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Nearly three times more COVID deaths in Mississippi’s for-profit nursing homes, analysis shows | State Government

Twice as many residents caught COVID-19 at Mississippi’s for-profit nursing homes, and nearly three times more died there, an analysis of health data by the Mississippi Center for Investigative Reporting shows.

The average number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in these for-profit homes? Four in 10 residents.

One possible factor: 80% of Mississippi’s nursing homes had already been cited for infection-control problems before the pandemic hit.

Charlene Harrington, a professor emeritus at the University of California at San Francisco who discovered similar results in a just-released study of nursing homes in California, said the current pandemic is exposing problems that have persisted for decades. “We’ve just looked the other way for 30 years,” she said.

OSHA has been investigating three nursing homes in Mississippi, all of them for-profit, for workplace catastrophes or fatalities, including Lakeside Health & Rehabilitation Center in Quitman. One of the home’s nursing assistants, Carole Faye Doby of Stonewall, died of COVID May 15, and two residents also died of the disease.

A week or more before she contracted the coronavirus, Doby warned her family that “things were getting bad at the nursing home, and that we didn’t need to come around,” recalled her daughter, Shenika Jackson of Clinton.

She said her mother shared that a fellow worker and a resident (who later died) had both come down with the disease.

On May 6, Doby was tested for COVID. Days later, they saw her on Mother’s Day, Jackson said. “We did see her on Sunday, Mother’s Day. We sat outside the porch and ate lunch. She was inside the window.”

By May 11, her mother still didn’t have results and continued to get sicker so she saw a doctor, who had her rushed to the hospital by ambulance, Jackson said.

Because of COVID, she couldn’t visit with her

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Study Shows Black Americans Are Paying More to Own Homes

In a new study from MIT, it has been reported that Black Americans are often forced to pay more than any other group of individuals to own a home.

CNN reports that Black homeowners on average pay more in mortgage interest, mortgage insurance, and property taxes than other homeowners. Written by Edward Golding, MIT’s executive director of the Golub Center for Finance and Policy, the paper concludes that the vast difference between what Black homeowners and white homeowners pay indicates that it’s considerably more difficult for Black homeowners to accumulate wealth through ownership at the same rate as white homeowners. 

The differences between mortgage payments is $743 per year, mortgage insurance premiums $550 per year, and property taxes at $390 per year. Totaling $13,464 “over the life of the line,” the gap could result in up to $67,320 in lost retirement savings. 

“The small differences compounding over the life of the mortgage and during home ownership can add up,” writes Golding. “Even if it is a few hundred dollars a year here and there, it can amount to another year’s salary families would otherwise have.”

Golding added that the “Black-white income gap of $25,800 is exacerbated by this ‘Black tax’ on homeownership.” The study also indicates that Black households aren’t getting as many opportunities to refinance their mortgages to lower rates, which has resulted in many Black households paying a further $475 per year more than white households.

“Nearly a quarter of the disparity in homeownership costs for Black homeowners is due to local property tax assessments,” the paper reads. “A fair homeownership system must reform these inequitable federal, state, and local policies.”  

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Looking for Escapist TV? Try Home Design Shows

A few minutes into an episode of “Dream Home Makeover,” a home improvement series premiering on Netflix on Oct. 16, an anxious homeowner frets about a minor flaw in the family-room fireplace, an asymmetry that the wife describes as “pretty dramatic.”

If you’ve watched enough home improvement television, you know this scene is meant to cue the eye rolls. But Shea McGee, the show’s perky co-star and the creative force behind the Salt Lake City design firm Studio McGee, cheerfully downplays the issue, promising the couple that the half-inch error will fade into the background once their grand 7,900-square-foot home is complete.

Her down-to-earth approach soothes her clients’ nerves, but also threads a needle for Netflix, which has decided that the salve homebound Americans need right now is an escapist lineup of shows about how to make the homes we can’t escape look prettier. In recent months, the network has rolled out a handful of new home improvement shows to a viewership that is looking for ways to spruce up their spaces, but also ambivalent about celebrating other people’s good fortune.

