand is stable, you are going to see price reductions.”

The market was bifurcated: single-family homes did better than condos; large homes were more popular than smaller homes; and many downtown high-rise offerings languished while listings in more suburban neighborhoods tended to trade faster and slightly above asking price.

The contrast between the single-family homes and condos was apparent in price, how long a property sat on the market, and whether the asking price had to be cut to attract buyers. The median sales for single-family homes inched up year over year from $1.57 million to $1.66 million while condo prices lagged, dipping slightly from $1.275 million to $1.250 million. Single-family listings sold at an average

Continue Reading

S.F. homes for sale at 15-year high as listings outpace buyers

San Francisco’s residential real estate market saw brisk activity from July through September with a steep increase in both sales and inventory, as a significant jump in buyers was not enough to keep up with the deluge of new condos and homes flooding the marketplace, according to a new report from the brokerage Compass.



a large body of water with a city in the background


© Nick Otto / Special To The Chronicle


The number of sales rose 30.2% compared to the third quarter last year, climbing from 1,151 to 1,499 transactions. But the number of listings is at a 15-year high, with a 10-month inventory for condos in some neighborhoods. Comparing September to the same month last year, the number of price reductions was up 172% for houses and condos combined. Of the price reductions, 80% were of condos.

Loading...

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“The issue the inventory is increasing so much faster than the sales rate,” said Patrick Carlisle, chief market analyst for Compass. “Any time you have this relatively huge overhang of supply, and demand is stable, you are going to see price reductions.”

The market was bifurcated: single-family homes did better than condos; large homes were more popular than smaller homes; and many downtown high-rise offerings languished while listings in more suburban neighborhoods tended to trade faster and slightly above asking price.

The contrast between the single-family homes and condos was apparent in price, how long a property sat on the market, and whether the asking price had to be cut to attract buyers. The median sales for single-family homes inched up year over year from $1.57 million to $1.66 million while condo prices lagged, dipping slightly from $1.275 million to $1.250 million. Single-family listings sold at an average of 102.5% of listing price while condos went for an average of 97.5% of listing price.

Even within the condo segment

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