Storm

Strong wind storm reportedly kills one, knocks out power for thousands of Puget Sound homes

Strong wind gusts whipped through the Puget Sound area and down the coast Tuesday, snapping branches and taking down utility poles, and reportedly killing one person and wiping out power for thousands of homes.

Wind gusts ranged from 30 to 40 mph throughout most of the region, with peak gusts at 48 mph in Seattle, said meteorologist Matthew Cullen of the National Weather Service Seattle. The wind storm came from a very strong low-pressure system that moved into northern Vancouver Island in British Columbia earlier Tuesday, combined with a front that extended across the region, he said.

Friday Harbor also saw 48 mph winds, while Olympia and Quillayute hit 45 to 46 mph gusts.

“It was pretty consistent up and down the coast,” Cullen said.

The person who died during the windstorm was clearing out a driveway on the Key Peninsula when a tree fell on them, Key Peninsula Fire spokeswoman Anne Nesbit told Q13 News Tuesday. No further information was immediately available.

Puget Sound Energy had responded to more than 77,000 outages by 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, caused primarily by tree branches blown into power lines, the utility service said. Seattle City Light reported more than 14,000 outages in southeast Seattle, northwest Seattle and Shoreline on Tuesday afternoon, though most had been restored by the evening.

State transportation officials also shut down several highways — including Highway 162 near Orting, Highway 121 in Tumwater and Highway 167 near Tacoma — Tuesday to clear away downed power lines and debris, the state Department of Transportation said on Twitter.

Cullen said the gusts were expected to continue to wind down as Tuesday night progressed and stay calmer on Wednesday.

Some showers are expected with a light breeze Wednesday, while Thursday should stay mostly dry with some morning clouds that are expected to

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North Korea’s Kim pledges thousands of new homes in storm recovery effort

By Sangmi Cha

SEOUL (Reuters) – North Korean leader Kim Jong Un promised to help typhoon-hit areas recover and to build at least 25,000 houses over the next five years, state media said on Wednesday.

Visiting one of the worst-hit areas of North Korea, Kim expressed regret over the more than 50-year-old houses in which people have been living and urged the military to embark on a more ambitious construction plan, KCNA said.

The visit came after Kim appeared to shed tears at the weekend as he thanked citizens for their sacrifices, in the most striking demonstration yet of how he is relying on his “man-of- the-people” persona to tackle his country’s deepening crises.

The military has reached a construction level of 60% for at least 2,300 houses in the Komdok area in South Hamgyong province, northeast of the capital, Pyongyang, the state media said.

Kim said new houses were now only built when the old ones were brought down by natural disasters, and called for a “revolution” in construction plans, starting with building 25,000 houses during his five-year plan set to be unveiled in January.

Last week, Kim called on his country to embark on an 80-day “speed battle” – to attain economic goals before a congress in January to decide the new five-year plan.

North Korea has had a tough year because of the impact of anti-coronavirus measures, international sanctions and several typhoons that battered towns.

(Reporting by Sangmi Cha; Editing by Peter Cooney)

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North Korea’s Kim pledges thousands of new homes in storm recovery effort: state media

By Sangmi Cha

SEOUL (Reuters) – North Korean leader Kim Jong Un promised to help typhoon-hit areas recover and to build at least 25,000 houses over the next five years, state media said on Wednesday.

Visiting one of the worst-hit areas of North Korea, Kim expressed regret over the more than 50-year-old houses in which people have been living and urged the military to embark on a more ambitious construction plan, KCNA said.

The visit came after Kim appeared to shed tears at the weekend as he thanked citizens for their sacrifices, in the most striking demonstration yet of how he is relying on his “man-of- the-people” persona to tackle his country’s deepening crises.

The military has reached a construction level of 60% for at least 2,300 houses in the Komdok area in South Hamgyong province, northeast of the capital, Pyongyang, the state media said.

Kim said new houses were now only built when the old ones were brought down by natural disasters, and called for a “revolution” in construction plans, starting with building 25,000 houses during his five-year plan set to be unveiled in January.

Last week, Kim called on his country to embark on an 80-day “speed battle” – to attain economic goals before a congress in January to decide the new five-year plan.

North Korea has had a tough year because of the impact of anti-coronavirus measures, international sanctions and several typhoons that battered towns.

(Reporting by Sangmi Cha; Editing by Peter Cooney)

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Bohnett Park to Close for Renovation, Storm Water Treatment Project | Local News

October 12, 2020
| 12:10 p.m.

Bohnett Park in Santa Barbara is scheduled to close beginning Thursday, Oct. 15 for construction of a park improvement and storm water treatment project.

The park improvement project, developed with extensive community input, includes the installation of new turf and landscaping, irrigation, picnic tables along Old Mission Creek, barbecue grills, trash and coal receptacles, accessible park entrance and walkways, and new streetscape fencing.

“Bohnett Park is a key recreational area for the Westside,” said Parks and Recreation director Jill Zachary. “We are pleased to be moving forward with a project that will make the park more usable for all.”

The storm water improvement portion of the project includes the installation of underground gravel filled chambers that will capture, treat and infiltrate storm water runoff from the neighborhood surrounding Bohnett Park.

Retaining the storm water on site and allowing it to slowly infiltrate into the ground will help improve water quality in Old Mission Creek.

Civic Construction Associates be doing the construction work, which is expected to take about three months. Work will take place 7 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays. The upper park area along San Andres Street will remain open during construction.

The project is funded by a Community Development Block Grant, the city of Santa Barbara General Fund, and by hotel visitors through Measure B.
 
For more information on park improvements, contact Keven Strasburg, 805-897-1906 or [email protected] For more on the storm water project, contact George Johnson, 805) 897-1958 or [email protected]
 

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Delta now a tropical storm; nearly 500K Louisiana homes lose power

Nearly a half-million Louisiana homes were reportedly without electrical power early Saturday morning, hours after Hurricane Delta made landfall in the Gulf Coast state.

As of 11:30 p.m. CT Friday, nearly 465,000 Louisiana households were affected by the outage, according to poweroutage.us. The number rose to more than 480,000 households shortly after midnight.

By 1 a.m. CT Saturday, the hurricane was downgraded to a tropical storm, according to an advisory from the National Hurricane Center. At that time, the storm was located 15 miles east-southeast of Alexandria, La., with maximum sustained winds of 60 mph, the NHS advisory said.

By 4 a.m. CT Saturday, the tropical storm was about 45 miles south-southeast of Monroe, La., with maximum sustained winds down to 45 mph, the NHS said in an advisory.

Delta had hit land around 6 p.m. CT Friday near Creole, La., with heavy rainfall and strong winds in a region already battered by multiple hurricanes this year.

On Friday morning, Delta was still off the Louisiana coast when it was downgraded from a Category 3 hurricane — with maximum sustained winds of 120 mph — to a Category 2, with sustained winds of 115 mph, the NHC reported.

Just over an hour after making landfall, the storm weakened to a Category 1 as it continued to move inland.

Delta had sustained winds near 100 mph when it made landfall as a life-threatening storm surge. 

Winds were so strong that shingles atop the eight-room boutique L’Banca Albergo Hotel in Lake Arthur were pulled off. 

“I probably don’t have a shingle left on the top of this hotel,” owner Roberta Palermo told The Associated Press.

She said the electricity was out and, across the street, she could see pieces of metal coming off the roof of a 100-year-old building. Unsecured trash cans

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