Over the summer, Netflix aired “Million Dollar Beach House,” a series that followed a team of high-end real estate brokers in the Hamptons as they tried to sell mansions to millionaires. But what was intended to be an East Coast alternative to “Selling Sunset,” the popular, brash series about Los Angeles brokers, was a flop. The show lacked the Botox and catty drama that made “Selling Sunset” a delicious hate watch. Instead, the show was skewered on social media by viewers who were outraged that the only Black broker on the show endured a series of racist microaggressions at a moment when Americans were laser focused on racial justice. Netflix has not announced a second season for the show.

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CoreLogic Risk Analysis Shows Hurricane Delta Threatens 293,685 Homes with Storm Surge Damage

—With striking similarities to Hurricane Laura, Hurricane Delta threatens the same coastal towns already struggling to recover—

CoreLogic® (NYSE: CLGX), a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released data analysis showing 293,685 single-family and multifamily homes across Louisiana and the U.S. Gulf Coast with a reconstruction cost value (RCV) of approximately $62.85 billion are at potential risk of storm surge damage from Hurricane Delta based on its projected Category 2 status at landfall. These estimates are based on the October 7, 5 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) National Hurricane Center forecast.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201008005338/en/

Hurricane Delta: Number of Homes at Storm Surge Risk and Associated Reconstruction Cost Value (Graphic: Business Wire)

“After battering the Yucatán Peninsula near Cancún, Mexico, Hurricane Delta is headed for the Gulf Coast just weeks after Hurricane Laura brought significant wind and storm surge damage to the Texas and Louisiana coastlines,” said Curtis McDonald, meteorologist and senior product manager of CoreLogic. “Residents in these coastal areas are already trying to recover from their losses and are now faced with a second substantial storm. This season has been relentless, and Louisianans should be prepared for the long recovery road ahead.”

As Hurricane Delta approaches the Gulf, its path will become more certain and the metropolitan areas at risk will narrow. For the most up-to-date storm surge exposure estimates, visit the CoreLogic natural hazard risk information center, Hazard HQ™, at www.hazardhq.com.

The primary threats as Hurricane Delta makes landfall in central Louisiana will be storm surge and damaging winds. Heavy rainfall is also expected, but a fast storm speed is expected to limit catastrophic inland flooding. CoreLogic catastrophe and weather experts expect the 2020 hurricane season to continue on its above-average trend given warmer oceanic

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No. 17 LSU Football Shows Major Improvements on Both Sides of the Ball in Week Two Win

The Tigers found their groove on defense and offense against the Commodores. The game proved that both sides of the football are steadily improving.

After a disappointing opening game, No. 17 LSU (1-1) really played well against Vanderbilt. Better effort, more energy, and definitely a higher level of focus showed for both the offense and defense. The Tigers were led by one of their best players.

Derek Stingley, Secondary, Lead the Way

Anytime you hold an opponent’s quarterback to 11 for 25 passing and 113 yards, the secondary did its job. More importantly, it’s how and when the LSU secondary did it’s job.

With Stingley not giving up a single reception, it allowed the other Tigers to concentrate on just their job. Vanderbilt did challenge Stingley, as the preseason All-American broke up a pass in the end zone and was stuck to his man like glue for most of the evening. His teammates followed suit.

There were much better angles being taken by the defensive backs, and it showed. This was especially true during the first drive by Vanderbilt.

A quick screen left saw a host of Tigers sprint towards the football and drop the wide receiver for a loss. That blown up screen pass set the tone for the evening. That energy, that drive to dominate, it showed up for the purple and gold secondary.

Perhaps one of the reasons LSU started playing really well stemmed from playing more cover one (man defense) during the second half. LSU mixed up its coverages in the first half and Vanderbilt did run the football well. LSU allowed 107-yards rushing during the first half. The second half went LSU’s way.

With LSU manning up on the outside during the second half, the safeties and linebackers really keyed the run. That helped LSU

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