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Pacific Design Studio offers homewares at online shop | Home | Spokane | The Pacific Northwest Inlander

click to enlarge Hand-painted striated vases are some of the finds at Pacific Design Company's online shop. - KAYLEEN MICHELLE PHOTO

Kayleen Michelle photo

Hand-painted striated vases are some of the finds at Pacific Design Company’s online shop.

Little Pacific Design Studio isn’t so “little” anymore. Under the new moniker of Pacific Design Company, the Spokane interior design firm owned by Shaleesa Mize now offers an online market of home décor items reflecting what she terms a “modern organic aesthetic”

“Whether I’m curating products for the shop or creating designs for homes, I like to bring a mix of modern style with earthy materials,” says Mize, who sources wool or cotton textiles (versus synthetics) and ceramic and recycled glass (not plastic), she says.

click to enlarge A green stoneware tea pot is another online product at Pacific Design Company. - KAYLEEN MICHELLE PHOTO

Kayleen Michelle photo

A green stoneware tea pot is another online product at Pacific Design Company.

“You will also find plenty of other natural materials like leather, marble, brass and copper, reclaimed wood, etc.,” Mize says.

The bone and olive wood spoons are functional works of art and, along with tea and bath towels, are among the most popular items.

click to enlarge Customers can also find organic wool pillows. - KAYLEEN MICHELLE PHOTO

Kayleen Michelle photo

Customers can also find organic wool pillows.

Mize deliberately seeks out not only high-quality natural materials, but also fair trade and unusual items. Recent additions to her offering include fair trade baskets from Africa, products made from hand-woven textiles dyed with botanicals, and the Massa pillow crafted from cactus silk.

Visit the Pacific Design Company store at shop.pacificdesignco.com.

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Students Build Studio 804’s Latest House in Challenging Times

Many schools of architecture were shut down last spring because of Covid-19, but the Studio 804 program at the University of Kansas Department of Architecture is no ordinary architecture program. It does something very unusual for an architecture school: it actually teaches students how to build a sophisticated building from the ground up. “This includes everything from initial design including all systems, construction documents, estimates, working with zoning and code officials, site layout, placing concrete, framing, roofing, siding, setting solar panels, landscape and more — there isn’t anything we don’t do ourselves.”

 Studio 804

The houses are always interesting modern designs that cannot be too unconventional or expensive as they are then sold on the open market. The 2020 version is 1550 square feet, plus a 520 square foot accessory dwelling unit.

 Studio 804

The main house has the entry facing a living wall, a great room with kitchen to one side and two bedrooms to the other.

“The design was inspired by the Midwestern farmstead vernacular of the region. These timeless vernacular qualities house all the accommodations necessary for modern, sustainable living. A unique feature of this house is the Accessory Dwelling Unit permitted in the zoning district. It is a small separate residence on the same lot that can be used for income property or for extended family members. It also supports the city of Lawrence’s goals of increased density close to downtown rather than continued sprawl into the countryside.”

Given that Covid-19 has disrupted the construction industry as well as the school year, it’s impressive that Studio 804 was able to complete this project on schedule. Studio 804 founder Dan Rockhill tells Treehugger how they coped: “We had to isolate for two months, March April. All the students came back and actually graduated as we pushed hard

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Bone Simple Design’s Long Island City Studio Is Swimming in Color (And Bright Lighting Ideas)

colorful linene shadesPin It
Photography by Dana Gallagher

The 100-year-old industrial building in Long Island City that’s now home to lighting studio Bone Simple Design has a serendipitous pedigree. It was formerly the place where luxury fabric house Scalamandré dyed its textiles. “It’s bizarre but amazing that we’re doing the same thing in the space today,” says Chad Jacobs, Bone Simple’s founder and designer. 

Dip-dyeing and painting large rope pendants and using shibori-inspired methods to spice up plain linen shades is a fairly new venture for Jacobs, who began producing his line of custom lighting in 1993. This winter, before shutting down work for a month due to COVID-19, he completed 15 five-foot-tall string fixtures for a hotel in the Bahamas by MR Architecture. The cord was plunged into a vat of golden yellow dye before completion. “For me, lighting is obviously about light, but it’s also about texture,” says Jacobs. “I’m not a big fan of the bare bulb look.” Ahead, the designer gives us a peek behind the scenes and reveals how he’s been making a splash this year with color. 

white cage pendantPin It
Photography by Dana Gallagher

In the 5,000-square-foot, first-floor space, Jacobs is joined by seven employees, most of whom come from art backgrounds. Together they work on everything by hand, with the exception of the metal plating and powder-coated frames. When Jacobs originally moved into the studio, he specified to the building where to place the junction boxes so he could suspend the fixtures all over the place. Most are operable so that the team has a bright spot to work; others, like the massive hanging white cage pendant lamp (pictured above), are on display for visiting clients.

In this scenario, the dramatic piece hangs extra low to the ground so you can really get a sense of its impressive dome shape.

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