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Pensacola area contractors warn of scams, see high demand

Madison Arnold, Pensacola News Journal
Published 6:00 a.m. CT Sept. 25, 2020 | Updated 3:52 p.m. CT Sept. 25, 2020

More than a week after Hurricane Sally made landfall, Shirley Hopkins has already had to re-tack the blue tarp to the roof of her East Yonge Street home so Thursday morning’s rain wouldn’t seep in like it did last week.

“Every so often you have to go back and add some more of those roofing nails because the wind gets under the tarp and it blows the tarp up and with all the rain coming in, you absolutely have to have it down all the time because it’s going to cause the leaks that are in your house to become worse,” Hopkins said. “We’re just hoping that it’s going to hold out for a few days.”

Hopkins lost about two-thirds of her roof, which caused rain water to drip into her home, through the ceiling and onto her carpet. Now she’s worried about mold setting in and she still can’t connect with any roofers to inspect her home.

“Every time we see a sign (for a roofer), we write it down and we call. And they say ‘OK, we’re going to get back with you,'” Hopkins said. “We’ve had some trouble getting people really to come out or return calls.”

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Roofers and contractors around the Pensacola area are being inundated with calls from residents who have wind, water and tree damage to their homes and property following the storm. That may leave residents like Hopkins who can’t get connected with roofers or contractors vulnerable to scams, shoddy work or unlicensed companies.

“I know that time is critical and I think people have that sense of urgency and they want to get back

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UK mortgage approvals hit 13-year high, as firms warn of tough times – business live | Business

A Greggs bakers store in Cardiff, south Wales, at the start of the lockdown

A Greggs bakers store in Cardiff, south Wales, at the start of the lockdown Photograph: Geoff Caddick/AFP via Getty Images

Good morning, and welcome to our rolling coverage of the world economy, the financial markets, the eurozone and business.

A swathe of UK companies are reporting today that Covid-19 continues to hurt their businesses, more than six months after the UK first imposed restrictions to battle the pandemic.

High street baker Greggs has warned that staff faced reduced hours, and potentially job cuts, as it tries to cut its employment costs.

Greggs, famous for its steak bakes, sausage rolls and new vegan offerings, reports that like-for-like sales in September are only 76.1% of the 2019 levels (an improvement on a ‘slow’ August).

With the government’s furlough scheme wrapping up in a month (replaced by a less generous wage subsidy package), Greggs says it must make cuts:


With business activity levels remaining below normal for the foreseeable future we must change the way we work to be as productive and flexible as we can in order to protect as many jobs as possible for the long term. We have completed a review of our activity and requirements in every part of the business and are now proposing a series of changes which are the subject of a collective consultation with union and employee representatives.

Our aim is to minimise the risk of job losses by negotiating reduced hours in our shops and we will update on the outcome of the consultation when concluded.

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Newcastle based Greggs say they plan to cut staff hours to “minimise the risk of job losses”.

This is when the furlough scheme ends next month.

The chain say though, sales have picked up over the past month as it continues its recovery following

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