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How To Plan A Bathroom Remodel In Texas

This post is sponsored and contributed by a Patch Brand Partner. The views expressed in this post are the author’s own.

Be sure to take these five steps before contacting a professional bathroom remodeler.
Be sure to take these five steps before contacting a professional bathroom remodeler. (Shutterstock)

But to ensure the results are as you hoped, you’ll want to do some planning ahead of time. Take these five steps before contacting a pro.

1. Plan Your Design

While professional bathroom remodelers will be able to help you make structural decisions, it’s wise for you to know ahead of time what you’d like the end result to look like. Do a little brainstorming to come up with concrete ideas, like, “I’d like a freestanding tub and separate shower,” or “I prefer a pedestal sink to a drop-in model.”

Browse sites like Pinterest for inspiration as to layout, aesthetics, and materials. Save some photos to show your contractor and point out what you like about them.

2. Determine The Contractors You’ll Need

You might think one firm can come in and tackle your entire bathroom remodel. While some can, it is better in many instances to hire a few specialty contractors. Contrary to popular belief, this can actually save money and increase the longevity of your remodel.

So, first think about who you will need: a custom millworker, plumber, bath fitter, etc.


Need a professional bathroom remodeler? Find an expert near you.


3. Look Into Necessary Permits

Small-scale bathroom remodels most likely won’t call for any permits. However, large-scale projects may require building permits, which you can obtain through your local government offices.

Also, keep in mind that many local governments require electrical wiring

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Delta leaves nearly 700,000 homes, businesses without power in Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi

Nearly 700,000 homes and businesses in Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi are in the dark after losing power due to Delta, which hit the U.S. Gulf Coast as a hurricane and has since been downgraded to a tropical depression.

According to the data aggregator PowerOutage.us, 685,195 utility customers were without power across the three states as of 2:40 p.m. ET Saturday.

That was down from the nearly 750,000 households and businesses that had power outages earlier Saturday. The highest number of outages is in Louisiana with more than 546,000.

Delta made landfall on Friday evening as a Category 2 near Creole, Louisiana, with maximum sustained winds of 100 mph. Just six weeks earlier, the Louisiana coastal area was battered by Hurricane Laura.

The storm then moved directly over Lake Charles, a waterfront city about 30 miles inland where homes and buildings were already damaged by Laura.

The storm is expected to track northeastward across the Lower Mississippi and Tennessee valleys, bringing “destructive winds and dangerous flooding,” according to the National Weather Service.

Parts of the Southeast will continue to see heavy rain, resulting in flash floods. A few tornadoes are also possible for the area, while New England was advised to prepare for strong to severe thunderstorms.

Lake Charles Mayor Nic Hunter, who rode out Delta’s arrival downtown, said tarps were flying off homes across the city and piles of wreckage were being blown around, some of it floating in the surge of ocean water.

Brian Schexnayder walks down a flooded street Saturday in Iowa, La.Jonathan Bachman / Reuters

“I’m in a building right now with a tarp on it and just the sound of the tarp flapping on the building sounds like someone pounding with a sledgehammer on top of the building,“ Hunter said. ”It’s pretty intense.”

In Lake

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$375,000 Homes in Pennsylvania, Vermont and Texas

This brick house is in the East Passyunk Crossing neighborhood in South Philadelphia, about two miles from Center City and close to restaurants (currently with street dining), vintage stores, cafes, parks and the Singing Fountain at East Passyunk Avenue north of Tasker Street, which belts out Sinatra and other standards from hidden speakers.

Size: 1,100 square feet

Price per square foot: $339

Indoors: The two-story house has an open-plan lower floor with refinished parquet flooring in the living area at the front. Beyond an archway is a dining area and the kitchen. The kitchen was updated several years ago with wood floors, white cabinets, subway tile and stainless steel appliances. Sliding-glass doors at the back open to a walled patio. There is also a half bathroom on this floor.

Upstairs are two bedrooms, front and back, which are (unusually for this housing type) almost of equal size. Between them is a walk-in closet or home-office space. The skylighted bathroom has a combined tub and shower and a black-and-white-tile floor.

