salvation

This former Salvation Army hall has been converted into a stunning modern home

A former Salvation Army charity hall in Sydney’s inner west suburb of Leichhardt has been converted into a gorgeous modern home complete with cathedral ceilings, a resort-style bath and garden.

The shell of the 1916 building remains untouched in its original exterior form, while the interior has been entirely transformed and brought into 2020.

After entering through the 200-year-old Argentinian front door, guests are welcomed into the home with high cathedral ceilings, unique fixtures, engineered flooring and a relaxing garden at the back. 

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A former Salvation Army charity hall in Sydney's inner west suburb of Leichhardt has been converted into a gorgeous modern home

A former Salvation Army charity hall in Sydney’s inner west suburb of Leichhardt has been converted into a gorgeous modern home

The shell of the 1916 building seems to remain untouched in its original exterior form, while the interior has been entirely transformed and brought into 2020

The shell of the 1916 building seems to remain untouched in its original exterior form, while the interior has been entirely transformed and brought into 2020 

The newly renovated property is currently listed on the market for $4.2 million and is certainly unlike any other home in the inner west

The newly renovated property is currently listed on the market for $4.2 million and is certainly unlike any other home in the inner west

The current owners purchased the property from the Salvation Army 23 years ago in a run-down condition and decided a renovation was necessary.

The property is listed with Cobden & Hayson’s Ben Southwell and is located on 54-56 Carlisle Street – only six kilometres from Sydney’s CBD.

Mr Southwell said during the renovation the owners wanted to make sure the hall keeps its sense of character.

‘They wanted to do something sympathetic to the original design,’ he said.

‘Everything has been in such a way to ensure it takes nothing away from the hall like the extension, which blends effortlessly into the rest of the hall.’

The current owners purchased the property from the Salvation Army 23 years ago in a run-down condition and decided a renovation was necessary

The current owners purchased the property from the Salvation Army 23 years ago in a run-down condition and decided a renovation was necessary

The kitchen features a commercial gas stove, island bench and stunning stone benchtops along with unique recycled lighting and doors

The kitchen features a commercial gas stove, island bench and stunning stone benchtops

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Murphy said this test could be our ‘salvation.’ So why isn’t it in nursing homes? | Editorial

Gov. Phil Murphy has done well steering our state through this pandemic, but one big stain on his record is nursing homes.

He blundered in numerous ways: Putting hospitals first, even as the death toll exploded in the nursing homes, failing to get them protective equipment and test kits quickly, and forcing them to take COVID patients from hospital wards.

Now it looks like another misstep is in the works. Rutgers has developed an excellent COVID test that is faster and easier – you just spit in a tube, and it’s analyzed by a lab in 24 to 48 hours.

Nursing homes need it, desperately. It’s not easy to shove a swab down the nasal cavity of an 80-year-old dementia patient, let alone get the results back in a timely manner. Yet they still don’t have it, as we face the threat of a possible resurgence.

Neither do veteran’s homes, which saw the worst death rates. Murphy said this rapid test could be the source of our “salvation” back in April. So why don’t we even have it in our own state-run homes?

Both NJ Transit and Port Authority are further ahead in line, which is disappointing. It shows a lack of urgency where the fire is burning hottest.

“You put your quickest, most accurate test in your most vulnerable population,” as Dr. Perry Halkitis, dean of the Rutgers School of Public Health says. “That’s what should be happening.”

State-run psychiatric hospitals and developmental centers have shown progress on this, too, but the nursing home industry has been mired in bureaucracy with the state, NJ Advance Media’s Ted Sherman reports.

Under state guidelines, only slower swab testing has been allowed, and they haven’t been able to require testing for visitors, like a state inspector or a family member. Requiring temperature

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