tissue

Outlook on the Tissue Paper Global Market to 2025 – Bathroom Tissue to Occupy the Maximum Growth Demand – ResearchAndMarkets.com

The “Tissue Paper Market – Growth, Trends, and Forecast (2020-2025)” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

With the global average consumption per person per year reaching to 55kg, the global tissue paper market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 6.45% during 2020-2025.

According to RISI, Tissue production globally should exceed 44 million tonnes in 2021, an increase of more than 14 million tonnes over 2010. Advancements in tissue manufacturing technology and the efficient use of raw materials will lead to improving both the design of tissue products and the way they are dispensed.

Companies Mentioned

  • Clearwater Paper Corporation
  • Kruger Products
  • Sofidel Group
  • Wausau Paper Corp.
  • Cascades Tissue Group Inc.
  • Procter & Gamble
  • Asia Pulp and Paper (APP)
  • SCA (Svenska Cellulosa Aktiebolaget)
  • Georgia Pacific LLC
  • Kimberly-Clark Corporation
  • Essity

Key Market Trends

Bathroom Tissue to Occupy the Maximum Growth Demand

  • Among all the tissue paper products, bathroom tissue remains the key tissue category, driving the tissue market forward through a combination of necessity and the general westernization of toilet culture. Increased development of organic tissue papers, rising disposable incomes, and government policies to promote public health are also some of the major factors driving the growth of the market.
  • There is a sudden spike in the demand for tissue papers due to the ongoing spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. The manufacturers of these tissues are producing 20% more than the normal levels which might strain the supply chain.
  • On the other hand, increasing raw material prices are a significant factor that is negatively impacting the growth of the market for bathroom tissue all over the world. Moreover, the new innovative products, such as electronic dryers, are impacting the growth of the market.
  • In the long run, high-tech toilets based on water and air jetting with several additional functions, including
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TL1A and its receptor could reduce fibrosis and tissue remodeling in patients with severe lung disease

Your lungs and airways need to be stretchy, sort of like balloons. Take a big breath, and they’ll open right up.

Damaged lungs can’t open properly. Patients with asthma, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and systemic sclerosis suffer from fibrosis and tissue remodeling, where a build-up of tissue and immune cells, and proteins that form a glue-like substance, keep the airways from expanding. As fibrosis gets worse, taking a breath feels like blowing up a balloon filled with concrete.

In a new study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) report that a protein called TL1A drives fibrosis in several mouse models, triggering tissue remodeling, and making it harder for lungs and airways to function normally.

“Our new study suggests that TL1A and its receptor on cells could be targets for therapeutics aimed at reducing fibrosis and tissue remodeling in patients with severe lung disease,” says LJI Professor Michael Croft, Ph.D., director of scientific affairs at LJI and senior author of the new study in The Journal of Immunology.

Croft’s laboratory is focused on understanding the importance of a family of proteins, called tumor necrosis factors (TNF) and tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFR), in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. By investigating these molecules, researchers hope to track down the root causes of inflammation and stop tissue damage before it’s too late.

Previous research had shown that a TNF protein called TL1A can act on immune cells involved in allergic reactions and drive those immune cells to make inflammatory molecules. The Croft Lab wondered-;if TL1A leads to inflammation, could it contribute to fibrosis in the lungs?

For the new study, Croft and his colleagues used genetic and therapeutic interventions, tissue staining, and fluorescence imaging techniques to study protein interactions in mouse models of severe

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