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Some states raising doubts about federal tests sent to nursing homes

Several states have curtailed using coronavirus testing equipment in nursing homes that was provided by the Trump Administration after concerns were raised about the results, including false positives that risk mistakenly sending vulnerable seniors into special COVID isolation wings that could ultimately expose them to the virus.



a plastic bag: A medical center worker holds an antibody tests kit in White Plains, N.Y., April 29, 2020.


© View Press/Corbis via Getty Images, FILE
A medical center worker holds an antibody tests kit in White Plains, N.Y., April 29, 2020.

Since July, the administration had been rushing out the machines from manufacturers Becton, Dickinson and Company and Quidel to more than 14,000 facilities around the country in an attempt to identify outbreaks faster and stem the tide of the virus, which has taken a particular toll on the elderly, especially those in nursing homes and other assisted living facilities.

“We have a real crisis around testing,” said Dr. Michael Osterholm, an epidemiologist and director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota. “We don’t have the capacity to supply every facility with … the more reliable and accurate tests and the tests we do have are not accurate and unreliable.”

The machines process cheaper-to-produce kits known as antigen tests — which can yield results in 15 minutes. While other diagnostic tests for COVID-19 like PCR tests look for genetic material from the virus, antigen tests look for molecules on the surface of the virus, diagnosing an active coronavirus infection faster than molecular tests.

Although they are not perfect, many experts view these tests as an important component in the effort to fight COVID-19. The rapid turnaround time means they can be used in bulk to screen dozens of people in quick succession, with any potentially positive cases later confirmed with a more accurate PCR test. These are the tests, for instance, that the

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Some states raising doubts about federal tests sent to nursing homes, citing shaky reliability

Several states have curtailed using coronavirus testing equipment in nursing homes that was provided by the Trump Administration after concerns were raised about the results, including false positives that risk mistakenly sending vulnerable seniors into special COVID isolation wings that could ultimately expose them to the virus.

Since July, the administration had been rushing out the machines from manufacturers Becton, Dickinson and Company and Quidel to more than 14,000 facilities around the country in an attempt to identify outbreaks faster and stem the tide of the virus, which has taken a particular toll on the elderly, especially those in nursing homes and other assisted living facilities.

“We have a real crisis around testing,” said Dr. Michael Osterholm, an epidemiologist and director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota. “We don’t have the capacity to supply every facility with … the more reliable and accurate tests and the tests we do have are not accurate and unreliable.”

The machines process cheaper-to-produce kits known as antigen tests — which can yield results in 15 minutes. While other diagnostic tests for COVID-19 like PCR tests look for genetic material from the virus, antigen tests look for molecules on the surface of the virus, diagnosing an active coronavirus infection faster than molecular tests.

Although they are not perfect, many experts view these tests as an important component in the effort to fight COVID-19. The rapid turnaround time means they can be used in bulk to screen dozens of people in quick succession, with any potentially positive cases later confirmed with a more accurate PCR test. These are the tests, for instance, that the White House requires everyone to take before they enter the complex.

MORE: Faster, cheaper COVID-19 tests in danger of creating blindspot in data collection

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Dr Birx says Covid is now spreading in homes and she fears upticks in some of best-performing states

A member of the White House coronavirus response task force and one of the nation’s leading doctors warned a “very different” coronavirus spread was underway across the US than the one the country faced during the initial months of the global pandemic.



Deborah Birx wearing a suit and tie


© Provided by The Independent


The United States was experiencing a “very different” spread of the novel coronavirus in recent months than the wave of infections that swept over the country during the initial months of the global pandemic, a member of the White House coronavirus response task force has warned.

Dr Deborah Birx, one of the nation’s leading physicians, said Covid-19 was now spreading among Americans at social events — including family gatherings — where people are “taking their mask off and letting down their guard”.

Whereas the virus initially infected people in confined work spaces, on public transit and at large events, Dr Birx said many states have now adopted CDC guidelines and other measures to curb infections.

“The spread of the virus now is not occurring so much in the workplace as people have taken precautions,” she said. “It’s happening in homes and social occasions and people gathering and taking their mask off and letting down their guard and not physically distancing.”

Deborah Birx wishes US had locked down like Italy

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The doctor spoke as she was visiting the University of Connecticut, where she met with the state’s Democratic Governor Ned Lamont and discussed the school’s initiatives surrounding the coronavirus pandemic, according to the

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The State’s Largest Historic Renovation in Downtown Dallas Lights Up

Ten years ago, the vertical white lights on the former First National Bank tower were turned off after the building closed. Now the 55-year-old Elm Street landmark is being transformed as part of a $450 million redevelopment project. Award-winning real estate firm Todd Interests is developing office spaces for tenants like Downtown Dallas Inc., as well as luxury apartments, restaurants, retail, and a 219-room Thompson Hotel. Renamed The National, the 52-story high-rise is scheduled to open by the end of this year. The lights have already been turned back on.

This is one of the state’s largest adaptive reuse projects, and DDI will stake its claim on a bottom floor space that will be visible from the street. This has for years been downtown’s largest vacant block, a monstrous building covered in fencing whose developers just couldn’t get the financing to make what they called the Drever a reality. But then came Todd Interests, who picked up the baton and took the project forward. It was acquired in 2016 by Drever Capital Management, which remained as an advisory role once Shawn and Philip Todd came to the table in May of last year. They had to work quickly: work has to wrap by the end of the year in order for it to qualify for $100 million in tax credits.

Philip Todd once told D CEO that this project was “the most complicated and challenging adaptive reuse” project that he’d ever worked on. That would help explain why—in the public’s eye, at least—it has sat virtually untouched for years, a giant gash in the middle of a downtown that was thriving pre-pandemic. The 318 luxury apartments will include the 48th floor, making them the highest address in downtown.

What we see now is the largest historic renovation in Texas. That

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United States Home Decor Markets 2020-2027 by Product Type, Distribution Channel, Income Group, Price and Category

The “U.S. Home Decor Market by Product Type, Distribution Channel, Income Group, Price and Category: Opportunity Analysis and Industry Forecast, 2020-2027” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

The rise in popularity of eco-friendly home decor products among consumers, owing to increase in environment concerns significantly contribute toward the growth of the global market. Moreover, an increase in disposable income and improvement in living standards in the emerging countries such as China and India along with rise in affinity of consumers toward luxury home decor products augment the growth of the home decor market.

However, availability of low-quality and counterfeit products restricts the growth of the market. In addition, dearth of skilled labor, ineffective transportation, and lack of infrastructure facilities may act as a hindrance for the home decor market. On the contrary, The upsurge in demand for trendy, customized, and fashionable designs for home decor products and increase in popularity of home decor products among high-income consumers are anticipated to provide lucrative growth opportunities for the global home decor market.

The U.S. home decor market is segmented into product type, income group, price, distribution channel, and category. On the basis of product type, the market is divided into furniture, home textile, and floor covering. Depending on distribution channel, it is segregated into supermarkets and hypermarkets, specialty stores, e-commerce, and others. By income group, it is fragmented into lower-middle income, upper-middle income, and higher income. As per price point, it is categorized into mass and premium. Based on the category, the market is segmented into eco-friendly and conventional.

The U.S. Home Decor Market is segmented based on service type and end-user. Based on the service type the market is segmented into event management security service, watch service, personal protection, mobile patrol security service, pre-employment screening, and other services. Based on

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