Team

Workshop/APD and April Bovet Interior Design Team Up on a Cobble Hill, Brooklyn Gem

In the dining room, Eoos chairs ring a custom concrete table beneath a Rich Brilliant Willing pendant fixture. Photography by Donna Dotan.

Each of the five boroughs contains a constellation of neighborhoods with their own cultural quirks and pervading personalities. In Cobble Hill, ethnically diverse mom-and-pop shops and traditional brownstones entwine with a boho art scene, yielding an old-school yet forward-thinking Brooklyn vibe. It’s here that Workshop/APD founding principal Andrew Kotchen was given the opportunity to nestle a unique piece of architecture between two 1900s town houses, at once putting into relief the district’s dual natures.

GamFratesi stools pull up to the kitchen’s granite-topped island. Photography by Donna Dotan.

“It’s rare to get the chance to run an intelligent design process that isn’t based in historical preservation,” Kotchen says of the ground-up plan he conceived for his client, a married couple with two teenage children. After performing initial zoning studies, he and the WAPD team demolished the existing residence and inserted a modernist glass-and-steel town house, encompassing 7,000 square feet and four bedrooms across six floors. “We didn’t set out to take up every inch of buildable square footage,” Kotchen continues. “The focus was on creating comfortable, livable rooms.” Leveraging ideas from past projects with this client, he has devised, in its “calming simplicity,” an exemplar of the contemporary urban home.

White-oak built-ins backdrop an Antonio Citterio sofa and ottoman in the living room. Photography by Donna Dotan.

The streamlined program begins with a triple-height entry atrium that references elements from the facade. A screen of ebonized-oak slats rises the full 31 feet and then crosses the ceiling, the orientations nodding to the exterior’s vertical windows and horizontal Belgian bricks, which extend into the entry. Furthermore, the slat color links to the blackened steel framing those windows. It

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Lowe’s NFL “Home Team Roster” Is Doing Amazing Community Service Projects Across the Country

Lowe’s

During these tough times of the coronavirus pandemic, we’ve been amazed at how many people—celebrities and regular folks alike—have devoted themselves to helping those in need. Now, we’re happy to hear this piece of feel-good news from Lowe’s, the home improvement store, which has just launched the “Home Team Roster,” a lineup of players from all 32 NFL teams working on various community impact projects in their respective NFL hometowns.

For the partnership, each player will volunteer on a project ranging from affordable housing repairs and small business support to veterans’ outreach and disaster recovery. Lamar Jackson, Baltimore Ravens’ quarterback and 2019 NFL MVP, is serving as “captain” for Lowe’s Home Team, and is very much looking forward to making a difference in Charm City.

For his specific project, the star quarterback will work with Lowe’s and Baltimore’s Southwest Partnership to help with the opening of the United Way Family Center in Poppleton at Excel Academy. The center provides quality early childhood education and daycare, as well as support for student parents. The United Way Family Center is part of Lowe’s broader commitment to support housing and workforce needs in Southwest Baltimore.

“It’s important for me to be able to give back to the community and support the people that have supported me,” Jackson said in a Lowe’s press release. “Being a part of the Lowe’s Home Team is special for me because it gives me the chance to bring people together and give back.” The soon-to-open family center is pictured below, and we’re hopeful it will be a very special addition to the community.

Julie Filderman (United Way of Central Maryland)

Julie Filderman (United Way of Central Maryland)

The Home Team roster also includes fellow ‘co-captain’ Carolina Panthers’ Christian McCaffrey, Pittsburgh Steelers’ James Conner, Atlanta Falcons’ Calvin Ridley,

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Spotlight Team probe: Potential Medicaid discrimination at Massachusetts nursing homes

The replies etched a clear pattern. Nursing homes were more than twice as likely to say they had no room when responding to inquiries from families saying they planned to pay for care with Medicaid — the government health program relied on by low-income residents — rather than paying privately.

Often the difference wasn’t subtle. In some cases, employees from the same facility would tell the daughter of a purported Medicaid applicant that there was a waiting list, while telling the daughter of a private payer, who could be expected to pay the nursing home nearly twice as much, she would be happy to discuss the options.

Discrimination against applicants covered by Medicaid has existed for years in the nursing home industry, say advocates for the elderly, and it can be illegal.

Massachusetts adopted explicit protections in 1994, barring nursing homes from discriminating against “any Medicaid recipient or person eligible or soon-to-be-eligible to receive Medicaid benefits.” The regulations also prohibit facilities from offering help “in the preparation of applications or in any facet of the admission process to private pay applicants in a manner greater than that rendered or offered to Medicaid recipients.”

And yet many nursing homes do appear biased against Medicaid patients.

“You have more choices if you have money. That’s the world we live in,” said attorney Steven Cohen, a partner at Pabian & Russell in Boston who specializes in long-term-care and estate planning.

Medicaid pays nursing homes an average $209 per day, far less than the $389 typically paid out-of-pocket by well-off senior citizens — a sizable difference for an industry plagued by ongoing financial struggles and closures — according to 2018 state data. The most exclusive nursing homes charge private-pay residents even more.

Bed availability at nursing homes legitimately varies daily as patients die or

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