toolkit

Researchers design comprehensive toolkit to help Ohioans at higher COVID-19 risk

Those looking to improve the lives of Ohioans facing the greatest COVID-19 risks now have a comprehensive, evidence-based toolkit – one designed to inform the work of everyone from grassroots community groups to state leaders.

Ohio’s COVID-19 Populations Needs Assessment, released today (Oct. 13, 2020) and led by experts at The Ohio State University College of Public Health, aims to improve Ohioans’ ability to prevent transmission of the virus and minimize its impact on communities that are at elevated risk.

The new report, conducted in collaboration with the Ohio Department of Health, is built on information gathered from a survey of 363 Ohioans representing people of color, rural populations and individuals with disabilities.

The survey, subsequent analysis and recommendations focus on six populations: Black and African American; Latino and Hispanic; Asian and Asian American; immigrant and refugee; rural; and people with disabilities.

All of these are communities of people living strong, full, culturally rich lives with various resources and leaders. We sincerely hope that this report helps the communities, and those who serve them, to build upon that foundation.”


Julianna Nemeth, Assistant Professor, Department of Health Behavior and Health Promotion, Ohio State University College of Public Health  

Nemeth also co-led the project with Tasleem Padamsee, an assistant professor of health services management and policy.

Going in, the research team knew that these communities were among those most likely to suffer disproportionately high rates of infection, hospitalization and death because they entered the pandemic already dealing with poorer overall health status, lesser access to health care and more negative social determinants of health than others.

The needs assessment explored where these Ohioans live and work, what resources exist in these areas, what barriers these groups face in accessing public

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