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California wildfire destroys over 550 homes as fire crews increase containment, ‘turned the corner’

A wildfire burning in Northern California’s famed wine country has now destroyed over 550 homes, but officials said Monday they were hopeful as containment of the blaze increased overall.

Cal Fire said as of Tuesday morning the Glass Fire that’s burning in Napa and Sonoma counties has scorched some 66,840 acres and is now 50% contained.

“We have turned the corner on the fire as a whole,” Cal Fire division chief Ben Nicholls said during a briefing in Sonoma County.

CALIFORNIA WILDFIRE SURPASSES 1 MILLION ACRES AS AUGUST COMPLEX DUBBED ‘MEGAFIRE’

Over 2,700 fire personnel are involved in the battle against the blaze, with some 408 fire engines deployed in the fight against the two-county blaze, according to the agency.

“We are the priority for the state here,” Nicholls said Monday.

In this Sept. 28, 2020, file photo, houses leveled by the Glass Fire are viewed on a street in the Skyhawk neighborhood of Santa Rosa, Calif.

In this Sept. 28, 2020, file photo, houses leveled by the Glass Fire are viewed on a street in the Skyhawk neighborhood of Santa Rosa, Calif.
(AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)

The blaze has destroyed some 553 homes, with 297 in Sonoma County and 256 in Napa County that have been lost so far. The wildfire is still threatening over 21,000 structures, according to fire officials.

A firefighter runs past flames while battling the Glass Fire in a Calistoga, Calif., vineyard Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020.

A firefighter runs past flames while battling the Glass Fire in a Calistoga, Calif., vineyard Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020.
(AP Photo/Noah Berger)

The wildfire has also damaged or destroyed at least 18 wineries, with many locations reporting major damage.

“We have a little half an acre here that got pretty scorched,” Lisa Drinkward of Behrens Family Winery told KTVU.

A chimney stands at a Fairwinds Estate Winery building, which burned in the Glass Fire, on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020, in Calistoga, Calif.

A chimney stands at a Fairwinds Estate Winery building, which burned in the Glass Fire, on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020, in Calistoga, Calif.
(AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Nearly 3,000 people remain under mandatory evacuation orders in Sonoma County, while 13,000 are under warnings and may need

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Why Americans Have Turned to Nesting



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© Asia Pietrzyk


It has come to my attention that my apartment sucks. Objectively, that might be too harsh an assessment, but it certainly feels true right now. Don’t get me wrong: It has big, sunny windows; appliances that are functional, albeit old and ugly; and an amount of closet space that I would describe as “enough.” But the many things the apartment leaves to be desired—cheap fixtures, landlord-beige walls, and an ancient tile kitchen floor that never quite looks clean—have become unavoidably obvious to me as I’ve sat inside of it for the better part of this year.

The longer I sit, the more the flaws taunt me. The shallow kitchen sink, combined with the low slope of its faucet, makes it impossible to fill a pitcher straight from the tap, but most of my daily drinking water used to come from a machine at the office. The back wall of my kitchen, swathed in white paint, has borne the brunt of gurgling vats of spaghetti sauce and sputtering pans of fried-chicken grease, but I failed to notice the unscrubbable spots when I wasn’t standing in front of the stove preparing three meals a day, every day. The dusty ledges and shelves, unsightly window-unit air conditioners, and scuffed, jaundiced paint job weren’t so irritating when they weren’t my whole world.

In May, when the novelty of quarantine baking began to wear off—one can make only so many galettes out of frozen fruit originally bought for smoothies—my idle hands turned to the problems around me. Armed with my pathetic beginner’s tool kit, I started small. I raised and releveled a shelf that had been crooked for, by my estimation, at least two years. I ordered frames for prints that had been stashed in my closet and charged my

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Ford Engineers Took My Advice and Turned the F-150 PowerBoost Hybrid Into a Mobile Kitchen

You may recall, ahem, a few months ago we had a post on this website written by yours truly titled: “You Can Power An Entire Mobile Restaurant with the 2021 Ford F-150’s Onboard Generator.” It was a bit of fun, we did some math, a good time was had. However, we got an email this week that brought us back to those heady days of the June F-150 reveal. As it turns out, Ford engineers took an F-150 PowerBoost with Pro Power Onboard tech to a campsite in New York State with an oven, a mini fridge and a coffee maker, and they used it all to cook their meals. 



a truck cake sitting on top of a car: You may recall, ahem, a few months ago we had a post on this website written by yours truly titled: "You Can Power An Entire Mobile Restaurant with the 2021 Ford F-150's Onboard Generator." It was a bit of fun, we did some math, a good time was had. However, we got an email this […]


© Provided by The Drive
You may recall, ahem, a few months ago we had a post on this website written by yours truly titled: “You Can Power An Entire Mobile Restaurant with the 2021 Ford F-150’s Onboard Generator.” It was a bit of fun, we did some math, a good time was had. However, we got an email this […]

Now, okay, this isn’t exactly the grand restaurant plan I had a few months ago, but it’s something. Beyond that, it proves my theory that such a thing is theoretically possible. Luckily, they took pictures and yes, it looks just as silly as the topshot we made for the original post.

They claim to have made a delicious slow-braised brisket, coffee every morning with a Keurig machine and bread pudding for dessert. And judging by the evidence I see in the photos, it looks like that’s all true. Perhaps they weren’t quite as ambitious as I was in my post, but hey, they actually went out there and did it. Also, the oven they used apparently had a peak power consumption of something like 7 kilowatts, which is a

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My employer turned us all into contractors. As soon as he got a government bailout, we all got canned. Is that legal?

Q: After coronavirus hit, my employer changed a dozen of us to contractor status. None of us understood why or what it would mean. At first it seemed like a good thing as we wound up with more cash every payday without payroll taxes coming out of our checks.

My employer then applied for and got government bailout money. As soon as that happened, we all got canned. We later learned employers can fire contractors without being in violation of the loan terms.

Initially, my family and I were able to get by on unemployment, but then our car went on the blink, and we had other unexpected expenses. We’re now surviving on handouts; I’m standing in line at food banks to feed my kids. The food I’m given feeds my family but eats my dignity. Is what my employer did legit?

A: Possibly not. If your employer simply relabeled multiple employees as contractors without changing their job duties, your employer may run afoul of both the Department of Labor and the Internal Revenue Service.

Contractor versus employee status is a big deal, particularly now with so many furloughed, laid off or fired employees working in the gig-economy as independent contractors. Employers don’t need to pay independent contractors minimum wage, overtime or provide them with the benefits of employees.

FisherBroyles management-side employment attorney Eric Meyer notes that employers can easily misclassify employees as independent contractors. According to Meyer, seven of the most significant factors in determining whether a worker is an employee or independent contractor include “the extent to which the services rendered are an integral part of the principal’s business; the relationship’s permanency; the amount of the worker’s own investment in facilities and equipment; the employer’s nature and degree of control; the worker’s opportunities for profit and loss; the

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