A washer and dryer are in the unfinished basement.

Outdoor space: The rear patio includes a built-in storage bench.

Taxes: $3,487

Contact: Joe Brady, Team Damis, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, Fox & Roach Realtors, 267-401-4291; teamdamis.com


The rumor attached to this Victorian church building, formerly St. John the Baptist, is that it was abandoned in the 1970s because it lacked a center aisle and was considered undesirable for weddings. (Its successor is cater-corner across Main Street.) After sitting vacant for several years, the building was transformed in the 1980s into a

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State of Texas: TWC contractor reveals call center problems; Senate candidates prepare for debate

AUSTIN (Nexstar) – Imagine showing up to a job where you know that almost 75% of what you do will fail someone. What if a fireman failed to help someone in three out of four fire calls? What if a police officer failed to help clear three out of four 911 calls?

Day, after day.

That’s what a contractor helping field calls for the Texas Workforce Commission told us was going on inside some of the agency’s call centers. The contractor, who asked to not be identified in this report, told KXAN the problem facing nearly every caller is that their call may be answered by people who have no way to help Texans calling for help with their unemployment problems.

This worker said they’re unable to help about three-quarters of the people who call with unemployment problems.

Since the pandemic hit in mid-March, hundreds of unemployed Texans wrote to us, all telling the same story: thousands of calls to the TWC’s lone toll-free number are never answered. The few who have connected are likely to find themselves on the line with one of 1,600 contracted customer service representatives.

At first, they think their prayers are answered and the weeks – sometimes months – of waiting for their unemployment benefits is over.

RELATED: Planning to appeal a TWC decision, prepare for 18-week wait

Then, the contractor reads from the script they use when they answer a call: “I am limited to the types of questions I can answer.”

That’s led to many unemployed Texans hitting a dead-end, following a series of calls to the TWC, and never finding help.

In April, the bosses inside the TWC were scrambling. As state and local stay-at-home orders began locking Texans down in mid-March, millions lost their jobs and headed straight for the unemployment

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Texas taps federal funds to help nursing homes buy equipment to expand COVID-era visits

AUSTIN — State officials announced Friday they will help nursing homes tap $3.5 million in federal funds to buy equipment that would allow more visitors during the coronavirus pandemic.

Starting Monday, certified nursing homes in Texas can apply for up to $3,000 each toward purchasing plexiglass barriers for expanded indoor visits and tents to accommodate more safe gatherings outdoors, Gov. Greg Abbott and the Health and Human Services Commission announced.

Texas has 1,213 such homes, said commission spokeswoman Christine Mann.

The $3.5 million is part of a bigger pool of funds the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services took in after slapping fines on nursing homes that violate federal rules, officials said.

The move comes a few weeks after Abbott announced plans – which took effect Sept. 24 – for up to two “essential caregivers” to resume indoor visits, provided they’ve tested negative for COVID-19 in the last two weeks. Those visits are allowed without a plexiglass divider, as the caregivers do things such as clean hearing aids.

But the state is still requiring relatives and visitors who are not essential caregivers to be separated from the resident at all times by a plexiglass barrier.

Such visits are only allowed in a county with a COVID-19 positivity rate of 10% or less.

Cindy Goleman walks up to the window of her mother Peggy White from outside the window at The Pavilion at Creekwood, a healthcare and rehabilitation center in Mansfield, Texas on Tuesday, March 24, 2020. Peggy White had a stroke in late January. Cindy Goleman is one of those people with parents and/or loved ones in nursing homes, hospitals or skilled healthcare facilities who can't visit in person. Goleman visits by looking through the window as she talks to her on the phone. (Vernon Bryant/The Dallas Morning News)

The head of a leading nursing home trade group welcomed the state-administered federal stipends, saying “providers understand the importance” of resuming visits.

“Everyone wants to see this work,” said Kevin Warren, president of the Texas Health Care Association.

But one advocate of more rapidly expanded family visits, Mary Nichols of Forney, the state needs to stop foot-dragging by some nursing homes on allowing designated caregiver visits.

“If a facility gets $3,000, I hope they spend it all on tents — because I don’t approve of the plexiglass

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