undone

Carrier Dome renovation: What’s left undone? What might come next?

Syracuse, N.Y. — Syracuse is investing $118 million in renovating the Carrier Dome, installing a new roof, improving amenities and providing what the school is touting as a “new stadium experience.”

In previous conversations before the impact of the coronavirus pandemic, Syracuse athletic director John Wildhack had noted there is an appetite to do make more improvements and Syracuse has referenced a future Phase 2 of the renovation, although it hasn’t set a timetable or promised any specific upgrades.

There are certainly additional luxuries that fans would suggest.. Some of these things were initially included in renderings, while others have been discussed as options.

Heading into the weekend that Syracuse celebrates completing some substantial components of the project, here’s a look at what could be next. (Also, a look at a video of the new scoreboard, courtesy of SU).

Seating

The most common complaint from Syracuse fans that wasn’t addressed in the renovation was the tightly-packed silver benches that currently serve as seats in the venue.

The hard metal isn’t very comfortable, prompting the university to sell cushions to fans. There is limited space for food or drinks, leaving them in constant danger of being stepped on or kicked over. At this point, many arenas offer individuals seats with cupholders, at least in select areas.

The bleachers are built tightly together, seemingly made the appropriate size for people that lived 40 years ago rather than today. The silver doesn’t look very nice on television broadcasts.

Syracuse has acknowledged this is an improvement they would like to see made, although it hasn’t fit into the project so far.

Syracuse has also sent out fan surveys trying to gauge how popular things like luxury seating would be, and what price fans would be willing to pay for certain experiences.

Given the comfort

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What’s left undone? What might come next?

Syracuse, N.Y. — Syracuse is investing $118 million in renovating the Carrier Dome, installing a new roof, improving amenities and providing what the school is touting as a “new stadium experience.”



a close up of a bridge: Syracuse football will play its first game in the Carrier Dome on Saturday against Georgia Tech since a recently completed $118 million renovation of the facility.


© N. Scott Trimble | [email protected]/N. Scott Trimble | [email protected]/syracuse.com/TNS
Syracuse football will play its first game in the Carrier Dome on Saturday against Georgia Tech since a recently completed $118 million renovation of the facility.

In previous conversations before the impact of the coronavirus pandemic, Syracuse athletic director John Wildhack had noted there is an appetite to do make more improvements and Syracuse has referenced a future Phase 2 of the renovation, although it hasn’t set a timetable or promised any specific upgrades.

There are certainly additional luxuries that fans would suggest.. Some of these things were initially included in renderings, while others have been discussed as options.

Heading into the weekend that Syracuse celebrates completing some substantial components of the project, here’s a look at what could be next. (Also, a look at a video of the new scoreboard, courtesy of SU).

Seating

The most common complaint from Syracuse fans that wasn’t addressed in the renovation was the tightly-packed silver benches that currently serve as seats in the venue.

The hard metal isn’t very comfortable, prompting the university to sell cushions to fans. There is limited space for food or drinks, leaving them in constant danger of being stepped on or kicked over. At this point, many arenas offer individuals seats with cupholders, at least in select areas.

The bleachers are built tightly together, seemingly made the appropriate size for people that lived 40 years ago rather than today. The silver doesn’t look very nice on television broadcasts.

Syracuse has acknowledged this is an improvement they would like to see made, although it hasn’t fit into

Continue Reading