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North Carolina Governor Drops ‘Bathroom Bill’ Lawsuit Against U.S. : The Two-Way : NPR

Supporters gather at the North Carolina Capitol in April in support of a law that regulates which bathrooms people can use and blocks local governments in the state from extending anti-discrimination protections to LGBT people.

Gerry Broome/AP


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Gerry Broome/AP

Supporters gather at the North Carolina Capitol in April in support of a law that regulates which bathrooms people can use and blocks local governments in the state from extending anti-discrimination protections to LGBT people.

Gerry Broome/AP

North Carolina’s governor has dropped a lawsuit asking a federal court to preserve the state’s HB2 law limiting civil rights protections for LGBT people and regulating who uses which public bathrooms.

In court documents Friday, Gov. Pat McCrory cited “substantial costs to the State” as one reason for dropping his lawsuit against the federal government, writing that it did not serve the “interests of judicial economy and efficiency.”

Businesses, performing artists and event organizers have boycotted the state since House Bill 2 was passed. In July, the NBA announced it was pulling its February All-Star Game out of Charlotte, saying in a statement, “We do not believe we can successfully host our All-Star festivities in Charlotte in the climate created by the current law.”

This month, the NCAA and the Atlantic Coast Conference both moved championship sporting events out of the state.

McCrory sued the federal government in May, after U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch said HB2 violated both the Civil Rights Act and Title IX and threatened to withhold federal funding to the state. The Department of Justice countersued, seeking to ban enforcement on the grounds that the law is, as Lynch said at the time, “impermissibly discriminatory.”

“This action is about a great deal more than just bathrooms. This is about the dignity and respect we accord our

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