streets

Arlington shop owners celebrate this street’s renovation

As Hershey Jones set up his namesake restaurant in downtown Arlington in late 2019, Abram Street was undergoing a facelift of its own.

The arterial roadway, running from downtown to the Grand Prairie city limits, had been under some form of construction since 2014. Workers roped off lanes to install new drainage or sewer pipes or reduced lanes to make space for wider sidewalks or lighting. For Jones’ first several months running Hershey’s Palace at 513 E. Abram St., construction complicated parking and downtown.

“It raised a flag,” he said, “but I saw that it was further completed than from the time that I did what I had to do, that it wouldn’t affect me as much.”

Now, as the city puts the finishing touches on the project, Jones is seeing more people walk around — and passersby are seeing more of the businesses that line the street.

“We want people to get out and see that downtown Arlington has improved,” he said.

Mayor Jeff Williams had a similar message Friday at the intersection of Abram and Mary streets. In front of around 50 officials and business leaders, he said better days are ahead for the city, especially downtown.

“We know that we’re not totally out of the pandemic, but we need to take note of great accomplishments, and definitely Abram is one of those,” Williams said.

The project, which voters voted to fund in the 2008 bond elections, spanned seven miles, from Collins Street to just past state Highway 360. Its completion marks the end of construction-related traffic headaches for downtown businesses and motorists. The six-year project was the largest street rebuild in the city’s history, according to officials.

Along Abram Street’s downtown stretch, businesses have started to see the renovation’s effects.

Natalie Ellis, general manager of the

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‘Complete streets’ plan to revitalize downtown Hicksville needs $22M to fund improvements

Downtown Hicksville’s chaotic jumble of roads and walkways is set for a $22 million pedestrian and bicycle-friendly makeover — if the funding can be secured.

Nassau County last week released its “complete streets” plan for the area around the Hicksville Long Island Rail Road station that is poised for revitalization.

“When you’re adding apartments or for housing or any kind of development at all you want to make sure that … you can accommodate any increased population or traffic, and you also want to look at how you can make things safer,” Nassau County Executive Laura Curran said in an interview. “You also want to look at how to make it more attractive.”

The complete streets report recommends adding 1.75 miles of bike lanes, new street crossings for commuters, extending sidewalk curbs to shorten the distance to cross streets, building median islands at wide intersections, making sidewalks and curb ramps compliant with the federal Americans with Disabilities Act and other improvements.

The plan was developed in cooperation with officials from Oyster Bay, the New York State Department of Transportation, the LIRR and local organizations.

The complete streets proposal would complement expected development. Oyster Bay was awarded a $10 million state grant in 2017 to revitalize downtown Hicksville. That grant will fund LIRR station access improvements, new public spaces and mixed-income housing. The Oyster Bay Town Board is expected to rezone the area and is considering an application for a mixed-use residential and commercial development at the former Sears site.

The most expensive recommended project in the complete streets report is $5.9 million for improvements to sidewalks and adding bicycle parking to the heart of downtown Hicksville, a half-mile stretch of Broadway from Old Country Road to John Street that is lined with small stores. Another large proposal is $5.2 million

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